Definition of America. Meaning of America. Synonyms of America

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Definition of America

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A Americana
Maguey Mag"uey, n. [Sp. maguey, Mexican maguei and metl.] (Bot.) The century plant, a species of Agave (A. Americana). See Agave.
A Americana
Widgeon Widg"eon, n. [Probably from an old French form of F. vigeon, vingeon, gingeon; of uncertain origin; cf. L. vipio, -onis, a kind of small crane.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus Anas. The common European widgeon (Anas penelope) and the American widgeon (A. Americana) are the most important species. The latter is called also baldhead, baldpate, baldface, baldcrown, smoking duck, wheat, duck, and whitebelly. Bald-faced, or Green-headed, widgeon, the American widgeon. Black widgeon, the European tufted duck. Gray widgeon. (a) The gadwall. (b) The pintail duck. Great headed widgeon, the poachard. Pied widgeon. (a) The poachard. (b) The goosander. Saw-billed widgeon, the merganser. Sea widgeon. See in the Vocabulary. Spear widgeon, the goosander. [Prov. Eng.] Spoonbilled widgeon, the shoveler. White widgeon, the smew. Wood widgeon, the wood duck.
A Americana
Agave A*ga"ve, n. [L. Agave, prop. name, fr. Gr. ?, fem. of ? illustrious, noble.] (bot.) A genus of plants (order Amaryllidace[ae]) of which the chief species is the maguey or century plant (A. Americana), wrongly called Aloe. It is from ten to seventy years, according to climate, in attaining maturity, when it produces a gigantic flower stem, sometimes forty feet in height, and perishes. The fermented juice is the pulque of the Mexicans; distilled, it yields mescal. A strong thread and a tough paper are made from the leaves, and the wood has many uses.
A Americanus
Lant Lant, n. [Cf. Lance.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small, slender, marine fishes of the genus Ammedytes. The common European species (A. tobianus) and the American species (A. Americanus) live on sandy shores, buried in the sand, and are caught in large quantities for bait. Called also launce, and sand eel.
A Americanus
Moose Moose, n. [A native name; Knisteneaux mouswah; Algonquin monse. Mackenzie.] (Zo["o]l.) A large cervine mammal (Alces machlis, or A. Americanus), native of the Northern United States and Canada. The adult male is about as large as a horse, and has very large, palmate antlers. It closely resembles the European elk, and by many zo["o]logists is considered the same species. See Elk. Moose bird (Zo["o]l.), the Canada jayor whisky jack. See Whisky jack. Moose deer. Same as Moose. Moose yard (Zo["o]l.), a locality where moose, in winter, herd together in a forest to feed and for mutual protection.
Agave Americana
Amole A*mo"le, n. [Mex.] (Bot.) Any detergent plant, or the part of it used as a detergent, as the roots of Agave Americana, Chlorogalum pomeridianum, etc. [Sp. Amer. & Mex.]
Agave Americana
Sisal grass Si*sal" grass`, Sisal hemp Si*sal" hemp`, The prepared fiber of the Agave Americana, or American aloe, used for cordage; -- so called from Sisal, a port in Yucatan. See Sisal hemp, under Hemp.
Agave Americana
Pita Pi"ta, n. [Sp.] (Bot.) (a) A fiber obtained from the Agave Americana and other related species, -- used for making cordage and paper. Called also pita fiber, and pita thread. (b) The plant which yields the fiber.
Agave Americana
Century Cen"tu*ry, n.; pl. Centuries. [L. centuria (in senses 1 & 3), fr. centum a hundred: cf. F. centurie. See Cent.] 1. A hundred; as, a century of sonnets; an aggregate of a hundred things. [Archaic.] And on it said a century of prayers. --Shak. 2. A period of a hundred years; as, this event took place over two centuries ago. Note: Century, in the reckoning of time, although often used in a general way of any series of hundred consecutive years (as, a century of temperance work), usually signifies a division of the Christian era, consisting of a period of one hundred years ending with the hundredth year from which it is named; as, the first century (a. d. 1-100 inclusive); the seventh century (a.d. 601-700); the eighteenth century (a.d. 1701-1800). With words or phrases connecting it with some other system of chronology it is used of similar division of those eras; as, the first century of Rome (A.U.C. 1-100). 3. (Rom. Antiq.) (a) A division of the Roman people formed according to their property, for the purpose of voting for civil officers. (b) One of sixty companies into which a legion of the army was divided. It was Commanded by a centurion. Century plant (Bot.), the Agave Americana, formerly supposed to flower but once in a century; -- hence the name. See Agave. The Magdeburg Centuries, an ecclesiastical history of the first thirteen centuries, arranged in thirteen volumes, compiled in the 16th century by Protestant scholars at Magdeburg.
American
Nutmeg Nut"meg, n. [OE. notemuge; note nut + OF. muge musk, of the same origin as E. musk; cf. OF. noix muguette nutmeg, F. noix muscade. See Nut, and Musk.] (Bot.) The kernel of the fruit of the nutmeg tree (Myristica fragrans), a native of the Molucca Islands, but cultivated elsewhere in the tropics. Note: This fruit is a nearly spherical drupe, of the size of a pear, of a yellowish color without and almost white within. This opens into two nearly equal longitudinal valves, inclosing the nut surrounded by its aril, which is mace The nutmeg is an aromatic, very grateful to the taste and smell, and much used in cookery. Other species of Myristica yield nutmegs of inferior quality. American, Calabash, or Jamaica, nutmeg, the fruit of a tropical shrub (Monodora Myristica). It is about the size of an orange, and contains many aromatic seeds imbedded in pulp. Brazilian nutmeg, the fruit of a lauraceous tree, Cryptocarya moschata. California nutmeg, tree of the Yew family (Torreya Californica), growing in the Western United States, and having a seed which resembles a nutmeg in appearance, but is strongly impregnated with turpentine. Clove nutmeg, the Ravensara aromatica, a laura ceous tree of Madagascar. The foliage is used as a spice, but the seed is acrid and caustic. Jamaica nutmeg. See American nutmeg (above). Nutmeg bird (Zo["o]l.), an Indian finch (Munia punctularia). Nutmeg butter, a solid oil extracted from the nutmeg by expression. Nutmeg flower (Bot.), a ranunculaceous herb (Nigella sativa) with small black aromatic seeds, which are used medicinally and for excluding moths from furs and clothing. Nutmeg liver (Med.), a name applied to the liver, when, as the result of heart or lung disease, it undergoes congestion and pigmentation about the central veins of its lobules, giving it an appearance resembling that of a nutmeg. Nutmeg melon (Bot.), a small variety of muskmelon of a rich flavor. Nutmeg pigeon (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of pigeons of the genus Myristicivora, native of the East Indies and Australia. The color is usually white, or cream-white, with black on the wings and tail. Nutmeg wood (Bot.), the wood of the Palmyra palm. Peruvian nutmeg, the aromatic seed of a South American tree (Laurelia sempervirens). Plume nutmeg (Bot.), a spicy tree of Australia (Atherosperma moschata).
American
American A*mer"i*can, a. [Named from Americus Vespucius.] 1. Of or pertaining to America; as, the American continent: American Indians. 2. Of or pertaining to the United States. ``A young officer of the American navy.' --Lyell. American ivy. See Virginia creeper. American Party (U. S. Politics), a party, about 1854, which opposed the influence of foreign-born citizens, and those supposed to owe allegiance to a foreign power. Native american Party (U. S. Politics), a party of principles similar to those of the American party. It arose about 1843, but soon died out.
American
American A*mer"i*can, n. A native of America; -- originally applied to the aboriginal inhabitants, but now applied to the descendants of Europeans born in America, and especially to the citizens of the United States. The name American must always exalt the pride of patriotism. --Washington.
American Braille
Point Point, n. 1. (Med.) A pointed piece of quill or bone covered at one end with vaccine matter; -- called also vaccine point. 2. One of the raised dots used in certain systems of printing and writing for the blind. The first practical system was that devised by Louis Braille in 1829, and still used in Europe (see Braille). Two modifications of this are current in the United States: New York point founded on three bases of equidistant points arranged in two lines (viz., : :: :::), and a later improvement, American Braille, embodying the Braille base (:::) and the New-York-point principle of using the characters of few points for the commonest letters. 3. In technical senses: (a) In various games, a position of a certain player, or, by extension, the player himself; as: (1) (Lacrosse & Ice Hockey) The position of the player of each side who stands a short distance in front of the goal keeper; also, the player himself. (2) (Baseball) (pl.) The position of the pitcher and catcher. (b) (Hunting) A spot to which a straight run is made; hence, a straight run from point to point; a cross-country run. [Colloq. Oxf. E. D.] (c) (Falconry) The perpendicular rising of a hawk over the place where its prey has gone into cover. (d) Act of pointing, as of the foot downward in certain dance positions.
American calumba
Calumba Ca*lum"ba, n. [from kalumb, its native name in Mozambique.] (Med.) The root of a plant (Jateorrhiza Calumba, and probably Cocculus palmatus), indigenous in Mozambique. It has an unpleasantly bitter taste, and is used as a tonic and antiseptic. [Written also colombo, columbo, and calombo.] American calumba, the Frasera Carolinensis, also called American gentian. Its root has been used in medicine as bitter tonic in place of calumba.
American gentian
Calumba Ca*lum"ba, n. [from kalumb, its native name in Mozambique.] (Med.) The root of a plant (Jateorrhiza Calumba, and probably Cocculus palmatus), indigenous in Mozambique. It has an unpleasantly bitter taste, and is used as a tonic and antiseptic. [Written also colombo, columbo, and calombo.] American calumba, the Frasera Carolinensis, also called American gentian. Its root has been used in medicine as bitter tonic in place of calumba.
American ivy
Virginia Vir*gin"i*a, n. One of the States of the United States of America. -- a. Of or pertaining to the State of Virginia. Virginia cowslip (Bot.), the American lungwort (Mertensia Virginica). Virginia creeper (Bot.), a common ornamental North American woody vine (Ampelopsis quinquefolia), climbing extensively by means of tendrils; -- called also woodbine, and American ivy. [U. S.] Virginia fence. See Worm fence, under Fence. Virginia nightingale (Zo["o]l.), the cardinal bird. See under Cardinal. Virginia quail (Zo["o]l.), the bobwhite. Virginia reel, an old English contradance; -- so called in the United States. --Bartlett. Virginia stock. (Bot.) See Mahon stock.
American ivy
American A*mer"i*can, a. [Named from Americus Vespucius.] 1. Of or pertaining to America; as, the American continent: American Indians. 2. Of or pertaining to the United States. ``A young officer of the American navy.' --Lyell. American ivy. See Virginia creeper. American Party (U. S. Politics), a party, about 1854, which opposed the influence of foreign-born citizens, and those supposed to owe allegiance to a foreign power. Native american Party (U. S. Politics), a party of principles similar to those of the American party. It arose about 1843, but soon died out.
American lion
Puma Pu"ma (p[=u]"m[.a]), n. [Peruv. puma.] (Zo["o]l.) A large American carnivore (Felis concolor), found from Canada to Patagonia, especially among the mountains. Its color is tawny, or brownish yellow, without spots or stripes. Called also catamount, cougar, American lion, mountain lion, and panther or painter.
American lion
Cougar Cou"gar (k??"g?r), n. [F. couguar, from the native name in the South American dialects, cuguacuara, cuguacuarana.] (Zo["o]l.) An American feline quadruped (Felis concolor), resembling the African panther in size and habits. Its color is tawny, without spots; hence writers often called it the American lion. Called also puma, panther, mountain lion, and catamount. See Puma.
American Party
American A*mer"i*can, a. [Named from Americus Vespucius.] 1. Of or pertaining to America; as, the American continent: American Indians. 2. Of or pertaining to the United States. ``A young officer of the American navy.' --Lyell. American ivy. See Virginia creeper. American Party (U. S. Politics), a party, about 1854, which opposed the influence of foreign-born citizens, and those supposed to owe allegiance to a foreign power. Native american Party (U. S. Politics), a party of principles similar to those of the American party. It arose about 1843, but soon died out.
American pika
Chief hare Chief" hare` (Zo["o]l.) A small rodent (Lagamys princeps) inhabiting the summits of the Rocky Mountains; -- also called crying hare, calling hare, cony, American pika, and little chief hare. Note: It is not a true hare or rabbit, but belongs to the curious family Lagomyid[ae].
American pitcher plants
Pitcher Pitch"er, n. [OE. picher, OF. pichier, OHG. pehhar, pehh[=a]ri; prob. of the same origin as E. beaker. Cf. Beaker.] 1. A wide-mouthed, deep vessel for holding liquids, with a spout or protruding lip and a handle; a water jug or jar with a large ear or handle. 2. (Bot.) A tubular or cuplike appendage or expansion of the leaves of certain plants. American pitcher plants, the species of Sarracenia. See Sarracenia. Australian pitcher plant, the Cephalotus follicularis, a low saxifragaceous herb having two kinds of radical leaves, some oblanceolate and entire, others transformed into little ovoid pitchers, longitudinally triple-winged and ciliated, the mouth covered with a lid shaped like a cockleshell. California pitcher plant, the Darlingtonia California. See Darlingtonia. Pitcher plant, any plant with the whole or a part of the leaves transformed into pitchers or cuplike organs, especially the species of Nepenthes. See Nepenthes.
American plan
American plan A*mer"i*can plan In hotels, aplan upon which guests pay for both room and board by the day, week, or other convenient period; -- contrasted with European plan.
American poachard
Redhead Red"head` (-h?d`), n. 1. A person having red hair. 2. (Zo["o]l.) (a) An American duck (Aythya Americana) highly esteemed as a game bird. It is closely allied to the canvasback, but is smaller and its head brighter red. Called also red-headed duck. American poachard, grayback, and fall duck. See Illust. under Poachard. (b) The red-headed woodpecker. See Woodpecker. 3. (Bot.) A kind of milkweed (Asclepias Curassavica) with red flowers. It is used in medicine.
American Protective Association
American Protective Association A*mer"i*can Pro*tect"ive As*so`ci*a"tion A secret organization in the United States, formed in Iowa in 1887, ostensibly for the protection of American institutions by keeping Roman Catholics out of public office. Abbrev. commonly to A. P .A.
American rail
Sora So"ra, n. (Zo["o]l.) A North American rail (Porzana Carolina) common in the Eastern United States. Its back is golden brown, varied with black and white, the front of the head and throat black, the breast and sides of the head and neck slate-colored. Called also American rail, Carolina rail, Carolina crake, common rail, sora rail, soree, meadow chicken, and orto. King sora, the Florida gallinule.
American silkworm
Polyphemus Pol`y*phe"mus, n. [L. Polyphemus the one-eyed Cyclops who was blinded by Ulysses.] (Zo["o]l.) A very large American moth (Telea polyphemus) belonging to the Silkworm family (Bombycid[ae]). Its larva, which is very large, bright green, with silvery tubercles, and with oblique white stripes on the sides, feeds on the oak, chestnut, willow, cherry, apple, and other trees. It produces a large amount of strong silk. Called also American silkworm.
American silver fir
Silver Sil"ver, a. 1. Of or pertaining to silver; made of silver; as, silver leaf; a silver cup. 2. Resembling silver. Specifically: (a) Bright; resplendent; white. ``Silver hair.' --Shak. Others, on silver lakes and rivers, bathed Their downy breast. --Milton. (b) Precious; costly. (c) Giving a clear, ringing sound soft and clear. ``Silver voices.' --Spenser. (d) Sweet; gentle; peaceful. ``Silver slumber.' --Spenser. American silver fir (Bot.), the balsam fir. See under Balsam. Silver age (Roman Lit.), the latter part (a. d. 14-180) of the classical period of Latinity, -- the time of writers of inferior purity of language, as compared with those of the previous golden age, so-called. Silver-bell tree (Bot.), an American shrub or small tree (Halesia tetraptera) with white bell-shaped flowers in clusters or racemes; the snowdrop tree. Silver bush (Bot.), a shrubby leguminous plant (Anthyllis Barba-Jovis) of Southern Europe, having silvery foliage. Silver chub (Zo["o]l.), the fallfish. Silver eel. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The cutlass fish. (b) A pale variety of the common eel. Silver fir (Bot.), a coniferous tree (Abies pectinata) found in mountainous districts in the middle and south of Europe, where it often grows to the height of 100 or 150 feet. It yields Burgundy pitch and Strasburg turpentine. Silver foil, foil made of silver. Silver fox (Zo["o]l.), a variety of the common fox (Vulpes vulpes, variety argenteus) found in the northern parts of Asia, Europe, and America. Its fur is nearly black, with silvery tips, and is highly valued. Called also black fox, and silver-gray fox. Silver gar. (Zo["o]l.) See Billfish (a) . Silver grain (Bot.), the lines or narrow plates of cellular tissue which pass from the pith to the bark of an exogenous stem; the medullary rays. In the wood of the oak they are much larger than in that of the beech, maple, pine, cherry, etc. Silver grebe (Zo["o]l.), the red-throated diver. See Illust. under Diver. Silver hake (Zo["o]l.), the American whiting. Silver leaf, leaves or sheets made of silver beaten very thin. Silver lunge (Zo["o]l.), the namaycush. Silver moonfish.(Zo["o]l.) See Moonfish (b) . Silver moth (Zo["o]l.), a lepisma. Silver owl (Zo["o]l.), the barn owl. Silver perch (Zo["o]l.), the mademoiselle, 2. Silver pheasant (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of beautiful crested and long-tailed Asiatic pheasants, of the genus Euplocamus. They have the tail and more or less of the upper parts silvery white. The most common species (E. nychtemerus) is native of China. Silver plate, domestic utensils made of silver.
American siskin
Pinefinch Pine"finch`, n. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American bird (Spinus, or Chrysomitris, spinus); -- called also pine siskin, and American siskin. (b) The pine grosbeak.
American skylark
Pipit Pip"it, n. [So named from its call note.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of small singing birds belonging to Anthus and allied genera, of the family Motacillid[ae]. They strongly resemble the true larks in habits, colors, and the great length of the hind claw. They are, therefore, often called titlarks, and pipit larks. Note: The meadow pipit (Anthus pratensis); the tree pipit, or tree lark (A. trivialis); and the rock pipit, or sea lark (A. obscurus) are well-known European species. The common American pipit, or brown lark, is Anthus Pensilvanicus. The Western species (A. Spraguei) is called the American skylark, on account of its musical powers.

Meaning of America from wikipedia

- 40°N 100°W / 40; -100 The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S.) or America, is a federal republic composed of 50 states...
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- Captain America: Civil War is a 2016 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Captain America, produced by Marvel Studios and distributed...
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- America America (British title The Anatolian Smile—a reference to an ongoing acknowledgment of the character Stavros' captivating smile) is a 1963 American...
- Captain America: The First Avenger is a 2011 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Captain America, produced by Marvel Studios...
- Captain America: The Winter Soldier is a 2014 American superhero film based on the Marvel Comics character Captain America, produced by Marvel Studios...
- This Is America may refer to: This Is America (Kim Weston album) (1968) "This Is America" (Justin Tranchita song) (2015) "This Is America" (Childish Gambino...
- Radio Free America may refer to: The religious pirate radio station operated by Carl McIntire in 1973; see also Pirate_radio_in_North_America...
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