Definition of LIQUOR. Meaning of LIQUOR. Synonyms of LIQUOR

Definition of LIQUOR. Meaning of LIQUOR. Synonyms of LIQUOR

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word LIQUOR. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word LIQUOR and, of course, LIQUOR synonyms and on the right images related to the word LIQUOR.

Definition of LIQUOR

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fuming liquor of Libavius
Stannic Stan"nic, a. [L. stannum tin: cf. F. stannique.] (Chem.) Of or pertaining to tin; derived from or containing tin; specifically, designating those compounds in which the element has a higher valence as contrasted with stannous compounds. Stannic acid. (a) A hypothetical substance, Sn(OH)4, analogous to silic acid, and called also normal stannic acid. (b) Metastannic acid. Stannic chloride, a thin, colorless, fuming liquid, SnCl4, used as a mordant in calico printing and dyeing; -- formerly called spirit of tin, or fuming liquor of Libavius. Stannic oxide, tin oxide, SnO2, produced artificially as a white amorphous powder, and occurring naturally in the mineral cassiterite. It is used in the manufacture of white enamels, and, under the name of putty powder, for polishing glass, etc.
gas liquor
Gas fitter, one who lays pipes and puts up fixtures for gas. Gas fitting. (a) The occupation of a gas fitter. (b) pl. The appliances needed for the introduction of gas into a building, as meters, pipes, burners, etc. Gas fixture, a device for conveying illuminating or combustible gas from the pipe to the gas-burner, consisting of an appendage of cast, wrought, or drawn metal, with tubes upon which the burners, keys, etc., are adjusted. Gas generator, an apparatus in which gas is evolved; as: (a) a retort in which volatile hydrocarbons are evolved by heat; (b) a machine in which air is saturated with the vapor of liquid hydrocarbon; a carburetor; (c) a machine for the production of carbonic acid gas, for a["e]rating water, bread, etc. --Knight. Gas jet, a flame of illuminating gas. Gas machine, an apparatus for carbureting air for use as illuminating gas. Gas meter, an instrument for recording the quantity of gas consumed in a given time, at a particular place. Gas retort, a retort which contains the coal and other materials, and in which the gas is generated, in the manufacture of gas. Gas stove, a stove for cooking or other purposes, heated by gas. Gas tar, coal tar. Gas trap, a drain trap; a sewer trap. See 4th Trap, 5. Gas washer (Gas Works), an apparatus within which gas from the condenser is brought in contact with a falling stream of water, to precipitate the tar remaining in it. --Knight. Gas water, water through which gas has been passed for purification; -- called also gas liquor and ammoniacal water, and used for the manufacture of sal ammoniac, carbonate of ammonia, and Prussian blue. --Tomlinson. Gas well, a deep boring, from which natural gas is discharged. --Raymond. Gas works, a manufactory of gas, with all the machinery and appurtenances; a place where gas is generated for lighting cities. Laughing gas. See under Laughing. Marsh gas (Chem.), a light, combustible, gaseous hydrocarbon, CH4, produced artificially by the dry distillation of many organic substances, and occurring as a natural product of decomposition in stagnant pools, whence its name. It is an abundant ingredient of ordinary illuminating gas, and is the first member of the paraffin series. Called also methane, and in coal mines, fire damp. Natural gas, gas obtained from wells, etc., in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and elsewhere, and largely used for fuel and illuminating purposes. It is chiefly derived from the Coal Measures. Olefiant gas (Chem.). See Ethylene. Water gas (Chem.), a kind of gas made by forcing steam over glowing coals, whereby there results a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This gives a gas of intense heating power, but destitute of light-giving properties, and which is charged by passing through some volatile hydrocarbon, as gasoline.
Liquor of flints
Flint Flint, n. [AS. flint, akin to Sw. flinta, Dan. flint; cf. OHG. flins flint, G. flinte gun (cf. E. flintlock), perh. akin to Gr. ? brick. Cf. Plinth.] 1. (Min.) A massive, somewhat impure variety of quartz, in color usually of a gray to brown or nearly black, breaking with a conchoidal fracture and sharp edge. It is very hard, and strikes fire with steel. 2. A piece of flint for striking fire; -- formerly much used, esp. in the hammers of gun locks. 3. Anything extremely hard, unimpressible, and unyielding, like flint. ``A heart of flint.' --Spenser. Flint age. (Geol.) Same as Stone age, under Stone. Flint brick, a fire made principially of powdered silex. Flint glass. See in the Vocabulary. Flint implements (Arch[ae]ol.), tools, etc., employed by men before the use of metals, such as axes, arrows, spears, knives, wedges, etc., which were commonly made of flint, but also of granite, jade, jasper, and other hard stones. Flint mill. (a) (Pottery) A mill in which flints are ground. (b) (Mining) An obsolete appliance for lighting the miner at his work, in which flints on a revolving wheel were made to produce a shower of sparks, which gave light, but did not inflame the fire damp. --Knight. Flint stone, a hard, siliceous stone; a flint. Flint wall, a kind of wall, common in England, on the face of which are exposed the black surfaces of broken flints set in the mortar, with quions of masonry. Liquor of flints, a solution of silica, or flints, in potash. To skin a flint, to be capable of, or guilty of, any expedient or any meanness for making money. [Colloq.]
liquorice
Licorice Lic"o*rice (l[i^]k"[-o]*r[i^]s), n. [OE. licoris, through old French, fr. L. liquiritia, corrupted fr. glycyrrhiza, Gr. glyky`rriza; glyky`s sweet + "ri`za root. Cf. Glycerin, Glycyrrhiza, Wort.] [Written also liquorice.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Glycyrrhiza (G. glabra), the root of which abounds with a sweet juice, and is much used in demulcent compositions. 2. The inspissated juice of licorice root, used as a confection and for medicinal purposes. Licorice fern (Bot.), a name of several kinds of polypody which have rootstocks of a sweetish flavor. Licorice sugar. (Chem.) See Glycyrrhizin. Licorice weed (Bot.), the tropical plant Scapania dulcis. Mountain licorice (Bot.), a kind of clover (Trifolium alpinum), found in the Alps. It has large purplish flowers and a sweetish perennial rootstock. Wild licorice. (Bot.) (a) The North American perennial herb Glycyrrhiza lepidota. (b) Certain broad-leaved cleavers (Galium circ[ae]zans and G. lanceolatum). (c) The leguminous climber Abrus precatorius, whose scarlet and black seeds are called black-eyed Susans. Its roots are used as a substitute for those of true licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra).
Liquorice
Liquorice Liq"uor*ice (l[i^]k"[~e]r*[i^]s), n. See Licorice.
Liquorish
Liquorish Liq"uor*ish, a. See Lickerish. [Obs.] --Shak.
Liquorous
Liquorous Liq"uor*ous (-[u^]s), a. Eagerly desirous. See Lickerish. [Obs.] --Marston.
Malt liquor
Malt Malt, a. Relating to, containing, or made with, malt. Malt liquor, an alcoholic liquor, as beer, ale, porter, etc., prepared by fermenting an infusion of malt. Malt dust, fine particles of malt, or of the grain used in making malt; -- used as a fertilizer. `` Malt dust consists chiefly of the infant radicle separated from the grain.' --Sir H. Davy. Malt floor, a floor for drying malt. Malt house, or Malthouse, a house in which malt is made. Malt kiln, a heated chamber for drying malt.
Red liquor
Red horse. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any large American red fresh-water sucker, especially Moxostoma macrolepidotum and allied species. (b) See the Note under Drumfish. Red lead. (Chem) See under Lead, and Minium. Red-lead ore. (Min.) Same as Crocoite. Red liquor (Dyeing), a solution consisting essentially of aluminium acetate, used as a mordant in the fixation of dyestuffs on vegetable fiber; -- so called because used originally for red dyestuffs. Called also red mordant. Red maggot (Zo["o]l.), the larva of the wheat midge. Red manganese. (Min.) Same as Rhodochrosite. Red man, one of the American Indians; -- so called from his color. Red maple (Bot.), a species of maple (Acer rubrum). See Maple. Red mite. (Zo["o]l.) See Red spider, below. Red mulberry (Bot.), an American mulberry of a dark purple color (Morus rubra). Red mullet (Zo["o]l.), the surmullet. See Mullet. Red ocher (Min.), a soft earthy variety of hematite, of a reddish color. Red perch (Zo["o]l.), the rosefish. Red phosphorus. (Chem.) See under Phosphorus. Red pine (Bot.), an American species of pine (Pinus resinosa); -- so named from its reddish bark. Red precipitate. See under Precipitate. Red Republican (European Politics), originally, one who maintained extreme republican doctrines in France, -- because a red liberty cap was the badge of the party; an extreme radical in social reform. [Cant] Red ribbon, the ribbon of the Order of the Bath in England. Red sanders. (Bot.) See Sanders. Red sandstone. (Geol.) See under Sandstone. Red scale (Zo["o]l.), a scale insect (Aspidiotus aurantii) very injurious to the orange tree in California and Australia. Red silver (Min.), an ore of silver, of a ruby-red or reddish black color. It includes proustite, or light red silver, and pyrargyrite, or dark red silver. Red snapper (Zo["o]l.), a large fish (Lutlanus aya or Blackfordii) abundant in the Gulf of Mexico and about the Florida reefs. Red snow, snow colored by a mocroscopic unicellular alga (Protococcus nivalis) which produces large patches of scarlet on the snows of arctic or mountainous regions. Red softening (Med.) a form of cerebral softening in which the affected parts are red, -- a condition due either to infarction or inflammation. Red spider (Zo["o]l.), a very small web-spinning mite (Tetranychus telarius) which infests, and often destroys, plants of various kinds, especially those cultivated in houses and conservatories. It feeds mostly on the under side of the leaves, and causes them to turn yellow and die. The adult insects are usually pale red. Called also red mite. Red squirrel (Zo["o]l.), the chickaree. Red tape, the tape used in public offices for tying up documents, etc.; hence, official formality and delay.
Tin liquor
Tin Tin, n. [As. tin; akin to D. tin, G. zinn, OHG. zin, Icel. & Dan. tin, Sw. tenn; of unknown origin.] 1. (Chem.) An elementary substance found as an oxide in the mineral cassiterite, and reduced as a soft white crystalline metal, malleable at ordinary temperatures, but brittle when heated. It is not easily oxidized in the air, and is used chiefly to coat iron to protect it from rusting, in the form of tin foil with mercury to form the reflective surface of mirrors, and in solder, bronze, speculum metal, and other alloys. Its compounds are designated as stannous, or stannic. Symbol Sn (Stannum). Atomic weight 117.4. 2. Thin plates of iron covered with tin; tin plate. 3. Money. [Cant] --Beaconsfield. Block tin (Metal.), commercial tin, cast into blocks, and partially refined, but containing small quantities of various impurities, as copper, lead, iron, arsenic, etc.; solid tin as distinguished from tin plate; -- called also bar tin. Butter of tin. (Old Chem.) See Fuming liquor of Libavius, under Fuming. Grain tin. (Metal.) See under Grain. Salt of tin (Dyeing), stannous chloride, especially so called when used as a mordant. Stream tin. See under Stream. Tin cry (Chem.), the peculiar creaking noise made when a bar of tin is bent. It is produced by the grating of the crystal granules on each other. Tin foil, tin reduced to a thin leaf. Tin frame (Mining), a kind of buddle used in washing tin ore. Tin liquor, Tin mordant (Dyeing), stannous chloride, used as a mordant in dyeing and calico printing. Tin penny, a customary duty in England, formerly paid to tithingmen for liberty to dig in tin mines. [Obs.] --Bailey. Tin plate, thin sheet iron coated with tin. Tin pyrites. See Stannite.
Unliquored
Unliquored Un*liq"uored, a. 1. Not moistened or wet with liquor; dry. ``Unliquored coach.' --Bp. Hall. 2. Not in liquor; not intoxicated; sober. Like an unliquored Silenus. --Milton.

Meaning of LIQUOR from wikipedia

- Liquor (also hard liquor, hard alcohol, spirit, or distilled drink) is an alcoholic drink produced by distillation of grains, fruit, or vegetables that...
- Malt liquor, in North America, is beer with high alcohol content. Legally, it often includes any alcoholic beverage with 5% or more alcohol by volume made...
- drink or rail drink is an alcoholic beverage served using the lower-cost liquors stored within easy reach of the bartender in the counter 'speed rail' or...
- nicknames, including white liquor, white lightning, mountain dew, choop, hooch, homebrew, ‘’’shinney’’’, white whiskey, and mash liquor. The word "moonshine"...
- A liquor store is a retail shop that predominantly sells prepackaged alcoholic beveragestypically in bottlesintended to be consumed off the store's...
- Chocolate liquor (cocoa liquor) is pure cocoa m**** in solid or semi-solid form. Like the cocoa beans (nibs) from which it is produced, it contains both...
- A liquor license is a permit to sell alcoholic beverages. In Canada, liquor licences are issued by the legal authority of each province to allow an...
- Pot liquor, sometimes spelled potlikker or pot likker is the liquid that is left behind after boiling greens (collard greens, mustard greens, turnip greens)...
- category of at least a dozen Chinese liquors made from grain. Báijiǔ literally means "white (clear) alcohol" or liquor. Báijiǔ is a clear liquid usually...
- Jeppson's Malört, a liquor, is a brand of bäsk produced by the Carl Jeppson Company of Chicago. Jeppson's Malört is named after Carl Jeppson, the Swedish...
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