Definition of Domestica. Meaning of Domestica. Synonyms of Domestica

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Domestica. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Domestica and, of course, Domestica synonyms and on the right images related to the word Domestica.

Definition of Domestica

No result for Domestica. Showing similar results...

Domestical
Domestical Do*mes"tic*al, a. Domestic. [Obs.] Our private and domestical matter. --Sir. P. Sidney.
Domestical
Domestical Do*mes"tic*al, n. A family; a household. [Obs.]
Domestically
Domestically Do*mes"tic*al*ly, adv. In a domestic manner; privately; with reference to domestic affairs.
Domesticant
Domesticant Do*mes"ti*cant, a. Forming part of the same family. [Obs.] --Sir E. Dering.
Domestication
Domestication Do*mes`ti*ca"tion, n. [Cf. F. domestication.] The act of domesticating, or accustoming to home; the action of taming wild animals.
Domesticator
Domesticator Do*mes"ti*ca`tor, n. One who domesticates.
Musca domestica
--Simonds. House car (Railroad), a freight car with inclosing sides and a roof; a box car. House of correction. See Correction. House cricket (Zo["o]l.), a European cricket (Gryllus domesticus), which frequently lives in houses, between the bricks of chimneys and fireplaces. It is noted for the loud chirping or stridulation of the males. House dog, a dog kept in or about a dwelling house. House finch (Zo["o]l.), the burion. House flag, a flag denoting the commercial house to which a merchant vessel belongs. House fly (Zo["o]l.), a common fly (esp. Musca domestica), which infests houses both in Europe and America. Its larva is a maggot which lives in decaying substances or excrement, about sink drains, etc. House of God, a temple or church. House of ill fame. See Ill fame under Ill, a. House martin (Zo["o]l.), a common European swallow (Hirundo urbica). It has feathered feet, and builds its nests of mud against the walls of buildings. Called also house swallow, and window martin. House mouse (Zo["o]l.), the common mouse (Mus musculus). House physician, the resident medical adviser of a hospital or other public institution. House snake (Zo["o]l.), the milk snake. House sparrow (Zo["o]l.), the common European sparrow (Passer domesticus). It has recently been introduced into America, where it has become very abundant, esp. in cities. Called also thatch sparrow. House spider (Zo["o]l.), any spider which habitually lives in houses. Among the most common species are Theridium tepidariorum and Tegenaria domestica. House surgeon, the resident surgeon of a hospital. House wren (Zo["o]l.), the common wren of the Eastern United States (Troglodytes a["e]don). It is common about houses and in gardens, and is noted for its vivacity, and loud musical notes. See Wren. Religious house, a monastery or convent. The White House, the official residence of the President of the United States; -- hence, colloquially, the office of President.
P domestica
Prune Prune, n. [F. prune, from L. prunum a plum. See Plum.] A plum; esp., a dried plum, used in cookery; as, French or Turkish prunes; California prunes. German prune (Bot.), a large dark purple plum, of oval shape, often one-sided. It is much used for preserving, either dried or in sirup. Prune tree. (Bot.) (a) A tree of the genus Prunus (P. domestica), which produces prunes. (b) The West Indian tree, Prunus occidentalis. South African prune (Bot.), the edible fruit of a sapindaceous tree (Pappea Capensis).
Prunus domestica
Plum Plum, n. [AS. pl[=u]me, fr. L. prunum; akin to Gr. ?, ?. Cf. Prune a dried plum.] 1. (Bot.) The edible drupaceous fruit of the Prunus domestica, and of several other species of Prunus; also, the tree itself, usually called plum tree. The bullace, the damson, and the numerous varieties of plum, of our gardens, although growing into thornless trees, are believed to be varieties of the blackthorn, produced by long cultivation. --G. Bentham.
Prunus domestica
Note: Two or three hundred varieties of plums derived from the Prunus domestica are described; among them the greengage, the Orleans, the purple gage, or Reine Claude Violette, and the German prune, are some of the best known. Note: Among the true plums are; Beach plum, the Prunus maritima, and its crimson or purple globular drupes, Bullace plum. See Bullace. Chickasaw plum, the American Prunus Chicasa, and its round red drupes. Orleans plum, a dark reddish purple plum of medium size, much grown in England for sale in the markets. Wild plum of America, Prunus Americana, with red or yellow fruit, the original of the Iowa plum and several other varieties. Among plants called plum, but of other genera than Prunus, are; Australian plum, Cargillia arborea and C. australis, of the same family with the persimmon. Blood plum, the West African H[ae]matostaphes Barteri. Cocoa plum, the Spanish nectarine. See under Nectarine. Date plum. See under Date. Gingerbread plum, the West African Parinarium macrophyllum. Gopher plum, the Ogeechee lime. Gray plum, Guinea plum. See under Guinea. Indian plum, several species of Flacourtia. 2. A grape dried in the sun; a raisin. 3. A handsome fortune or property; formerly, in cant language, the sum of [pounds]100,000 sterling; also, the person possessing it. Plum bird, Plum budder (Zo["o]l.), the European bullfinch. Plum gouger (Zo["o]l.), a weevil, or curculio (Coccotorus scutellaris), which destroys plums. It makes round holes in the pulp, for the reception of its eggs. The larva bores into the stone and eats the kernel. Plum weevil (Zo["o]l.), an American weevil which is very destructive to plums, nectarines cherries, and many other stone fruits. It lays its eggs in crescent-shaped incisions made with its jaws. The larva lives upon the pulp around the stone. Called also turk, and plum curculio. See Illust. under Curculio.
Pyrus domestica
Service Serv"ice, n., or Service Serv"ice [Properly, the tree which bears serve, OE. serves, pl., service berries, AS. syrfe service tree; akin to L. sorbus.] (Bot.) A name given to several trees and shrubs of the genus Pyrus, as Pyrus domestica and P. torminalis of Europe, the various species of mountain ash or rowan tree, and the American shad bush (see Shad bush, under Shad). They have clusters of small, edible, applelike berries. Service berry (Bot.), the fruit of any kind of service tree. In British America the name is especially applied to that of the several species or varieties of the shad bush (Amelanchier.)
Tegenaria domestica
--Simonds. House car (Railroad), a freight car with inclosing sides and a roof; a box car. House of correction. See Correction. House cricket (Zo["o]l.), a European cricket (Gryllus domesticus), which frequently lives in houses, between the bricks of chimneys and fireplaces. It is noted for the loud chirping or stridulation of the males. House dog, a dog kept in or about a dwelling house. House finch (Zo["o]l.), the burion. House flag, a flag denoting the commercial house to which a merchant vessel belongs. House fly (Zo["o]l.), a common fly (esp. Musca domestica), which infests houses both in Europe and America. Its larva is a maggot which lives in decaying substances or excrement, about sink drains, etc. House of God, a temple or church. House of ill fame. See Ill fame under Ill, a. House martin (Zo["o]l.), a common European swallow (Hirundo urbica). It has feathered feet, and builds its nests of mud against the walls of buildings. Called also house swallow, and window martin. House mouse (Zo["o]l.), the common mouse (Mus musculus). House physician, the resident medical adviser of a hospital or other public institution. House snake (Zo["o]l.), the milk snake. House sparrow (Zo["o]l.), the common European sparrow (Passer domesticus). It has recently been introduced into America, where it has become very abundant, esp. in cities. Called also thatch sparrow. House spider (Zo["o]l.), any spider which habitually lives in houses. Among the most common species are Theridium tepidariorum and Tegenaria domestica. House surgeon, the resident surgeon of a hospital. House wren (Zo["o]l.), the common wren of the Eastern United States (Troglodytes a["e]don). It is common about houses and in gardens, and is noted for its vivacity, and loud musical notes. See Wren. Religious house, a monastery or convent. The White House, the official residence of the President of the United States; -- hence, colloquially, the office of President.
Undomesticate
Undomesticate Un`do*mes"ti*cate, v. t. [1st pref. un- + domesticate.] To make wild or roving.

Meaning of Domestica from wikipedia

- The housefly (Musca domestica) is a fly of the suborder Cyclorrhapha. It is believed to have evolved in the Cenozoic era, possibly in the Middle East...
- An apple is a sweet, edible fruit produced by an apple tree (Malus domestica). Apple trees are cultivated worldwide and are the most widely grown species...
- Domestica, also styled as Cursive's Domestica, is the third studio album by the American indie rock band Cursive, released on June 20, 2000. This album...
- The spider species Tegenaria domestica, commonly known as the barn funnel weaver in North America and the domestic house spider in Europe, is a member...
- Commelinids Order: Zingiberales Family: Zingiberaceae Genus: Cur****a Species: C. longa Binomial name Cur****a longa L. Synonyms Curcurma domestica Valeton...
- Sorbus domestica, with the common name service tree or sorb tree (because of its fruit), is a species of Sorbus native to western, central and southern...
- Iris domestica, commonly known as leopard lily, blackberry lily, and leopard flower, is an ornamental plant in the family Iridaceae. In 2005, based on...
- Prunus domestica (sometimes referred to as Prunus × domestica), the European plum is a species of flowering plant in the family Rosaceae. A deciduous tree...
- Symphonia Domestica, Op. 53, is a tone poem for large orchestra by Richard Strauss. The work is a musical reflection of the secure domestic life so valued...
- Nandina domestica (/nænˈdiːnə/ nan-DEE-nə) commonly known as nandina, heavenly bamboo or sacred bamboo, is a species of flowering plant in the family...
Loading...