Definition of Pigeon. Meaning of Pigeon. Synonyms of Pigeon

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Definition of Pigeon

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Cape pigeon
Cape Cape (k[=a]p), n. [F. cap, fr. It. capo head, cape, fr. L. caput heat, end, point. See Chief.] A piece or point of land, extending beyond the adjacent coast into the sea or a lake; a promontory; a headland. Cape buffalo (Zo["o]l.) a large and powerful buffalo of South Africa (Bubalus Caffer). It is said to be the most dangerous wild beast of Africa. See Buffalo, 2. Cape jasmine, Cape jassamine. See Jasmine. Cape pigeon (Zo["o]l.), a petrel (Daptium Capense) common off the Cape of Good Hope. It is about the size of a pigeon. Cape wine, wine made in South Africa [Eng.] The Cape, the Cape of Good Hope, in the general sense of southern extremity of Africa. Also used of Cape Horn, and, in New England, of Cape Cod.
Carrier pigeon
Carrier Car"ri*er, n. [From Carry.] 1. One who, or that which, carries or conveys; a messenger. The air which is but . . . a carrier of the sounds. --Bacon. 2. One who is employed, or makes it his business, to carry goods for others for hire; a porter; a teamster. The roads are crowded with carriers, laden with rich manufactures. --Swift. 3. (Mach.) That which drives or carries; as: (a) A piece which communicates to an object in a lathe the motion of the face plate; a lathe dog. (b) A spool holder or bobbin holder in a braiding machine. (c) A movable piece in magazine guns which transfers the cartridge to a position from which it can be thrust into the barrel. Carrier pigeon (Zo["o]l.), a variety of the domestic pigeon used to convey letters from a distant point to to its home. Carrier shell (Zo["o]l.), a univalve shell of the genus Phorus; -- so called because it fastens bits of stones and broken shells to its own shell, to such an extent as almost to conceal it. Common carrier (Law.) See under Common, a.
carrier pigeons
Dove Dove, n. [OE. dove, duve, douve, AS. d?fe; akin to OS. d?ba, D. duif, OHG. t?ba, G. taube, Icel. d?fa, Sw. dufva, Dan. due, Goth. d?b?; perh. from the root of E. dive.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A pigeon of the genus Columba and various related genera. The species are numerous. Note: The domestic dove, including the varieties called fantails, tumblers, carrier pigeons, etc., was derived from the rock pigeon (Columba livia) of Europe and Asia; the turtledove of Europe, celebrated for its sweet, plaintive note, is C. turtur or Turtur vulgaris; the ringdove, the largest of European species, is C. palumbus; the Carolina dove, or Mourning dove, is Zenaidura macroura; the sea dove is the little auk (Mergulus alle or Alle alle). See Turtledove, Ground dove, and Rock pigeon. The dove is a symbol of innocence, gentleness, and affection; also, in art and in the Scriptures, the typical symbol of the Holy Ghost.
Gyropigeon
Gyropigeon Gy"ro*pi"geon, n. [L. gyrare to revolve + E. pigeon.] A flying object simulating a pigeon in flight, when projected from a spring trap. It is used as a flying target in shooting matches. --Knight.
Homing pigeon
Homing Hom"ing, p.a. Home-returning. Homing pigeon, a pigeon trained to return home from a distance. Homing pigeons are used for sending back messages or for flying races. By carrying the birds away and releasing them at gradually increasing distances from home, they may be trained to return with more or less certainty and promptness from distances up to four or five hundred miles. If the distance is increased much beyond this, the birds are unable to cover it without stopping for a prolonged rest, and their return becomes doubtful. Homing pigeons are not bred for fancy points or special colors, but for strength, speed, endurance, and intelligence or homing instinct.
Nutmeg pigeon
Nutmeg Nut"meg, n. [OE. notemuge; note nut + OF. muge musk, of the same origin as E. musk; cf. OF. noix muguette nutmeg, F. noix muscade. See Nut, and Musk.] (Bot.) The kernel of the fruit of the nutmeg tree (Myristica fragrans), a native of the Molucca Islands, but cultivated elsewhere in the tropics. Note: This fruit is a nearly spherical drupe, of the size of a pear, of a yellowish color without and almost white within. This opens into two nearly equal longitudinal valves, inclosing the nut surrounded by its aril, which is mace The nutmeg is an aromatic, very grateful to the taste and smell, and much used in cookery. Other species of Myristica yield nutmegs of inferior quality. American, Calabash, or Jamaica, nutmeg, the fruit of a tropical shrub (Monodora Myristica). It is about the size of an orange, and contains many aromatic seeds imbedded in pulp. Brazilian nutmeg, the fruit of a lauraceous tree, Cryptocarya moschata. California nutmeg, tree of the Yew family (Torreya Californica), growing in the Western United States, and having a seed which resembles a nutmeg in appearance, but is strongly impregnated with turpentine. Clove nutmeg, the Ravensara aromatica, a laura ceous tree of Madagascar. The foliage is used as a spice, but the seed is acrid and caustic. Jamaica nutmeg. See American nutmeg (above). Nutmeg bird (Zo["o]l.), an Indian finch (Munia punctularia). Nutmeg butter, a solid oil extracted from the nutmeg by expression. Nutmeg flower (Bot.), a ranunculaceous herb (Nigella sativa) with small black aromatic seeds, which are used medicinally and for excluding moths from furs and clothing. Nutmeg liver (Med.), a name applied to the liver, when, as the result of heart or lung disease, it undergoes congestion and pigmentation about the central veins of its lobules, giving it an appearance resembling that of a nutmeg. Nutmeg melon (Bot.), a small variety of muskmelon of a rich flavor. Nutmeg pigeon (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of pigeons of the genus Myristicivora, native of the East Indies and Australia. The color is usually white, or cream-white, with black on the wings and tail. Nutmeg wood (Bot.), the wood of the Palmyra palm. Peruvian nutmeg, the aromatic seed of a South American tree (Laurelia sempervirens). Plume nutmeg (Bot.), a spicy tree of Australia (Atherosperma moschata).
Passenger pigeon
Passenger Pas"sen*ger, n. [OE. & F. passager. See Passage, and cf. Messenger.] 1. A passer or passer-by; a wayfarer. --Shak. 2. A traveler by some established conveyance, as a coach, steamboat, railroad train, etc. Passenger falcon (Zo["o]l.), a migratory hawk. --Ainsworth. Passenger pigeon (Zo["o]l.), the common wild pigeon of North America (Ectopistes migratorius), so called on account of its extensive migrations.
pigeon berry
Poke Poke, n. (Bot.) A large North American herb of the genus Phytolacca (P. decandra), bearing dark purple juicy berries; -- called also garget, pigeon berry, pocan, and pokeweed. The root and berries have emetic and purgative properties, and are used in medicine. The young shoots are sometimes eaten as a substitute for asparagus, and the berries are said to be used in Europe to color wine.
Pigeon grass
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
Pigeon hawk
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
Pigeon hole
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
Pigeon house
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
Pigeon pea
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
pigeon pea
Angola pea An*go"la pea` (Bot.) A tropical plant (Cajanus indicus) and its edible seed, a kind of pulse; -- so called from Angola in Western Africa. Called also pigeon pea and Congo pea.
Pigeon plum
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
Pigeon tremex
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
Pigeon wood
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
pigeon wood
Porkwood Pork"wood`, n. (Bot.) The coarse-grained brownish yellow wood of a small tree (Pisonia obtusata) of Florida and the West Indies. Also called pigeon wood, beefwood, and corkwood.
Pigeon woodpecker
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
pigeon woodpecker
Flicker Flick"er, n. 1. The act of wavering or of fluttering; flucuation; sudden and brief increase of brightness; as, the last flicker of the dying flame. 2. (Zo["o]l.) The golden-winged woodpecker (Colaptes aurutus); -- so called from its spring note. Called also yellow-hammer, high-holder, pigeon woodpecker, and yucca. The cackle of the flicker among the oaks. --Thoureau.
Pigeon-breasted
Pigeon-breasted Pi"geon-breast`ed, a. Having a breast like a pigeon, -- the sternum being so prominent as to constitute a deformity; chicken-breasted.
Pigeon-hearted
Pigeon-hearted Pi"geon-heart`ed, a. Timid; easily frightened; chicken-hearted. --Beau. & Fl.
Pigeonhole
Pigeonhole Pi"geon*hole`, n. A small compartment in a desk or case for the keeping of letters, documents, etc.; -- so called from the resemblance of a row of them to the compartments in a dovecote. --Burke.
Pigeonhole
Pigeonhole Pi"geon*hole`, v. t. To place in the pigeonhole of a case or cabinet; hence, to put away; to lay aside indefinitely; as, to pigeonhole a letter or a report.
Pigeon-livered
Pigeon-livered Pi"geon-liv`ered, a. Pigeon-hearted.
Pigeonry
Pigeonry Pi"geon*ry, n. A place for pigeons; a dovecote.
Pigeontoed
Pigeontoed Pi"geon*toed`, a. Having the toes turned in.
Prairie pigeon
Pigeon grass (Bot.), a kind of foxtail grass (Setaria glauca), of some value as fodder. The seeds are eagerly eaten by pigeons and other birds. Pigeon hawk. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small American falcon (Falco columbarius). The adult male is dark slate-blue above, streaked with black on the back; beneath, whitish or buff, streaked with brown. The tail is banded. (b) The American sharp-shinned hawk (Accipiter velox, or fuscus). Pigeon hole. (a) A hole for pigeons to enter a pigeon house. (b) See Pigeonhole. (c) pl. An old English game, in which balls were rolled through little arches. --Halliwell. Pigeon house, a dovecote. Pigeon pea (Bot.), the seed of Cajanus Indicus; a kind of pulse used for food in the East and West Indies; also, the plant itself. Pigeon plum (Bot.), the edible drupes of two West African species of Chrysobalanus (C. ellipticus and C. luteus). Pigeon tremex. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tremex. Pigeon wood (Bot.), a name in the West Indies for the wood of several very different kinds of trees, species of Dipholis, Diospyros, and Coccoloba. Pigeon woodpecker (Zo["o]l.), the flicker. Prairie pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The upland plover. (b) The golden plover. [Local, U.S.]
Prairie pigeon
Prairie Prai"rie, n. [F., an extensive meadow, OF. praerie, LL. prataria, fr. L. pratum a meadow.] 1. An extensive tract of level or rolling land, destitute of trees, covered with coarse grass, and usually characterized by a deep, fertile soil. They abound throughout the Mississippi valley, between the Alleghanies and the Rocky mountains. From the forests and the prairies, From the great lakes of the northland. --Longfellow. 2. A meadow or tract of grass; especially, a so called natural meadow. Prairie chicken (Zo["o]l.), any American grouse of the genus Tympanuchus, especially T. Americanus (formerly T. cupido), which inhabits the prairies of the central United States. Applied also to the sharp-tailed grouse. Prairie clover (Bot.), any plant of the leguminous genus Petalostemon, having small rosy or white flowers in dense terminal heads or spikes. Several species occur in the prairies of the United States. Prairie dock (Bot.), a coarse composite plant (Silphium terebinthaceum) with large rough leaves and yellow flowers, found in the Western prairies. Prairie dog (Zo["o]l.), a small American rodent (Cynomys Ludovicianus) allied to the marmots. It inhabits the plains west of the Mississippi. The prairie dogs burrow in the ground in large warrens, and have a sharp bark like that of a dog. Called also prairie marmot. Prairie grouse. Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie hare (Zo["o]l.), a large long-eared Western hare (Lepus campestris). See Jack rabbit, under 2d Jack. Prairie hawk, Prairie falcon (Zo["o]l.), a falcon of Western North America (Falco Mexicanus). The upper parts are brown. The tail has transverse bands of white; the under parts, longitudinal streaks and spots of brown. Prairie hen. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie chicken, above. Prairie itch (Med.), an affection of the skin attended with intense itching, which is observed in the Northern and Western United States; -- also called swamp itch, winter itch. Prairie marmot. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Prairie dog, above. Prairie mole (Zo["o]l.), a large American mole (Scalops argentatus), native of the Western prairies. Prairie pigeon, plover, or snipe (Zo["o]l.), the upland plover. See Plover, n., 2. Prairie rattlesnake (Zo["o]l.), the massasauga. Prairie snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless American snake (Masticophis flavigularis). It is pale yellow, tinged with brown above. Prairie squirrel (Zo["o]l.), any American ground squirrel of the genus Spermophilus, inhabiting prairies; -- called also gopher. Prairie turnip (Bot.), the edible turnip-shaped farinaceous root of a leguminous plant (Psoralea esculenta) of the Upper Missouri region; also, the plant itself. Called also pomme blanche, and pomme de prairie. Prairie warbler (Zo["o]l.), a bright-colored American warbler (Dendroica discolor). The back is olive yellow, with a group of reddish spots in the middle; the under parts and the parts around the eyes are bright yellow; the sides of the throat and spots along the sides, black; three outer tail feathers partly white. Prairie wolf. (Zo["o]l.) See Coyote.
rock pigeon
Sand grouse (Zo["o]l.), any one of many species of Old World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both grouse and pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga. They mostly belong to the genus Pterocles, as the common Indian species (P. exustus). The large sand grouse (P. arenarius), the painted sand grouse (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P. alchata) are also found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. Sand hill, a hill of sand; a dune. Sand-hill crane (Zo["o]l.), the American brown crane (Grus Mexicana). Sand hopper (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea; an orchestian. Sand hornet (Zo["o]l.), a sand wasp. Sand lark. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of India. (b) A small sandpiper, or plover, as the ringneck, the sanderling, and the common European sandpiper. (c) The Australian red-capped dotterel ([AE]gialophilus ruficapillus); -- called also red-necked plover. Sand launce (Zo["o]l.), a lant, or launce. Sand lizard (Zo["o]l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). Sand martin (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. Sand mole (Zo["o]l.), the coast rat. Sand monitor (Zo["o]l.), a large Egyptian lizard (Monitor arenarius) which inhabits dry localities. Sand mouse (Zo["o]l.), the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under Myrtle. Sand partridge (Zo["o]l.), either of two small Asiatic partridges of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The other species (A. Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also seesee partridge, and teehoo. Sand picture, a picture made by putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. Sand pike. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. Sand pillar, a sand storm which takes the form of a whirling pillar in its progress in desert tracts like those of the Sahara and Mongolia. Sand pipe (Geol.), a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in depth, occurring especially in calcareous rocks, and often filled with gravel, sand, etc.; -- called also sand gall. Sand pride (Zo["o]l.), a small British lamprey now considered to be the young of larger species; -- called also sand prey. Sand pump, in artesian well boring, a long, slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for raising sand from the well. Sand rat (Zo["o]l.), the pocket gopher. Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. Sand runner (Zo["o]l.), the turnstone. Sand saucer (Zo["o]l.), the mass of egg capsules, or o["o]thec[ae], of any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera. It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand; -- called also sand collar. Sand screw (Zo["o]l.), an amphipod crustacean (Lepidactylis arenarius), which burrows in the sandy seabeaches of Europe and America. Sand shark (Zo["o]l.), an American shark (Odontaspis littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of the Eastern United States; -- called also gray shark, and dogfish shark. See Illust. under Remora. Sand skink (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as, the ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. Sand skipper (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea, or orchestian. Sand smelt (Zo["o]l.), a silverside. Sand snake. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native of Southern Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. jaculus of India and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African snake of the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. Sand snipe (Zo["o]l.), the sandpiper. Sand star (Zo["o]l.), an ophiurioid starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. Sand storm, a cloud of sand driven violently by the wind. Sand sucker, the sandnecker. Sand swallow (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. See under Bank. Sand tube, a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of vitrified sand, produced by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any tube made of cemented sand. (c) (Zo["o]l.) In starfishes, a tube having calcareous particles in its wall, which connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. Sand viper. (Zo["o]l.) See Hognose snake. Sand wasp (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to the families Pompilid[ae] and Spherid[ae], which dig burrows in sand. The female provisions the nest with insects or spiders which she paralyzes by stinging, and which serve as food for her young.

Meaning of Pigeon from wikipedia

- Columbidae (/kəˈlʌmbɪdiː/) is a bird family consisting of pigeons and doves. It is the only family in the order Columbiformes. These are stout-bodied...
- The homing pigeon, also called the mail pigeon or messenger pigeon, is a variety of domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica) derived from the wild rock...
- domestic pigeon (Columba livia domestica) is a pigeon subspecies that was derived from the rock dove (also called the rock pigeon). The rock pigeon is the...
- dove, rock pigeon, or common pigeon (/ˈpɪdʒ.ən/ also /ˈpɪdʒ.ɪn/; Columba livia) is a member of the bird family Columbidae (doves and pigeons).: 624  In...
- Is this a Pigeon? is an Internet meme and memorable quote of the protagonist character from the 1990s ****anese anime TV series The Brave Fighter of Sun...
- Feral pigeons (Columba livia domestica), also called city doves, city pigeons, or street pigeons, are descended from domestic pigeons (Columba livia domestica)...
- The p****enger pigeon or wild pigeon (Ectopistes migratorius) is an extinct species of pigeon that was endemic to North America. Its common name is derived...
- rock pigeon. Pigeon may also refer to: Pigeon, Indiana, an unincorporated community Pigeon, Michigan, a village Pigeon, Wisconsin, a town Pigeon, West...
- The pigeon pea (Caj**** cajan) is a perennial legume from the family Fabaceae native to the Old World. The pigeon pea is widely cultivated in tropical...
- Pigeon post is the use of homing pigeons to carry messages. Pigeons are effective as messengers due to their natural homing abilities. The pigeons are...