Definition of Africa. Meaning of Africa. Synonyms of Africa

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Definition of Africa

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African
African Af"ri*can, n. A native of Africa; also one ethnologically belonging to an African race.
African
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
African hemp
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
African hemp
Hemp Hemp (h[e^]mp), n. [OE. hemp, AS. henep, h[ae]nep; akin to D. hennep, OHG. hanaf, G. hanf, Icel. hampr, Dan. hamp, Sw. hampa, L. cannabis, cannabum, Gr. ka`nnabis, ka`nnabos; cf. Russ. konoplia, Skr. [,c]a[.n]a; all prob. borrowed from some other language at an early time. Cf. Cannabine, Canvas.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Cannabis (C. sativa), the fibrous skin or bark of which is used for making cloth and cordage. The name is also applied to various other plants yielding fiber. 2. The fiber of the skin or rind of the plant, prepared for spinning. The name has also been extended to various fibers resembling the true hemp. African hemp, Bowstring hemp. See under African, and Bowstring. Bastard hemp, the Asiatic herb Datisca cannabina. Canada hemp, a species of dogbane (Apocynum cannabinum), the fiber of which was used by the Indians. Hemp agrimony, a coarse, composite herb of Europe (Eupatorium cannabinum), much like the American boneset. Hemp nettle, a plant of the genus Galeopsis (G. Tetrahit), belonging to the Mint family. Indian hemp. See under Indian, a. Manila hemp, the fiber of Musa textilis. Sisal hemp, the fiber of Agave sisalana, of Mexico and Yucatan. Sunn hemp, a fiber obtained from a leguminous plant (Crotalaria juncea). Water hemp, an annual American weed (Acnida cannabina), related to the amaranth.
African marigold
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
African oak
Oak Oak ([=o]k), n. [OE. oke, ok, ak, AS. [=a]c; akin to D. eik, G. eiche, OHG. eih, Icel. eik, Sw. ek, Dan. eeg.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. The oaks have alternate leaves, often variously lobed, and staminate flowers in catkins. The fruit is a smooth nut, called an acorn, which is more or less inclosed in a scaly involucre called the cup or cupule. There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the northern parts of South America and Africa. Many of the oaks form forest trees of grand proportions and live many centuries. The wood is usually hard and tough, and provided with conspicuous medullary rays, forming the silver grain. 2. The strong wood or timber of the oak. Note: Among the true oaks in America are: Barren oak, or Black-jack, Q. nigra. Basket oak, Q. Michauxii. Black oak, Q. tinctoria; -- called also yellow or quercitron oak. Bur oak (see under Bur.), Q. macrocarpa; -- called also over-cup or mossy-cup oak. Chestnut oak, Q. Prinus and Q. densiflora. Chinquapin oak (see under Chinquapin), Q. prinoides. Coast live oak, Q. agrifolia, of California; -- also called enceno. Live oak (see under Live), Q. virens, the best of all for shipbuilding; also, Q. Chrysolepis, of California. Pin oak. Same as Swamp oak. Post oak, Q. obtusifolia. Red oak, Q. rubra. Scarlet oak, Q. coccinea. Scrub oak, Q. ilicifolia, Q. undulata, etc. Shingle oak, Q. imbricaria. Spanish oak, Q. falcata. Swamp Spanish oak, or Pin oak, Q. palustris. Swamp white oak, Q. bicolor. Water oak, Q. aguatica. Water white oak, Q. lyrata. Willow oak, Q. Phellos. Among the true oaks in Europe are: Bitter oak, or Turkey oak, Q. Cerris (see Cerris). Cork oak, Q. Suber. English white oak, Q. Robur. Evergreen oak, Holly oak, or Holm oak, Q. Ilex. Kermes oak, Q. coccifera. Nutgall oak, Q. infectoria. Note: Among plants called oak, but not of the genus Quercus, are: African oak, a valuable timber tree (Oldfieldia Africana). Australian, or She, oak, any tree of the genus Casuarina (see Casuarina). Indian oak, the teak tree (see Teak). Jerusalem oak. See under Jerusalem. New Zealand oak, a sapindaceous tree (Alectryon excelsum). Poison oak, the poison ivy. See under Poison.
African oak
Teak Teak, n. [Malayalm tekku.] (Bot.) A tree of East Indies (Tectona grandis) which furnishes an extremely strong and durable timber highly valued for shipbuilding and other purposes; also, the timber of the tree. [Written also teek.] African teak, a tree (Oldfieldia Africana) of Sierra Leone; also, its very heavy and durable wood; -- called also African oak. New Zeland teak, a large tree (Vitex littoralis) of New Zeland; also, its hard, durable timber.
African oak
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
African or French marigold
Marigold Mar"i*gold, n. [Mary + gold.] (Bot.) A name for several plants with golden yellow blossoms, especially the Calendula officinalis (see Calendula), and the cultivated species of Tagetes. Note: There are several yellow-flowered plants of different genera bearing this name; as, the African or French marigold of the genus Tagetes, of which several species and many varieties are found in gardens. They are mostly strong-smelling herbs from South America and Mexico: bur marigold, of the genus Bidens; corn marigold, of the genus Chrysanthemum (C. segetum, a pest in the cornfields of Italy); fig marigold, of the genus Mesembryanthemum; marsh marigold, of the genus Caltha (C. palustris), commonly known in America as the cowslip. See Marsh Marigold. Marigold window. (Arch.) See Rose window, under Rose.
African pepper
Pepper Pep"per, n. [OE. peper, AS. pipor, L. piper, fr. Gr. ?, ?, akin to Skr. pippala, pippali.] 1. A well-known, pungently aromatic condiment, the dried berry, either whole or powdered, of the Piper nigrum. Note: Common, or black, pepper is made from the whole berry, dried just before maturity; white pepper is made from the ripe berry after the outer skin has been removed by maceration and friction. It has less of the peculiar properties of the plant than the black pepper. Pepper is used in medicine as a carminative stimulant. 2. (Bot.) The plant which yields pepper, an East Indian woody climber (Piper nigrum), with ovate leaves and apetalous flowers in spikes opposite the leaves. The berries are red when ripe. Also, by extension, any one of the several hundred species of the genus Piper, widely dispersed throughout the tropical and subtropical regions of the earth. 3. Any plant of the genus Capsicum, and its fruit; red pepper; as, the bell pepper. Note: The term pepper has been extended to various other fruits and plants, more or less closely resembling the true pepper, esp. to the common varieties of Capsicum. See Capsicum, and the Phrases, below. African pepper, the Guinea pepper. See under Guinea. Cayenne pepper. See under Cayenne. Chinese pepper, the spicy berries of the Xanthoxylum piperitum, a species of prickly ash found in China and Japan. Guinea pepper. See under Guinea, and Capsicum. Jamaica pepper. See Allspice. Long pepper. (a) The spike of berries of Piper longum, an East Indian shrub. (b) The root of Piper, or Macropiper, methysticum. See Kava. Malaguetta, or Meleguetta, pepper, the aromatic seeds of the Amomum Melegueta, an African plant of the Ginger family. They are sometimes used to flavor beer, etc., under the name of grains of Paradise. Red pepper. See Capsicum. Sweet pepper bush (Bot.), an American shrub (Clethra alnifolia), with racemes of fragrant white flowers; -- called also white alder. Pepper box or caster, a small box or bottle, with a perforated lid, used for sprinkling ground pepper on food, etc. Pepper corn. See in the Vocabulary. Pepper elder (Bot.), a West Indian name of several plants of the Pepper family, species of Piper and Peperomia. Pepper moth (Zo["o]l.), a European moth (Biston betularia) having white wings covered with small black specks. Pepper pot, a mucilaginous soup or stew of vegetables and cassareep, much esteemed in the West Indies. Pepper root. (Bot.). See Coralwort. pepper sauce, a condiment for the table, made of small red peppers steeped in vinegar. Pepper tree (Bot.), an aromatic tree (Drimys axillaris) of the Magnolia family, common in New Zealand. See Peruvian mastic tree, under Mastic.
African polecat
Zorilla o*ril"la, n. [Sp. zorilla, zorillo, dim. of zorra, zorro, a fox: cf. F. zorille.] (Zo["o]l.) Either one of two species of small African carnivores of the genus Ictonyx allied to the weasels and skunks. [Written also zoril, and zorille.] Note: The best-known species (Ictonyx zorilla) has black shiny fur with white bands and spots. It has anal glands which produce a very offensive secretion, similar to that of the skunk. It feeds upon birds and their eggs and upon small mammals, and is often very destructive to poultry. It is sometimes tamed by the natives, and kept to destroy rats and mice. Called also mariput, Cape polecat, and African polecat. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to the American skunk.
African rosewood
Rosewood Rose"wood, n. A valuable cabinet wood of a dark red color, streaked and variegated with black, obtained from several tropical leguminous trees of the genera Dalbergia and Mach[ae]rium. The finest kind is from Brazil, and is said to be from the Dalbergia nigra. African rosewood, the wood of the leguminous tree Pterocarpus erinaceus. Jamaica rosewood, the wood of two West Indian trees (Amyris balsamifera, and Linocieria ligustrina). New South Wales rosewood, the wood of Trichilia glandulosa, a tree related to the margosa.
African swallowwort
Swallowwort Swal"low*wort`, n. (Bot.) (a) See Celandine. (b) A poisonous plant (Vincetoxicum officinale) of the Milkweed family, at one time used in medicine; -- also called white swallowwort. African swallowwort, a plant of the genus Stapelia.
African teak
Teak Teak, n. [Malayalm tekku.] (Bot.) A tree of East Indies (Tectona grandis) which furnishes an extremely strong and durable timber highly valued for shipbuilding and other purposes; also, the timber of the tree. [Written also teek.] African teak, a tree (Oldfieldia Africana) of Sierra Leone; also, its very heavy and durable wood; -- called also African oak. New Zeland teak, a large tree (Vitex littoralis) of New Zeland; also, its hard, durable timber.
African teak
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
Africander
Africander Af`ri*can"der, n. One born in Africa, the offspring of a white father and a ``colored' mother. Also, and now commonly in Southern Africa, a native born of European settlers.
Africanism
Africanism Af"ri*can*ism, n. A word, phrase, idiom, or custom peculiar to Africa or Africans. ``The knotty Africanisms . . . of the fathers.' --Milton.
Africanize
Africanize Af"ri*can*ize, v. t. To place under the domination of Africans or negroes. [Amer.] --Bartlett.
Bos or Bibos Africanus
Sanga San"ga, Sangu San"gu, n. (Zo["o]l.) The Abyssinian ox (Bos or Bibos, Africanus), noted for the great length of its horns. It has a hump on its back.
Eurafrican
Eurafric Eur*af"ric, Eurafrican Eur*af"ri*can, a. [Europe + Afric, African.] 1. (Geog.) Of, pertaining to, or designating, the continents of Europe and Africa combined. 2. (Zo["o]geography) Pert. to or designating a region including most of Europe and northern Africa south to the Sahara. 3. Of European and African descent.
Oldfieldia Africana
Oak Oak ([=o]k), n. [OE. oke, ok, ak, AS. [=a]c; akin to D. eik, G. eiche, OHG. eih, Icel. eik, Sw. ek, Dan. eeg.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. The oaks have alternate leaves, often variously lobed, and staminate flowers in catkins. The fruit is a smooth nut, called an acorn, which is more or less inclosed in a scaly involucre called the cup or cupule. There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the northern parts of South America and Africa. Many of the oaks form forest trees of grand proportions and live many centuries. The wood is usually hard and tough, and provided with conspicuous medullary rays, forming the silver grain. 2. The strong wood or timber of the oak. Note: Among the true oaks in America are: Barren oak, or Black-jack, Q. nigra. Basket oak, Q. Michauxii. Black oak, Q. tinctoria; -- called also yellow or quercitron oak. Bur oak (see under Bur.), Q. macrocarpa; -- called also over-cup or mossy-cup oak. Chestnut oak, Q. Prinus and Q. densiflora. Chinquapin oak (see under Chinquapin), Q. prinoides. Coast live oak, Q. agrifolia, of California; -- also called enceno. Live oak (see under Live), Q. virens, the best of all for shipbuilding; also, Q. Chrysolepis, of California. Pin oak. Same as Swamp oak. Post oak, Q. obtusifolia. Red oak, Q. rubra. Scarlet oak, Q. coccinea. Scrub oak, Q. ilicifolia, Q. undulata, etc. Shingle oak, Q. imbricaria. Spanish oak, Q. falcata. Swamp Spanish oak, or Pin oak, Q. palustris. Swamp white oak, Q. bicolor. Water oak, Q. aguatica. Water white oak, Q. lyrata. Willow oak, Q. Phellos. Among the true oaks in Europe are: Bitter oak, or Turkey oak, Q. Cerris (see Cerris). Cork oak, Q. Suber. English white oak, Q. Robur. Evergreen oak, Holly oak, or Holm oak, Q. Ilex. Kermes oak, Q. coccifera. Nutgall oak, Q. infectoria. Note: Among plants called oak, but not of the genus Quercus, are: African oak, a valuable timber tree (Oldfieldia Africana). Australian, or She, oak, any tree of the genus Casuarina (see Casuarina). Indian oak, the teak tree (see Teak). Jerusalem oak. See under Jerusalem. New Zealand oak, a sapindaceous tree (Alectryon excelsum). Poison oak, the poison ivy. See under Poison.
Oldfieldia Africana
Teak Teak, n. [Malayalm tekku.] (Bot.) A tree of East Indies (Tectona grandis) which furnishes an extremely strong and durable timber highly valued for shipbuilding and other purposes; also, the timber of the tree. [Written also teek.] African teak, a tree (Oldfieldia Africana) of Sierra Leone; also, its very heavy and durable wood; -- called also African oak. New Zeland teak, a large tree (Vitex littoralis) of New Zeland; also, its hard, durable timber.
Oldfieldia Africana
African Af"ri*can, a. [L. Africus, Africanus, fr. Afer African.] Of or pertaining to Africa. African hemp, a fiber prepared from the leaves of the Sanseviera Guineensis, a plant found in Africa and India. African marigold, a tropical American plant (Tagetes erecta). African oak or African teak, a timber furnished by Oldfieldia Africana, used in ship building.
South African prune
Prune Prune, n. [F. prune, from L. prunum a plum. See Plum.] A plum; esp., a dried plum, used in cookery; as, French or Turkish prunes; California prunes. German prune (Bot.), a large dark purple plum, of oval shape, often one-sided. It is much used for preserving, either dried or in sirup. Prune tree. (Bot.) (a) A tree of the genus Prunus (P. domestica), which produces prunes. (b) The West Indian tree, Prunus occidentalis. South African prune (Bot.), the edible fruit of a sapindaceous tree (Pappea Capensis).

Meaning of Africa from wikipedia

- Africa is the world's second largest and second most-populous continent (behind Asia in both categories). At about 30.3 million km2 (11.7 million square miles)...
- South Africa, officially the Republic of South Africa (RSA), is the southernmost country in Africa. It is bounded to the south by 2,798 kilometres (1,739 mi)...
- Union African art African jazz (disambiguation) African cuisine African culture African languages African music African Union African Race The African (essay)...
- The sub-Saharan Africa is, geographically, the area of the continent of Africa that lies south of the Sahara. According to the United Nations, it consists...
- This Is Africa is an English-language bi-monthly business publication owned by The Financial Times Ltd and edited in London. It examines African business...
- The African Union (AU) is a continental union consisting of 55 countries of the continent of Africa, with exception of various territories of European...
- Africa for Africa is an album by Nigerian musician Femi Kuti, released in 2010 on Wr****e Records. The album was also released in 2011 on Knitting Factory...
- The term "North Africa" has no single accepted definition. It is sometimes defined as stretching from the Atlantic s****s of Morocco in the west, to Egypt's...
- West Africa is the westernmost region of Africa. West Africa has been defined as including 17 countries: Benin, Burkina Faso, the island nation of Cape...
- Northeast Africa and East Africa; the Ari po****tions in Northeast Africa; the Niger-Congo-speaking po****tions in West-Central Africa, West Africa, East...
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