Definition of Abrus precatorius. Meaning of Abrus precatorius. Synonyms of Abrus precatorius

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Abrus precatorius. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Abrus precatorius and, of course, Abrus precatorius synonyms and on the right images related to the word Abrus precatorius.

Definition of Abrus precatorius

Abrus precatorius
Licorice Lic"o*rice (l[i^]k"[-o]*r[i^]s), n. [OE. licoris, through old French, fr. L. liquiritia, corrupted fr. glycyrrhiza, Gr. glyky`rriza; glyky`s sweet + "ri`za root. Cf. Glycerin, Glycyrrhiza, Wort.] [Written also liquorice.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Glycyrrhiza (G. glabra), the root of which abounds with a sweet juice, and is much used in demulcent compositions. 2. The inspissated juice of licorice root, used as a confection and for medicinal purposes. Licorice fern (Bot.), a name of several kinds of polypody which have rootstocks of a sweetish flavor. Licorice sugar. (Chem.) See Glycyrrhizin. Licorice weed (Bot.), the tropical plant Scapania dulcis. Mountain licorice (Bot.), a kind of clover (Trifolium alpinum), found in the Alps. It has large purplish flowers and a sweetish perennial rootstock. Wild licorice. (Bot.) (a) The North American perennial herb Glycyrrhiza lepidota. (b) Certain broad-leaved cleavers (Galium circ[ae]zans and G. lanceolatum). (c) The leguminous climber Abrus precatorius, whose scarlet and black seeds are called black-eyed Susans. Its roots are used as a substitute for those of true licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra).
Abrus precatorius
Vetch Vetch, n. [Also fitch; OE. ficche, feche, for veche, OF. veche, vecce, vesche, vesce, F. vesce, fr. L. vicia.] (Bot.) Any leguminous plant of the genus Vicia, some species of which are valuable for fodder. The common species is V. sativa. Note: The name is also applied to many other leguminous plants of different genera; as the chichling vetch, of the genus Lathyrus; the horse vetch, of the genus Hippocrepis; the kidney vetch (Anthyllis vulneraria); the milk vetch, of the genus Astragalus; the licorice vetch, or wild licorice (Abrus precatorius).
Abrus precatorius
Jequirity Je*quir"i*ty, n., or Jequirity bean Je*quir"i*ty bean` [Prob. fr. a native name.] (Bot.) The seed of the wild licorice (Abrus precatorius) used by the people of India for beads in rosaries and necklaces, as a standard weight, etc.; -- called also jumble bead.

Meaning of Abrus precatorius from wikipedia

- Abrus precatorius, commonly known as jequirity bean or rosary pea, is a herbaceous flowering plant in the bean family Fabaceae. It is a slender, perennial...
- toxalbumin found in the seeds of the rosary pea (or jequirity pea), Abrus precatorius. It has a median toxic dose of 0.7 micrograms per kilogram of body...
- jequirity (A. precatorius). The highly toxic seeds of that species are used to make jewellery. Abrus aureus R.Vig. (Madagascar) Abrus baladensis Thulin [es]...
- Greatness, and Ability'. In Malay, 'Saga' refers to the hard red seed (abrus precatorius) of the Saga tree. The Proton Saga is also a well-known national symbol...
- measurement for m****. Based on the nominal weight of a Gunja seed (Abrus precatorius), it measured approximately 1.8 or 1.75 grains or 0.1215 g as modern...
- regarding the structure of the prayer bead strand or the materials used. Abrus precatorius Afzelia species C****ospondias axillaris Dracontomelon dao Rudraksha...
- (weight of one wheat berry) 4 Dhan = 1 Ratti (Ratti is the seed of the 'Abrus precatorius'. It is a red seed with a black spot at one end. Abul Fazl refers...
- Toxin Source of Toxin (Military Symbol) Abrin Rosary pea (Abrus precatorius) Botulinum toxins (A through G) Clostridium botulinum bacteria or spores,...
- (Fabaceae) Redoul, Coriaria myrtifolia (Coriariaceae) Rosary pea, Abrus precatorius (Fabaceae) Sandbog death camas, Zigadenus glaberrimus (Melanthiaceae)...
- Lanka, Ghana, Kenya, South Africa. Caterpillars are known to feed on Abrus precatorius. "Species Details : Anoba sinuata Fabricius, 1775". Catalogue of Life...
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