Definition of Civil. Meaning of Civil. Synonyms of Civil

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Definition of Civil

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Civil engineering
Engineering En`gi*neer"ing, n. Originally, the art of managing engines; in its modern and extended sense, the art and science by which the mechanical properties of matter are made useful to man in structures and machines; the occupation and work of an engineer. Note: In a comprehensive sense, engineering includes architecture as a mechanical art, in distinction from architecture as a fine art. It was formerly divided into military engineering, which is the art of designing and constructing offensive and defensive works, and civil engineering, in a broad sense, as relating to other kinds of public works, machinery, etc. Civil engineering, in modern usage, is strictly the art of planning, laying out, and constructing fixed public works, such as railroads, highways, canals, aqueducts, water works, bridges, lighthouses, docks, embankments, breakwaters, dams, tunnels, etc. Mechanical engineering relates to machinery, such as steam engines, machine tools, mill work, etc. Mining engineering deals with the excavation and working of mines, and the extraction of metals from their ores, etc. Engineering is further divided into steam engineering, gas engineering, agricultural engineering, topographical engineering, electrical engineering, etc.
civil rights
Frank-law Frank"-law`, n. [Frank free + law.] (Eng. Law) The liberty of being sworn in courts, as a juror or witness; one of the ancient privileges of a freeman; free and common law; -- an obsolete expression signifying substantially the same as the American expression civil rights. --Abbot.
Civil Service Commission
Civil Service Commission Civil Service Commission In the United States, a commission appointed by the President, consisting of three members, not more than two of whom may be adherents of the same party, which has the control, through examinations, of appointments and promotions in the classified civil service. It was created by act of Jan, 16, 1883 (22 Stat. 403).
Civil Service Reform
Civil Service Reform Civil Service Reform The substitution of business principles and methods for political methods in the conduct of the civil service. esp. the merit system instead of the spoils system in making appointments to office.
Civil war
War War, n. [OE. & AS. werre; akin to OHG. werra scandal, quarrel, sedition, werran to confound, mix, D. warren, G. wirren, verwirren, to embroil, confound, disturb, and perhaps to E. worse; cf. OF. werre war, F. querre, of Teutonic origin. Cf. Guerrilla, Warrior.] 1. A contest between nations or states, carried on by force, whether for defence, for revenging insults and redressing wrongs, for the extension of commerce, for the acquisition of territory, for obtaining and establishing the superiority and dominion of one over the other, or for any other purpose; armed conflict of sovereign powers; declared and open hostilities. Men will ever distinguish war from mere bloodshed. --F. W. Robertson. Note: As war is the contest of nations or states, it always implies that such contest is authorized by the monarch or the sovereign power of the nation. A war begun by attacking another nation, is called an offensive war, and such attack is aggressive. War undertaken to repel invasion, or the attacks of an enemy, is called defensive. 2. (Law) A condition of belligerency to be maintained by physical force. In this sense, levying war against the sovereign authority is treason. 3. Instruments of war. [Poetic] His complement of stores, and total war. --Prior. 4. Forces; army. [Poetic] On their embattled ranks the waves return, And overwhelm their war. --Milton. 5. The profession of arms; the art of war. Thou art but a youth, and he is a man of war from his youth. --1 Sam. xvii. 33. 6. a state of opposition or contest; an act of opposition; an inimical contest, act, or action; enmity; hostility. ``Raised impious war in heaven.' --Milton. The words of his mouth were smoother than butter, but war was in his heart. --Ps. lv. 21. Civil war, a war between different sections or parties of the same country or nation. Holy war. See under Holy. Man of war. (Naut.) See in the Vocabulary. Public war, a war between independent sovereign states. War cry, a cry or signal used in war; as, the Indian war cry. War dance, a dance among savages preliminary to going to war. Among the North American Indians, it is begun by some distinguished chief, and whoever joins in it thereby enlists as one of the party engaged in a warlike excursion. --Schoolcraft. War field, a field of war or battle. War horse, a horse used in war; the horse of a cavalry soldier; especially, a strong, powerful, spirited horse for military service; a charger. War paint, paint put on the face and other parts of the body by savages, as a token of going to war. ``Wash the war paint from your faces.' --Longfellow. War song, a song of or pertaining to war; especially, among the American Indians, a song at the war dance, full of incitements to military ardor. War whoop, a war cry, especially that uttered by the American Indians.
Civilian
Civilian Ci*vil"ian, n. [From Civil] 1. One skilled in the civil law. Ancient civilians and writers upon government. --Swift. 2. A student of the civil law at a university or college. --R. Graves. 3. One whose pursuits are those of civil life, not military or clerical.
Civilist
Civilist Civ"il*ist, n. A civilian. [R.] --Warbur?on.
Civilizable
Civilizable Civ"i*li`za*ble, a. Capable of being civilized.
civilization
Hallstatt Hall"statt, Hallstattian Hall*stat"ti*an, a. Of or pert. to Hallstatt, Austria, or the Hallstatt civilization. Hallstatt, or Hallstattian, civilization, a prehistoric civilization of central Europe, variously dated at from 1000 to 1500 b. c. and usually associated with the Celtic or Alpine race. It was characterized by expert use of bronze, a knowledge of iron, possession of domestic animals, agriculture, and artistic skill and sentiment in manufacturing pottery, ornaments, etc. The Hallstattian civilization flourished chiefly in Carinthia, southern Germany, Switzerland, Bohemia, Silesia, Bosnia, the southeast of France, and southern Italy. --J. Deniker. H. epoch, the first iron age, represented by the Hallstatt civilization.
Civilization
Civilization Civ`i*li*za"tion, n. [Cf. F. civilisation.] 1. The act of civilizing, or the state of being civilized; national culture; refinement. Our manners, our civilization, and all the good things connected with manners, and with civilization, have, in this European world of ours, depended for ages upon two principles -- . . . the spirit of a gentleman, and spirit of religion. --Burke 2. (Law) Rendering a criminal process civil. [Obs.]
Civilize
Civilize Civ"i*lize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Civilized; p. pr. & vb. n. Civilizing.] [Cf. F. civilizer, fr.L. civilis civil. See Civil.] 1. To reclaim from a savage state; to instruct in the rules and customs of civilization; to educate; to refine. Yet blest that fate which did his arms dispose Her land to civilize, as to subdue. --Dryden 2. To admit as suitable to a civilized state. [Obs. or R.] ``Civilizing adultery.' --Milton. Syn: To polish; refine; humanize.
Civilized
Civilize Civ"i*lize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Civilized; p. pr. & vb. n. Civilizing.] [Cf. F. civilizer, fr.L. civilis civil. See Civil.] 1. To reclaim from a savage state; to instruct in the rules and customs of civilization; to educate; to refine. Yet blest that fate which did his arms dispose Her land to civilize, as to subdue. --Dryden 2. To admit as suitable to a civilized state. [Obs. or R.] ``Civilizing adultery.' --Milton. Syn: To polish; refine; humanize.
Civilized
Civilized Civ"i*lized, a. Reclaimed from savage life and manners; instructed in arts, learning, and civil manners; refined; cultivated. Sale of conscience and duty in open market is not reconcilable with the present state of civilized society. --J. Quincy.
Civilizer
Civilizer Civ"i*li*zer, n. One who, or that which, civilizes or tends to civilize.
Civilizing
Civilize Civ"i*lize, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Civilized; p. pr. & vb. n. Civilizing.] [Cf. F. civilizer, fr.L. civilis civil. See Civil.] 1. To reclaim from a savage state; to instruct in the rules and customs of civilization; to educate; to refine. Yet blest that fate which did his arms dispose Her land to civilize, as to subdue. --Dryden 2. To admit as suitable to a civilized state. [Obs. or R.] ``Civilizing adultery.' --Milton. Syn: To polish; refine; humanize.
Civily
Civily Civ"i*ly, adv. In a civil manner; as regards civil rights and privileges; politely; courteously; in a well bred manner.
Code civil
Code Code (k[=o]d), n. [F., fr. L. codex, caudex, the stock or stem of a tree, a board or tablet of wood smeared over with wax, on which the ancients originally wrote; hence, a book, a writing.] 1. A body of law, sanctioned by legislation, in which the rules of law to be specifically applied by the courts are set forth in systematic form; a compilation of laws by public authority; a digest. Note: The collection of laws made by the order of Justinian is sometimes called, by way of eminence. ``The Code' --Wharton. 2. Any system of rules or regulations relating to one subject; as, the medical code, a system of rules for the regulation of the professional conduct of physicians; the naval code, a system of rules for making communications at sea means of signals. Code civil or Code Napoleon, a code enacted in France in 1803 and 1804, embodying the law of rights of persons and of property generally. --Abbot.
Incivil
Incivil In*civ"il, a. [L. incivilis; pref. in- not + civilis civil: cf. F. incivil.] Uncivil; rude. [Obs.] --Shak.
Incivilization
Incivilization In*civ`i*li*za"tion, n. [Pref. in- not + civilization.] The state of being uncivilized; want of civilization; barbarism.
Incivilly
Incivilly In*civ"il*ly, adv. Uncivilly. [Obs.] --Shak.
Uncivil
Uncivil Un*civ"il, a. 1. Not civilized; savage; barbarous; uncivilized. Men can not enjoy the rights of an uncivil and of a civil state together. --Burke. 2. Not civil; not complaisant; discourteous; impolite; rude; unpolished; as, uncivil behavior.
Uncivility
Uncivility Un`ci*vil"i*ty, n. Incivility. [Obs.]
Uncivilization
Uncivilization Un*civ`i*li*za"tion, n. The state of being uncivilized; savagery or barbarism. [R.]
Uncivilized
Uncivilized Un*civ"i*lized, a. 1. Not civilized; not reclaimed from savage life; rude; barbarous; savage; as, the uncivilized inhabitants of Central Africa. 2. Not civil; coarse; clownish. [R.] --Addison.
Uncivilty
Uncivilty Un*civ"il*ty, adv. In an uncivil manner.

Meaning of Civil from wikipedia

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- The Latter Is an Essay Concerning The True Original, Extent, and End of Civil Government) is a work of political philosophy published anonymously in 1689...
- sequel to the 1912–13 Balkan wars. "Yugoslavia Civil War"/"Yugoslav Civil War"/"Yugoslavian Civil War"/"Civil War in Yugoslavia". Clear ethnic conflict...
- and premises only to members. Sometimes the term is used as a synonym of "civil society organization" to refer to any ****ociation founded by citizens, but...
- China and Vietnam. Other deaths resulted from disease and accidents. c. ^ Civil War: All Union casualty figures, and Confederate killed in action, from...
- with a civil war between the human colonies (led by the Babylon 5 station) and the home planet. Choosing Mars as both the spark for the civil war, and...
- A tort, in common law jurisdictions, is a civil wrong that causes someone else to suffer loss or harm resulting in legal liability for the person who...