Definition of Bur. Meaning of Bur. Synonyms of Bur

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Definition of Bur

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Aburst
Aburst A*burst", adv. [Pref. a- + burst.] In a bursting condition.
Alburn
Alburn Al"burn, n. [L. alburnus, fr. L. albus white. Cf. Auburn.] (Zo["o]l.) The bleak, a small European fish having scales of a peculiarly silvery color which are used in making artificial pearls.
Alburnous
Alburnous Al*bur"nous, a. Of or pertaining to alburnum; of the alburnum; as, alburnous substances.
Alburnum
Alburnum Al*bur"num, n. [L., fr. albus white.] (Bot.) The white and softer part of wood, between the inner bark and the hard wood or duramen; sapwood.
Amburry
Amburry Am"bur*ry, n. Same as Anbury.
Ambury
Anbury An"bur*y, Ambury Am"bur*y, n. [AS. ampre, ompre, a crooked swelling vein: cf. Prov. E. amper a tumor with inflammation. Cf. the first syllable in agnail, and berry a fruit.] 1. (Far.) A soft tumor or bloody wart on horses or oxen. 2. A disease of the roots of turnips, etc.; -- called also fingers and toes.
Anbury
Anbury An"bur*y, Ambury Am"bur*y, n. [AS. ampre, ompre, a crooked swelling vein: cf. Prov. E. amper a tumor with inflammation. Cf. the first syllable in agnail, and berry a fruit.] 1. (Far.) A soft tumor or bloody wart on horses or oxen. 2. A disease of the roots of turnips, etc.; -- called also fingers and toes.
Antiburgher
Antiburgher An`ti*burgh"er, n. (Eccl. Hist.) One who seceded from the Burghers (1747), deeming it improper to take the Burgess oath.
Auburn
Auburn Au"burn, a. [OE. auburne blonde, OF. alborne, auborne, fr. LL. alburnus whitish, fr. L. albus white. Cf. Alburn.] 1. Flaxen-colored. [Obs.] --Florio. 2. Reddish brown. His auburn locks on either shoulder flowed. --Dryden.
Barnburner
Barnburner Barn"burn`er, n. [So called in allusion to the fable of the man who burned his barn in order to rid it of rats.] A member of the radical section of the Democratic party in New York, about the middle of the 19th century, which was hostile to extension of slavery, public debts, corporate privileges, etc., and supported Van Buren against Cass for president in 1848; -- opposed to Hunker. [Political Cant, U. S.]
Base-burner
Base-burner Base"-burn`er, n. A furnace or stove in which the fuel is contained in a hopper or chamber, and is fed to the fire as the lower stratum is consumed.
Bicarbureted
Bicarbureted Bi*car"bu*ret`ed or -retted -ret`ted, a. [Pref. bi- + carbureted.] (Chem.) Containing two atoms or equivalents of carbon in the molecule. [Obs. or R.]
bicarbureted hydrogen
Ethylene Eth"yl*ene (-[=e]n), n. [From Ethyl.] (Chem.) A colorless, gaseous hydrocarbon, C2H4, forming an important ingredient of illuminating gas, and also obtained by the action of concentrated sulphuric acid in alcohol. It is an unsaturated compound and combines directly with chlorine and bromine to form oily liquids (Dutch liquid), -- hence called olefiant gas. Called also ethene, elayl, and formerly, bicarbureted hydrogen.
Bicarbureted hydrogen
Note: Although a gas, hydrogen is chemically similar to the metals in its nature, having the properties of a weak base. It is, in all acids, the base which is replaced by metals and basic radicals to form salts. Like all other gases, it is condensed by great cold and pressure to a liquid which freezes and solidifies by its own evaporation. It is absorbed in large quantities by certain metals (esp. palladium), forming alloy-like compounds; hence, in view of quasi-metallic nature, it is sometimes called hydrogenium. It is the typical reducing agent, as opposed to oxidizers, as oxygen, chlorine, etc. Bicarbureted hydrogen, an old name for ethylene. Carbureted hydrogen gas. See under Carbureted. Hydrogen dioxide, a thick, colorless liquid, H2O2, resembling water, but having a bitter, sour taste, produced by the action of acids on barium peroxide. It decomposes into water and oxygen, and is manufactured in large quantities for an oxidizing and bleaching agent. Called also oxygenated water.
Black Hamburg
Black Hamburg Black Ham"burg A sweet and juicy variety of European grape, of a dark purplish black color, much grown under glass in northern latitudes.
Black Hamburg grape
Hamburg Ham"burg, n. A commercial city of Germany, near the mouth of the Elbe. Black Hamburg grape. See under Black. Hamburg edging, a kind of embroidered work done by machinery on cambric or muslin; -- used for trimming. Hamburg lake, a purplish crimson pigment resembling cochineal.
Blackburnian warbler
Blackburnian warbler Black*bur"ni*an war"bler [Named from Mrs. Blackburn, an English lady.] (Zo["o]l.) A beautiful warbler of the United States (Dendroica Blackburni[ae]). The male is strongly marked with orange, yellow, and black on the head and neck, and has an orange-yellow breast.
Brandenburg
Brandenburg Bran"den*burg, n. [So named after Brandenburg, a province and a town of Prussia.] A kind of decoration for the breast of a coat, sometimes only a frog with a loop, but in some military uniforms enlarged into a broad horizontal stripe. He wore a coat . . . trimmed with Brandenburgs. --Smollett.
Bude burner
Bude burner Bude" burn`er [See Bude light.] A burner consisting of two or more concentric Argand burners (the inner rising above the outer) and a central tube by which oxygen gas or common air is supplied.
Bur fish
Bur fish Bur" fish` (Zo["o]l.) A spinose, plectognath fish of the Allantic coast of the United States (esp. Chilo mycterus geometricus) having the power of distending its body with water or air, so as to resemble a chestnut bur; -- called also ball fish, balloon fish, and swellfish.
bur marigold
Marigold Mar"i*gold, n. [Mary + gold.] (Bot.) A name for several plants with golden yellow blossoms, especially the Calendula officinalis (see Calendula), and the cultivated species of Tagetes. Note: There are several yellow-flowered plants of different genera bearing this name; as, the African or French marigold of the genus Tagetes, of which several species and many varieties are found in gardens. They are mostly strong-smelling herbs from South America and Mexico: bur marigold, of the genus Bidens; corn marigold, of the genus Chrysanthemum (C. segetum, a pest in the cornfields of Italy); fig marigold, of the genus Mesembryanthemum; marsh marigold, of the genus Caltha (C. palustris), commonly known in America as the cowslip. See Marsh Marigold. Marigold window. (Arch.) See Rose window, under Rose.
Bur oak
Oak Oak ([=o]k), n. [OE. oke, ok, ak, AS. [=a]c; akin to D. eik, G. eiche, OHG. eih, Icel. eik, Sw. ek, Dan. eeg.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. The oaks have alternate leaves, often variously lobed, and staminate flowers in catkins. The fruit is a smooth nut, called an acorn, which is more or less inclosed in a scaly involucre called the cup or cupule. There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the northern parts of South America and Africa. Many of the oaks form forest trees of grand proportions and live many centuries. The wood is usually hard and tough, and provided with conspicuous medullary rays, forming the silver grain. 2. The strong wood or timber of the oak. Note: Among the true oaks in America are: Barren oak, or Black-jack, Q. nigra. Basket oak, Q. Michauxii. Black oak, Q. tinctoria; -- called also yellow or quercitron oak. Bur oak (see under Bur.), Q. macrocarpa; -- called also over-cup or mossy-cup oak. Chestnut oak, Q. Prinus and Q. densiflora. Chinquapin oak (see under Chinquapin), Q. prinoides. Coast live oak, Q. agrifolia, of California; -- also called enceno. Live oak (see under Live), Q. virens, the best of all for shipbuilding; also, Q. Chrysolepis, of California. Pin oak. Same as Swamp oak. Post oak, Q. obtusifolia. Red oak, Q. rubra. Scarlet oak, Q. coccinea. Scrub oak, Q. ilicifolia, Q. undulata, etc. Shingle oak, Q. imbricaria. Spanish oak, Q. falcata. Swamp Spanish oak, or Pin oak, Q. palustris. Swamp white oak, Q. bicolor. Water oak, Q. aguatica. Water white oak, Q. lyrata. Willow oak, Q. Phellos. Among the true oaks in Europe are: Bitter oak, or Turkey oak, Q. Cerris (see Cerris). Cork oak, Q. Suber. English white oak, Q. Robur. Evergreen oak, Holly oak, or Holm oak, Q. Ilex. Kermes oak, Q. coccifera. Nutgall oak, Q. infectoria. Note: Among plants called oak, but not of the genus Quercus, are: African oak, a valuable timber tree (Oldfieldia Africana). Australian, or She, oak, any tree of the genus Casuarina (see Casuarina). Indian oak, the teak tree (see Teak). Jerusalem oak. See under Jerusalem. New Zealand oak, a sapindaceous tree (Alectryon excelsum). Poison oak, the poison ivy. See under Poison.
buran
Storm Storm, n. Anticyclonic storm (Meteor.), a storm characterized by a central area of high atmospheric pressure, and having a system of winds blowing spirally outward in a direction contrary to that cyclonic storms. It is attended by low temperature, dry air, infrequent precipitation, and often by clear sky. Called also high-area storm, anticyclone. When attended by high winds, snow, and freezing temperatures such storms have various local names, as blizzard, wet norther, purga, buran, etc. Cyclonic storm. (Meteor.) A cyclone, or low-area storm. See Cyclone, above. Stovain Sto"va*in, n. Also -ine -ine . [Stove (a translation of the name of the discoverer, Fourneau + -in, -ine.] (Pharm.) A substance, C14H22O2NCl, the hydrochloride of an amino compound containing benzol, used, in solution with strychnine, as a local an[ae]sthetic, esp. by injection into the sheath of the spinal cord, producing an[ae]sthesia below the point of introduction.
burbolt
Burbot Bur"bot, n. [F. barbote, fr. barbe beard. See 1st Barb.] (Zo["o]l.) A fresh-water fish of the genus Lota, having on the nose two very small barbels, and a larger one on the chin. [Written also burbolt.] Note: The fish is also called an eelpout or ling, and is allied to the codfish. The Lota vulgaris is a common European species. An American species (L. maculosa) is found in New England, the Great Lakes, and farther north.
Burbolt
Burbolt Bur"bolt`, n. A birdbolt. [Obs.] --Ford.
Burbot
Burbot Bur"bot, n. [F. barbote, fr. barbe beard. See 1st Barb.] (Zo["o]l.) A fresh-water fish of the genus Lota, having on the nose two very small barbels, and a larger one on the chin. [Written also burbolt.] Note: The fish is also called an eelpout or ling, and is allied to the codfish. The Lota vulgaris is a common European species. An American species (L. maculosa) is found in New England, the Great Lakes, and farther north.
Burdelais
Burdelais Bur`de*lais", n. [F. bourdelais, prob. fr. bordelais. See Bordelais.] A sort of grape. --Jonson.
Burden
Burden Bur"den, n. [See Burdon.] A club. [Obs.] --Spenser.
Burden
Burden Bur"den, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Burdened; p. pr. & vb. n. Burdening.] 1. To encumber with weight (literal or figurative); to lay a heavy load upon; to load. I mean not that other men be eased, and ye burdened. --2 Cor. viii. 13. 2. To oppress with anything grievous or trying; to overload; as, to burden a nation with taxes. My burdened heart would break. --Shak. 3. To impose, as a load or burden; to lay or place as a burden (something heavy or objectionable). [R.] It is absurd to burden this act on Cromwell. --Coleridge. Syn: To load; encumber; overload; oppress.
Burdened
Burden Bur"den, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Burdened; p. pr. & vb. n. Burdening.] 1. To encumber with weight (literal or figurative); to lay a heavy load upon; to load. I mean not that other men be eased, and ye burdened. --2 Cor. viii. 13. 2. To oppress with anything grievous or trying; to overload; as, to burden a nation with taxes. My burdened heart would break. --Shak. 3. To impose, as a load or burden; to lay or place as a burden (something heavy or objectionable). [R.] It is absurd to burden this act on Cromwell. --Coleridge. Syn: To load; encumber; overload; oppress.

Meaning of Bur from wikipedia

- A bur (also spelled burr) is a seed or dry fruit or infructescence that has hooks or teeth. Some other forms of diaspores, such as the stems of certain...
- Bur, Burs or BUR may refer to: Bur, a type of seed or fruit with short, stiff bristles or hooks (also spelled "burr") MGK Bur, a Russian grenade launcher...
- Bur Dubai (in Arabic: بر دبي ) is a historic district in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, located on the western side of the Dubai Cr****. The name literally...
- Quercus macrocarpa, the bur oak, sometimes spelled burr oak, is a species of oak in the white oak section Quercus sect. Quercus, native to North America...
- BURS (bottom-up rewrite system) theory tackles the problem of taking a complex expression tree or intermediate language term and finding a good translation...
- William Frederick Burr (born June 10, 1968) is an American stand-up comedian, actor, and podcaster. Outside of stand-up, he is known for playing Patrick...
- MyAnna Buring (Swedish: [mʏ²anːa ²bʉːrɪŋ]; born 22 September 1979 as Anna Margaretha My Rantapää) is a Swedish-born, UK-based actress, known for her roles...
- The BUR Barbell Company was a privately held American physical fitness equipment manufacturer that was in operation from 1928 until 1966. The company...
- Airport, owned by the city of Ontario, CA; serves the Inland Empire. (IATA: BUR, ICAO: KBUR) Hollywood Burbank Airport, jointly owned by the cities of Burbank...
- Airport, legally and formerly marketed as Bob Hope Airport (IATA: BUR, ICAO: KBUR, FAA LID: BUR), is a public airport 3 miles (4.8 km) northwest of downtown...
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