Definition of Rican. Meaning of Rican. Synonyms of Rican

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Definition of Rican

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A Americana
Maguey Mag"uey, n. [Sp. maguey, Mexican maguei and metl.] (Bot.) The century plant, a species of Agave (A. Americana). See Agave.
A Americana
Widgeon Widg"eon, n. [Probably from an old French form of F. vigeon, vingeon, gingeon; of uncertain origin; cf. L. vipio, -onis, a kind of small crane.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus Anas. The common European widgeon (Anas penelope) and the American widgeon (A. Americana) are the most important species. The latter is called also baldhead, baldpate, baldface, baldcrown, smoking duck, wheat, duck, and whitebelly. Bald-faced, or Green-headed, widgeon, the American widgeon. Black widgeon, the European tufted duck. Gray widgeon. (a) The gadwall. (b) The pintail duck. Great headed widgeon, the poachard. Pied widgeon. (a) The poachard. (b) The goosander. Saw-billed widgeon, the merganser. Sea widgeon. See in the Vocabulary. Spear widgeon, the goosander. [Prov. Eng.] Spoonbilled widgeon, the shoveler. White widgeon, the smew. Wood widgeon, the wood duck.
A Americana
Agave A*ga"ve, n. [L. Agave, prop. name, fr. Gr. ?, fem. of ? illustrious, noble.] (bot.) A genus of plants (order Amaryllidace[ae]) of which the chief species is the maguey or century plant (A. Americana), wrongly called Aloe. It is from ten to seventy years, according to climate, in attaining maturity, when it produces a gigantic flower stem, sometimes forty feet in height, and perishes. The fermented juice is the pulque of the Mexicans; distilled, it yields mescal. A strong thread and a tough paper are made from the leaves, and the wood has many uses.
A Americanus
Lant Lant, n. [Cf. Lance.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small, slender, marine fishes of the genus Ammedytes. The common European species (A. tobianus) and the American species (A. Americanus) live on sandy shores, buried in the sand, and are caught in large quantities for bait. Called also launce, and sand eel.
A Americanus
Moose Moose, n. [A native name; Knisteneaux mouswah; Algonquin monse. Mackenzie.] (Zo["o]l.) A large cervine mammal (Alces machlis, or A. Americanus), native of the Northern United States and Canada. The adult male is about as large as a horse, and has very large, palmate antlers. It closely resembles the European elk, and by many zo["o]logists is considered the same species. See Elk. Moose bird (Zo["o]l.), the Canada jayor whisky jack. See Whisky jack. Moose deer. Same as Moose. Moose yard (Zo["o]l.), a locality where moose, in winter, herd together in a forest to feed and for mutual protection.
African
African Af"ri*can, n. A native of Africa; also one ethnologically belonging to an African race.
African
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
African hemp
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
African hemp
Hemp Hemp (h[e^]mp), n. [OE. hemp, AS. henep, h[ae]nep; akin to D. hennep, OHG. hanaf, G. hanf, Icel. hampr, Dan. hamp, Sw. hampa, L. cannabis, cannabum, Gr. ka`nnabis, ka`nnabos; cf. Russ. konoplia, Skr. [,c]a[.n]a; all prob. borrowed from some other language at an early time. Cf. Cannabine, Canvas.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Cannabis (C. sativa), the fibrous skin or bark of which is used for making cloth and cordage. The name is also applied to various other plants yielding fiber. 2. The fiber of the skin or rind of the plant, prepared for spinning. The name has also been extended to various fibers resembling the true hemp. African hemp, Bowstring hemp. See under African, and Bowstring. Bastard hemp, the Asiatic herb Datisca cannabina. Canada hemp, a species of dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum), the fiber of which was used by the Indians. Hemp agrimony, a coarse, composite herb of Europe (Eupatorium cannabinum), much like the American boneset. Hemp nettle, a plant of the genus Galeopsis (G. Tetrahit), belonging to the Mint family. Indian hemp. See under Indian, a. Manila hemp, the fiber of Musa textilis. Sisal hemp, the fiber of Agave sisalana, of Mexico and Yucatan. Sunn hemp, a fiber obtained from a leguminous plant (Crotalaria juncea). Water hemp, an annual American weed (Acnida cannabina), related to the amaranth.
African marigold
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
African oak
Oak Oak ([=o]k), n. [OE. oke, ok, ak, AS. [=a]c; akin to D. eik, G. eiche, OHG. eih, Icel. eik, Sw. ek, Dan. eeg.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. The oaks have alternate leaves, often variously lobed, and staminate flowers in catkins. The fruit is a smooth nut, called an acorn, which is more or less inclosed in a scaly involucre called the cup or cupule. There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the northern parts of South America and Africa. Many of the oaks form forest trees of grand proportions and live many centuries. The wood is usually hard and tough, and provided with conspicuous medullary rays, forming the silver grain. 2. The strong wood or timber of the oak. Note: Among the true oaks in America are: Barren oak, or Black-jack, Q. nigra. Basket oak, Q. Michauxii. Black oak, Q. tinctoria; -- called also yellow or quercitron oak. Bur oak (see under Bur.), Q. macrocarpa; -- called also over-cup or mossy-cup oak. Chestnut oak, Q. Prinus and Q. densiflora. Chinquapin oak (see under Chinquapin), Q. prinoides. Coast live oak, Q. agrifolia, of California; -- also called enceno. Live oak (see under Live), Q. virens, the best of all for shipbuilding; also, Q. Chrysolepis, of California. Pin oak. Same as Swamp oak. Post oak, Q. obtusifolia. Red oak, Q. rubra. Scarlet oak, Q. coccinea. Scrub oak, Q. ilicifolia, Q. undulata, etc. Shingle oak, Q. imbricaria. Spanish oak, Q. falcata. Swamp Spanish oak, or Pin oak, Q. palustris. Swamp white oak, Q. bicolor. Water oak, Q. aguatica. Water white oak, Q. lyrata. Willow oak, Q. Phellos. Among the true oaks in Europe are: Bitter oak, or Turkey oak, Q. Cerris (see Cerris). Cork oak, Q. Suber. English white oak, Q. Robur. Evergreen oak, Holly oak, or Holm oak, Q. Ilex. Kermes oak, Q. coccifera. Nutgall oak, Q. infectoria. Note: Among plants called oak, but not of the genus Quercus, are: African oak, a valuable timber tree (Oldfieldia Africana). Australian, or She, oak, any tree of the genus Casuarina (see Casuarina). Indian oak, the teak tree (see Teak). Jerusalem oak. See under Jerusalem. New Zealand oak, a sapindaceous tree (Alectryon excelsum). Poison oak, the poison ivy. See under Poison.
African oak
Teak Teak, n. [Malayalm tekku.] (Bot.) A tree of East Indies (Tectona grandis) which furnishes an extremely strong and durable timber highly valued for shipbuilding and other purposes; also, the timber of the tree. [Written also teek.] African teak, a tree (Oldfieldia Africana) of Sierra Leone; also, its very heavy and durable wood; -- called also African oak. New Zeland teak, a large tree (Vitex littoralis) of New Zeland; also, its hard, durable timber.
African oak
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
African or French marigold
Marigold Mar"i*gold, n. [Mary + gold.] (Bot.) A name for several plants with golden yellow blossoms, especially the Calendula officinalis (see Calendula), and the cultivated species of Tagetes. Note: There are several yellow-flowered plants of different genera bearing this name; as, the African or French marigold of the genus Tagetes, of which several species and many varieties are found in gardens. They are mostly strong-smelling herbs from South America and Mexico: bur marigold, of the genus Bidens; corn marigold, of the genus Chrysanthemum (C. segetum, a pest in the cornfields of Italy); fig marigold, of the genus Mesembryanthemum; marsh marigold, of the genus Caltha (C. palustris), commonly known in America as the cowslip. See Marsh Marigold. Marigold window. (Arch.) See Rose window, under Rose.
African pepper
Pepper Pep"per, n. [OE. peper, AS. pipor, L. piper, fr. Gr. ?, ?, akin to Skr. pippala, pippali.] 1. A well-known, pungently aromatic condiment, the dried berry, either whole or powdered, of the Piper nigrum. Note: Common, or black, pepper is made from the whole berry, dried just before maturity; white pepper is made from the ripe berry after the outer skin has been removed by maceration and friction. It has less of the peculiar properties of the plant than the black pepper. Pepper is used in medicine as a carminative stimulant. 2. (Bot.) The plant which yields pepper, an East Indian woody climber (Piper nigrum), with ovate leaves and apetalous flowers in spikes opposite the leaves. The berries are red when ripe. Also, by extension, any one of the several hundred species of the genus Piper, widely dispersed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the earth. 3. Any plant of the genus Capsicum, and its fruit; red pepper; as, the bell pepper. Note: The term pepper has been extended to various other fruits and plants, more or less closely resembling the true pepper, esp. to the common varieties of Capsicum. See Capsicum, and the Phrases, below. African pepper, the Guinea pepper. See under Guinea. Cayenne pepper. See under Cayenne. Chinese pepper, the spicy berries of the Xanthoxylum piperitum, a species of prickly ash found in China and Japan. Guinea pepper. See under Guinea, and Capsicum. Jamaica pepper. See Allspice. Long pepper. (a) The spike of berries of Piper longum, an East Indian shrub. (b) The root of Piper, or Macropiper, methysticum. See Kava. Malaguetta, or Meleguetta, pepper, the aromatic seeds of the Amomum Melegueta, an African plant of the Ginger family. They are sometimes used to flavor beer, etc., under the name of grains of Paradise. Red pepper. See Capsicum. Sweet pepper bush (Bot.), an American shrub (Clethra alnifolia), with racemes of fragrant white flowers; -- called also white alder. Pepper box or caster, a small box or bottle, with a perforated lid, used for sprinkling ground pepper on food, etc. Pepper corn. See in the Vocabulary. Pepper elder (Bot.), a West Indian name of several plants of the Pepper family, species of Piper and Peperomia. Pepper moth (Zo["o]l.), a European moth (Biston betularia) having white wings covered with small black specks. Pepper pot, a mucilaginous soup or stew of vegetables and cassareep, much esteemed in the West Indies. Pepper root. (Bot.). See Coralwort. pepper sauce, a condiment for the table, made of small red peppers steeped in vinegar. Pepper tree (Bot.), an aromatic tree (Drimys axillaris) of the Magnolia family, common in New Zealand. See Peruvian mastic tree, under Mastic.
African polecat
Zorilla o*ril"la, n. [Sp. zorilla, zorillo, dim. of zorra, zorro, a fox: cf. F. zorille.] (Zo["o]l.) Either one of two species of small African carnivores of the genus Ictonyx allied to the weasels and skunks. [Written also zoril, and zorille.] Note: The best-known species (Ictonyx zorilla) has black shiny fur with white bands and spots. It has anal glands which produce a very offensive secretion, similar to that of the skunk. It feeds upon birds and their eggs and upon small mammals, and is often very destructive to poultry. It is sometimes tamed by the natives, and kept to destroy rats and mice. Called also mariput, Cape polecat, and African polecat. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to the American skunk.
African rosewood
Rosewood Rose"wood, n. A valuable cabinet wood of a dark red color, streaked and variegated with black, obtained from several tropical leguminous trees of the genera Dalbergia and Mach[ae]rium. The finest kind is from Brazil, and is said to be from the Dalbergia nigra. African rosewood, the wood of the leguminous tree Pterocarpus erinaceus. Jamaica rosewood, the wood of two West Indian trees (Amyris balsamifera, and Linocieria ligustrina). New South Wales rosewood, the wood of Trichilia glandulosa, a tree related to the margosa.
African swallowwort
Swallowwort Swal"low*wort`, n. (Bot.) (a) See Celandine. (b) A poisonous plant (Vincetoxicum officinale) of the Milkweed family, at one time used in medicine; -- also called white swallowwort. African swallowwort, a plant of the genus Stapelia.
African teak
Teak Teak, n. [Malayalm tekku.] (Bot.) A tree of East Indies (Tectona grandis) which furnishes an extremely strong and durable timber highly valued for shipbuilding and other purposes; also, the timber of the tree. [Written also teek.] African teak, a tree (Oldfieldia Africana) of Sierra Leone; also, its very heavy and durable wood; -- called also African oak. New Zeland teak, a large tree (Vitex littoralis) of New Zeland; also, its hard, durable timber.
African teak
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
Africander
Africander Af`ri*can"der, n. One born in Africa, the offspring of a white father and a ``colored' mother. Also, and now commonly in Southern Africa, a native born of European settlers.
Africanism
Africanism Af"ri*can*ism, n. A word, phrase, idiom, or custom peculiar to Africa or Africans. ``The knotty Africanisms . . . of the fathers.' --Milton.
Africanize
Africanize Af"ri*can*ize, v. t. To place under the domination of Africans or negroes. [Amer.] --Bartlett.
Agave Americana
Amole A*mo"le, n. [Mex.] (Bot.) Any detergent plant, or the part of it used as a detergent, as the roots of Agave Americana, Chlorogalum pomeridianum, etc. [Sp. Amer. & Mex.]
Agave Americana
Sisal grass Si*sal" grass`, Sisal hemp Si*sal" hemp`, The prepared fiber of the Agave Americana, or American aloe, used for cordage; -- so called from Sisal, a port in Yucatan. See Sisal hemp, under Hemp.
Agave Americana
Pita Pi"ta, n. [Sp.] (Bot.) (a) A fiber obtained from the Agave Americana and other related species, -- used for making cordage and paper. Called also pita fiber, and pita thread. (b) The plant which yields the fiber.
Agave Americana
Century Cen"tu*ry, n.; pl. Centuries. [L. centuria (in senses 1 & 3), fr. centum a hundred: cf. F. centurie. See Cent.] 1. A hundred; as, a century of sonnets; an aggregate of a hundred things. [Archaic.] And on it said a century of prayers. --Shak. 2. A period of a hundred years; as, this event took place over two centuries ago. Note: Century, in the reckoning of time, although often used in a general way of any series of hundred consecutive years (as, a century of temperance work), usually signifies a division of the Christian era, consisting of a period of one hundred years ending with the hundredth year from which it is named; as, the first century (a. d. 1-100 inclusive); the seventh century (a.d. 601-700); the eighteenth century (a.d. 1701-1800). With words or phrases connecting it with some other system of chronology it is used of similar division of those eras; as, the first century of Rome (A.U.C. 1-100). 3. (Rom. Antiq.) (a) A division of the Roman people formed according to their property, for the purpose of voting for civil officers. (b) One of sixty companies into which a legion of the army was divided. It was Commanded by a centurion. Century plant (Bot.), the Agave Americana, formerly supposed to flower but once in a century; -- hence the name. See Agave. The Magdeburg Centuries, an ecclesiastical history of the first thirteen centuries, arranged in thirteen volumes, compiled in the 16th century by Protestant scholars at Magdeburg.
American
Nutmeg Nut"meg, n. [OE. notemuge; note nut + OF. muge musk, of the same origin as E. musk; cf. OF. noix muguette nutmeg, F. noix muscade. See Nut, and Musk.] (Bot.) The kernel of the fruit of the nutmeg tree (Myristica fragrans), a native of the Molucca Islands, but cultivated elsewhere in the tropics. Note: This fruit is a nearly spherical drupe, of the size of a pear, of a yellowish color without and almost white within. This opens into two nearly equal longitudinal valves, inclosing the nut surrounded by its aril, which is mace The nutmeg is an aromatic, very grateful to the taste and smell, and much used in cookery. Other species of Myristica yield nutmegs of inferior quality. American, Calabash, or Jamaica, nutmeg, the fruit of a tropical shrub (Monodora Myristica). It is about the size of an orange, and contains many aromatic seeds imbedded in pulp. Brazilian nutmeg, the fruit of a lauraceous tree, Cryptocarya moschata. California nutmeg, tree of the Yew family (Torreya Californica), growing in the Western United States, and having a seed which resembles a nutmeg in appearance, but is strongly impregnated with turpentine. Clove nutmeg, the Ravensara aromatica, a laura ceous tree of Madagascar. The foliage is used as a spice, but the seed is acrid and caustic. Jamaica nutmeg. See American nutmeg (above). Nutmeg bird (Zo["o]l.), an Indian finch (Munia punctularia). Nutmeg butter, a solid oil extracted from the nutmeg by expression. Nutmeg flower (Bot.), a ranunculaceous herb (Nigella sativa) with small black aromatic seeds, which are used medicinally and for excluding moths from furs and clothing. Nutmeg liver (Med.), a name applied to the liver, when, as the result of heart or lung disease, it undergoes congestion and pigmentation about the central veins of its lobules, giving it an appearance resembling that of a nutmeg. Nutmeg melon (Bot.), a small variety of muskmelon of a rich flavor. Nutmeg pigeon (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of pigeons of the genus Myristicivora, native of the East Indies and Australia. The color is usually white, or cream-white, with black on the wings and tail. Nutmeg wood (Bot.), the wood of the Palmyra palm. Peruvian nutmeg, the aromatic seed of a South American tree (Laurelia sempervirens). Plume nutmeg (Bot.), a spicy tree of Australia (Atherosperma moschata).
American
American A*mer"i*can, a. [Named from Americus Vespucius.] 1. Of or pertaining to America; as, the American continent: American Indians. 2. Of or pertaining to the United States. ``A young officer of the American navy.' --Lyell. American ivy. See Virginia creeper. American Party (U. S. Politics), a party, about 1854, which opposed the influence of foreign-born citizens, and those supposed to owe allegiance to a foreign power. Native american Party (U. S. Politics), a party of principles similar to those of the American party. It arose about 1843, but soon died out.
American
American A*mer"i*can, n. A native of America; -- originally applied to the aboriginal inhabitants, but now applied to the descendants of Europeans born in America, and especially to the citizens of the United States. The name American must always exalt the pride of patriotism. --Washington.

Meaning of Rican from wikipedia

- Puerto Rican legislature in 1906, President Theodore Roosevelt recommended that Puerto Ricans become U.S. citizens. In 1914, the Puerto Rican House of...
- Puerto Ricans, people from Puerto Rico, the inhabitants and citizens of Puerto Rico, and their descendants Puerto Rican cuisine Puerto Rican culture...
- Puerto Ricans (Spanish: Puertorriqueños; or boricuas) are the people of Puerto Rico, the inhabitants, and citizens of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (a...
- are of full or partial Puerto Rican descent. The Government of Puerto Rico has been issuing "Certificates of Puerto Rican Citizenship" to anyone born in...
- Puerto Rican cuisine has its roots in the cooking traditions and practices of Europe (mostly Spain), Africa and the native Taínos. Starting from the latter...
- Puerto Rican citizenship is the status of having citizenship of Puerto Rico as a concept distinct from having citizenship of the United States. Such a...
- progressive[pea**** term] nations in Latin America. Following the brief Costa Rican Civil War, it permanently abolished its army in 1949, becoming one of only...
- commonwealth of Puerto Rico in 1952, can be traced to 1868, when the first Puerto Rican flag, "The Revolutionary Flag of Lares", was conceived by Dr. Ramón Emeterio...
- and 2,000 BC. Other tribes, such as the Saladoid and Arawak Native Puerto Ricans, po****ted the island between 430 BC and 1000 AD. At the time of Christopher...
- Stateside Puerto Rican, also ambiguously Puerto Rican American (Spanish: puertorriqueño-americano, puertorriqueño-estadounidense), or Puerto Ricans in the United...
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