Definition of Oyster. Meaning of Oyster. Synonyms of Oyster

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Oyster. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Oyster and, of course, Oyster synonyms and on the right images related to the word Oyster.

Definition of Oyster

No result for Oyster. Showing similar results...

Escaloped oysters
Escaloped Es*cal"oped, a. 1. Cut or marked in the form of an escalop; scalloped. 2. (Her.) Covered with a pattern resembling a series of escalop shells, each of which issues from between two others. Its appearance is that of a surface covered with scales. Escaloped oysters (Cookery). See under Scalloped.
hammer oyster
Hammer Ham"mer, n. [OE. hamer, AS. hamer, hamor; akin to D. hamer, G. & Dan. hammer, Sw. hammare, Icel. hamarr, hammer, crag, and perh. to Gr. ? anvil, Skr. a?man stone.] 1. An instrument for driving nails, beating metals, and the like, consisting of a head, usually of steel or iron, fixed crosswise to a handle. With busy hammers closing rivets up. --Shak. 2. Something which in firm or action resembles the common hammer; as: (a) That part of a clock which strikes upon the bell to indicate the hour. (b) The padded mallet of a piano, which strikes the wires, to produce the tones. (c) (Anat.) The malleus. See under Ear. (Gun.) That part of a gunlock which strikes the percussion cap, or firing pin; the cock; formerly, however, a piece of steel covering the pan of a flintlock musket and struck by the flint of the cock to ignite the priming. (e) Also, a person of thing that smites or shatters; as, St. Augustine was the hammer of heresies. He met the stern legionaries [of Rome] who had been the ``massive iron hammers' of the whole earth. --J. H. Newman. Atmospheric hammer, a dead-stroke hammer in which the spring is formed by confined air. Drop hammer, Face hammer, etc. See under Drop, Face, etc. Hammer fish. See Hammerhead. Hammer hardening, the process of hardening metal by hammering it when cold. Hammer shell (Zo["o]l.), any species of Malleus, a genus of marine bivalve shells, allied to the pearl oysters, having the wings narrow and elongated, so as to give them a hammer-shaped outline; -- called also hammer oyster. To bring to the hammer, to put up at auction.
oyster fish
Toadfish Toad"fish`, n. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any marine fish of the genus Batrachus, having a large, thick head and a wide mouth, and bearing some resemblance to a toad. The American species (Batrachus tau) is very common in shallow water. Called also oyster fish, and sapo. (b) The angler. (c) A swellfish.
Oyster-green
Oyster-green Oys"ter-green`, n. (Bot.) A green membranous seaweed (Ulva) often found growing on oysters but common on stones, piles, etc.
Oystering
Oystering Oys"ter*ing, n. Gathering, or dredging for, oysters.
Oysterling
Oysterling Oys"ter*ling, n. (Zo["o]l.) A young oyster.
Royster
Royster Roys"ter, Roysterer Roys"ter*er, n. same as Roister, Roisterer.
Roysterer
Royster Roys"ter, Roysterer Roys"ter*er, n. same as Roister, Roisterer.
Scalloped oysters
Scalloped Scal"loped, a. 1. Furnished with a scallop; made or done with or in a scallop. 2. Having the edge or border cut or marked with segments of circles. See Scallop, n., 2. 3. (Cookery) Baked in a scallop; cooked with crumbs. Scalloped oysters (Cookery), opened oysters baked in a deep dish with alternate layers of bread or cracker crumbs, seasoned with pepper, nutmeg, and butter. This was at first done in scallop shells.
Seed oyster
Seed Seed, n.; pl. Seed or Seeds. [OE. seed, sed, AS. s?d, fr. s[=a]wan to sow; akin to D. zaad seed, G. saat, Icel. s[=a]?, s??i, Goth. manas?ps seed of men. world. See Sow to scatter seed, and cf. Colza.] 1. (Bot.) (a) A ripened ovule, consisting of an embryo with one or more integuments, or coverings; as, an apple seed; a currant seed. By germination it produces a new plant. (b) Any small seedlike fruit, though it may consist of a pericarp, or even a calyx, as well as the seed proper; as, parsnip seed; thistle seed. And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself. --Gen. i. 11. Note: The seed proper has an outer and an inner coat, and within these the kernel or nucleus. The kernel is either the embryo alone, or the embryo inclosed in the albumen, which is the material for the nourishment of the developing embryo. The scar on a seed, left where the stem parted from it, is called the hilum, and the closed orifice of the ovule, the micropyle. 2. (Physiol.) The generative fluid of the male; semen; sperm; -- not used in the plural. 3. That from which anything springs; first principle; original; source; as, the seeds of virtue or vice. 4. The principle of production. Praise of great acts he scatters as a seed, Which may the like in coming ages breed. --Waller. 5. Progeny; offspring; children; descendants; as, the seed of Abraham; the seed of David. Note: In this sense the word is applied to one person, or to any number collectively, and admits of the plural form, though rarely used in the plural. 6. Race; generation; birth. Of mortal seed they were not held. --Waller. Seed bag (Artesian well), a packing to prevent percolation of water down the bore hole. It consists of a bag encircling the tubing and filled with flax seed, which swells when wet and fills the space between the tubing and the sides of the hole. Seed bud (Bot.), the germ or rudiment of the plant in the embryo state; the ovule. Seed coat (Bot.), the covering of a seed. Seed corn, or Seed grain (Bot.), corn or grain for seed. Seed down (Bot.), the soft hairs on certain seeds, as cotton seed. Seed drill. See 6th Drill, 2 (a) . Seed eater (Zo["o]l.), any finch of the genera Sporophila, and Crithagra. They feed mainly on seeds. Seed gall (Zo["o]l.), any gall which resembles a seed, formed, on the leaves of various plants, usually by some species of Phylloxera. Seed leaf (Bot.), a cotyledon. Seed lobe (Bot.), a cotyledon; a seed leaf. Seed oil, oil expressed from the seeds of plants. Seed oyster, a young oyster, especially when of a size suitable for transplantation to a new locality. Seed pearl, a small pearl of little value. Seed plat, or Seed plot, the ground on which seeds are sown, to produce plants for transplanting; a nursery. Seed stalk (Bot.), the stalk of an ovule or seed; a funicle. Seed tick (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of ticks resembling seeds in form and color. Seed vessel (Bot.), that part of a plant which contains the seeds; a pericarp. Seed weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous small weevels, especially those of the genus Apion, which live in the seeds of various plants. Seed wool, cotton wool not yet cleansed of its seeds. [Southern U.S.]
Window oyster
Window frame, the frame of a window which receives and holds the sashes or casement. Window glass, panes of glass for windows; the kind of glass used in windows. Window martin (Zo["o]l.), the common European martin. [Prov. Eng.] Window oyster (Zo["o]l.), a marine bivalve shell (Placuna placenta) native of the East Indies and China. Its valves are very broad, thin, and translucent, and are said to have been used formerly in place of glass. Window pane. (a) (Arch.) See Pane, n., 3 (b) . (b) (Zo["o]l.) See Windowpane, in the Vocabulary. Window sash, the sash, or light frame, in which panes of glass are set for windows. Window seat, a seat arranged in the recess of a window. See Window stool, under Stool. Window shade, a shade or blind for a window; usually, one that is hung on a roller. Window shell (Zo["o]l.), the window oyster. Window shutter, a shutter or blind used to close or darken windows. Window sill (Arch.), the flat piece of wood, stone, or the like, at the bottom of a window frame. Window swallow (Zo["o]l.), the common European martin. [Prov. Eng.] Window tax, a tax or duty formerly levied on all windows, or openings for light, above the number of eight in houses standing in cities or towns. [Eng.]

Meaning of Oyster from wikipedia

- Saccostrea. Examples include the Belon oyster, eastern oyster, Olympia oyster, Pacific oyster, and the Sydney rock oyster. Almost all s****-bearing mollusks...
- The Oyster card is a form of electronic ticket used on public transport in Greater London in the United Kingdom. It is promoted by Transport for London...
- Oyster sauce describes a number of sauces made by cooking oysters. The most common in modern use is a viscous dark brown condiment made from oyster extracts...
- similarly cultivated king oyster mushroom. Oyster mushrooms can also be used industrially for mycoremediation purposes. The oyster mushroom is one of the...
- Blue Öyster Cult (often abbreviated BÖC or BOC) is an American rock band formed on Long Island, New York, in 1967, whose most successful work includes...
- Oyster crackers are small, salted crackers, typically rounds about 0.6 in (15 mm) in diameter, although a slightly smaller hexagonal variety is also prevalent...
- Oystering or oyster veneer is a decorative form of veneering, a type of parquetry. This technique is using thin slices of wood branches or roots cut in...
- Oysters are two small, round pieces of dark meat on the back of poultry near the thigh, in the hollow on the dorsal side of the ilium bone. Some regard...
- eastern oyster (Cr****ostrea virginica)—also called Wellfleet oyster, Atlantic oyster, Virginia oyster, or American oyster—is a species of true oyster native...
- Pinctada is a genus of sal****er oysters, marine bivalve mollusks in the family Pteriidae, the pearl oysters. These oysters have a strong inner s**** layer...
Loading...