Definition of Apple. Meaning of Apple. Synonyms of Apple

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Definition of Apple

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Alligator apple
Alligator Al"li*ga`tor, n. [Sp. el lagarto the lizard (el lagarto de Indias, the cayman or American crocodile), fr. L. lacertus, lacerta, lizard. See Lizard.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A large carnivorous reptile of the Crocodile family, peculiar to America. It has a shorter and broader snout than the crocodile, and the large teeth of the lower jaw shut into pits in the upper jaw, which has no marginal notches. Besides the common species of the southern United States, there are allied species in South America. 2. (Mech.) Any machine with strong jaws, one of which opens like the movable jaw of an alligator; as, (a) (Metal Working) a form of squeezer for the puddle ball; (b) (Mining) a rock breaker; (c) (Printing) a kind of job press, called also alligator press. Alligator apple (Bot.), the fruit of the Anona palustris, a West Indian tree. It is said to be narcotic in its properties. --Loudon. Alligator fish (Zo["o]l.), a marine fish of northwestern America (Podothecus acipenserinus). Alligator gar (Zo["o]l.), one of the gar pikes (Lepidosteus spatula) found in the southern rivers of the United States. The name is also applied to other species of gar pikes. Alligator pear (Bot.), a corruption of Avocado pear. See Avocado. Alligator snapper, Alligator tortoise, Alligator turtle (Zo["o]l.), a very large and voracious turtle (Macrochelys lacertina) inhabiting the rivers of the southern United States. It sometimes reaches the weight of two hundred pounds. Unlike the common snapping turtle, to which the name is sometimes erroneously applied, it has a scaly head and many small scales beneath the tail. This name is sometimes given to other turtles, as to species of Trionyx. Alligator wood, the timber of a tree of the West Indies (Guarea Swartzii).
Apple borer
Longicornia Lon`gi*cor"ni*a, n. pl. [NL., fr. L. longus long + cornu horn.] (Zo["o]l.) A division of beetles, including a large number of species, in which the antenn[ae] are very long. Most of them, while in the larval state, bore into the wood or beneath the bark of trees, and some species are very destructive to fruit and shade trees. See Apple borer, under Apple, and Locust beetle, under Locust.
Apple of discord
Discord Dis"cord`, n. [OE. discord, descord, OF. discorde, descorde, F. discorde, from L. discordia, fr. discors, -cordis, discordant, disagreeable; dis- + cor, cordis, heart; cf. F. discord, n., and OF. descorder, discorder, F. discorder, to discord, L. discordare, from discors. See Heart, and cf. Discord, v. i.] 1. Want of concord or agreement; absence of unity or harmony in sentiment or action; variance leading to contention and strife; disagreement; -- applied to persons or to things, and to thoughts, feelings, or purposes. A false witness that speaketh lies, and he that soweth discord among brethren. --Prov. vi. 19. Peace to arise out of universal discord fomented in all parts of the empire. --Burke. 2. (Mus.) Union of musical sounds which strikes the ear harshly or disagreeably, owing to the incommensurability of the vibrations which they produce; want of musical concord or harmony; a chord demanding resolution into a concord. For a discord itself is but a harshness of divers sounds m???ing. --Bacon. Apple of discord. See under Apple. Syn: Variance; difference; opposition; contrariety; clashing; dissension; contention; strife; disagreement; dissonance.
Apple pie
Apple pie Ap"ple pie` A pie made of apples (usually sliced or stewed) with spice and sugar. Apple-pie bed, a bed in which, as a joke, the sheets are so doubled (like the cover of an apple turnover) as to prevent any one from getting at his length between them. --Halliwell --Conybeare. Apple-pie order, perfect order or arrangement. [Colloq.] --Halliwell.
Apple-faced
Apple-faced Ap"ple-faced`, a. Having a round, broad face, like an apple. ``Apple-faced children.' --Dickens.
Apple-jack
Apple-jack Ap"ple-jack`, n. Apple brandy. [U.S.]
Apple-john
Apple-john Ap"ple-john`, n.. A kind of apple which by keeping becomes much withered; -- called also Johnapple. --Shak.
Apple-pie bed
Apple pie Ap"ple pie` A pie made of apples (usually sliced or stewed) with spice and sugar. Apple-pie bed, a bed in which, as a joke, the sheets are so doubled (like the cover of an apple turnover) as to prevent any one from getting at his length between them. --Halliwell --Conybeare. Apple-pie order, perfect order or arrangement. [Colloq.] --Halliwell.
Apple-pie order
Apple pie Ap"ple pie` A pie made of apples (usually sliced or stewed) with spice and sugar. Apple-pie bed, a bed in which, as a joke, the sheets are so doubled (like the cover of an apple turnover) as to prevent any one from getting at his length between them. --Halliwell --Conybeare. Apple-pie order, perfect order or arrangement. [Colloq.] --Halliwell.
Apple-squire
Apple-squire Ap"ple-squire`, n. A pimp; a kept gallant. [Obs.] --Beau. & Fl.
Bitter apple
Bitter Bit"ter, a. [AS. biter; akin to Goth. baitrs, Icel. bitr, Dan., Sw., D., & G. bitter, OS. bittar, fr. root of E. bite. See Bite, v. t.] 1. Having a peculiar, acrid, biting taste, like that of wormwood or an infusion of hops; as, a bitter medicine; bitter as aloes. 2. Causing pain or smart; piercing; painful; sharp; severe; as, a bitter cold day. 3. Causing, or fitted to cause, pain or distress to the mind; calamitous; poignant. It is an evil thing and bitter, that thou hast forsaken the Lord thy God. --Jer. ii. 19. 4. Characterized by sharpness, severity, or cruelty; harsh; stern; virulent; as, bitter reproach. Husbands, love your wives, and be not bitter against them. --Col. iii. 19. 5. Mournful; sad; distressing; painful; pitiable. The Egyptians . . . made their lives bitter with hard bondage. --Ex. i. 14. Bitter apple, Bitter cucumber, Bitter gourd. (Bot.) See Colocynth. Bitter cress (Bot.), a plant of the genus Cardamine, esp. C. amara. Bitter earth (Min.), tale earth; calcined magnesia. Bitter principles (Chem.), a class of substances, extracted from vegetable products, having strong bitter taste but with no sharply defined chemical characteristics. Bitter salt, Epsom salts; magnesium sulphate. Bitter vetch (Bot.), a name given to two European leguminous herbs, Vicia Orobus and Ervum Ervilia. To the bitter end, to the last extremity, however calamitous. Syn: Acrid; sharp; harsh; pungent; stinging; cutting; severe; acrimonious.
bitter apple
Colocynth Col"ocynth, n. [L. colocynthis, Gr. ?. Cf. Coloquintida.] (Med.) The light spongy pulp of the fruit of the bitter cucumber (Citrullus, or Cucumis, colocynthis), an Asiatic plant allied to the watermelon; coloquintida. It comes in white balls, is intensely bitter, and a powerful cathartic. Called also bitter apple, bitter cucumber, bitter gourd.
Chess-apple
Chess-apple Chess"-ap`ple, n. The wild service of Europe (Purus torminalis).
Custard apple
Custard Cus"tard (k?s"t?rd), n. [Prob. the same word as OE. crustade, crustate, a pie made with a crust, fr. L. crustatus covered with a crust, p. p. of crustare, fr. crusta crust; cf. OF. croustade pasty, It. crostata, or F. coutarde. See Crust, and cf. Crustated.] A mixture of milk and eggs, sweetened, and baked or boiled. Custard apple (Bot.), a low tree or shrub of tropical America, including several species of Anona (A. squamosa, reticulata, etc.), having a roundish or ovate fruit the size of a small orange, containing a soft, yellowish, edible pulp. Custard coffin, pastry, or crust, which covers or coffins a custard [Obs.] --Shak.
Dapple
Dapple Dap"ple, n. [Cf. Icel. depill a spot, a dot, a dog with spots over the eyes, dapi a pool, and E. dimple.] One of the spots on a dappled animal. He has . . . as many eyes on his body as my gray mare hath dapples. --Sir P. Sidney.
Dapple
Dapple Dap"ple, Dappled Dap"pled, a. Marked with spots of different shades of color; spotted; variegated; as, a dapple horse. Some dapple mists still floated along the peaks. --Sir W. Scott. Note: The word is used in composition to denote that some color is variegated or marked with spots; as, dapple-bay; dapple-gray. His steed was all dapple-gray. --Chaucer. O, swiftly can speed my dapple-gray steed. --Sir W. Scott.
Dapple
Dapple Dap"ple, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dappled; p. pr. & vb. n. Dappling.] To variegate with spots; to spot. The gentle day, . . . Dapples the drowsy east with spots of gray. --Shak. The dappled pink and blushing rose. --Prior.
Dappled
Dapple Dap"ple, Dappled Dap"pled, a. Marked with spots of different shades of color; spotted; variegated; as, a dapple horse. Some dapple mists still floated along the peaks. --Sir W. Scott. Note: The word is used in composition to denote that some color is variegated or marked with spots; as, dapple-bay; dapple-gray. His steed was all dapple-gray. --Chaucer. O, swiftly can speed my dapple-gray steed. --Sir W. Scott.
Dappled
Dapple Dap"ple, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Dappled; p. pr. & vb. n. Dappling.] To variegate with spots; to spot. The gentle day, . . . Dapples the drowsy east with spots of gray. --Shak. The dappled pink and blushing rose. --Prior.
Engrapple
Engrapple En*grap"ple, v. t. & i. To grapple. [Obs.]
golden apple
Bel Bel, n. [Hind., fr. Skr. bilva.] A thorny rutaceous tree ([AE]gle marmelos) of India, and its aromatic, orange-like fruit; -- called also Bengal quince, golden apple, wood apple. The fruit is used medicinally, and the rind yields a perfume and a yellow dye.
Grapple
Grapple Grap"ple, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Grappled; p. pr. & vb. n. Grappling.] [F. grappiller, OF. graypil the grapple of a ship, fr. graper to pluck, prop., to seize, clutch; of German origin. See Grape.] 1. To seize; to lay fast hold of; to attack at close quarters: as, to grapple an antagonist. 2. To fasten, as with a grapple; to fix; to join indissolubly. The gallies were grappled to the Centurion. --Hakluyt. Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel. --Shak.
Grappled
Grapple Grap"ple, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Grappled; p. pr. & vb. n. Grappling.] [F. grappiller, OF. graypil the grapple of a ship, fr. graper to pluck, prop., to seize, clutch; of German origin. See Grape.] 1. To seize; to lay fast hold of; to attack at close quarters: as, to grapple an antagonist. 2. To fasten, as with a grapple; to fix; to join indissolubly. The gallies were grappled to the Centurion. --Hakluyt. Grapple them to thy soul with hoops of steel. --Shak.
Grapplement
Grapplement Grapple*ment, n. A grappling; close fight or embrace. [Obs.] --Spenser.
Ingrapple
Ingrapple In*grap"ple, v. t. & i. To seize; to clutch; to grapple. [Obs.] --Drayton.
Johnapple
Apple-john Ap"ple-john`, n.. A kind of apple which by keeping becomes much withered; -- called also Johnapple. --Shak.
Kangaroo apple
Kangaroo apple (Bot.), the edible fruit of the Tasmanian plant Solanum aviculare. Kangaroo grass (Bot.), a perennial Australian forage grass (Anthistiria australis). Kangaroo hare (Zo["o]l.), the jerboa kangaroo. See under Jerboa. Kangaroo mouse. (Zo["o]l.) See Jumping mouse, under Jumping. Kangaroo rat (Zo["o]l.), the potoroo.
Knapple
Knapple Knap"ple, v. i. [Freq. of knap, v., cf. D. knabbelen to gnaw.] To break off with an abrupt, sharp noise; to bite; to nibble. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.]
love apple
Tomato To*ma"to, n.; pl. Tomatoes. [Sp. or Pg. tomate, of American Indian origin; cf. Mexican tomail.] (Bot.) The fruit of a plant of the Nightshade family (Lycopersicum esculentun); also, the plant itself. The fruit, which is called also love apple, is usually of a rounded, flattened form, but often irregular in shape. It is of a bright red or yellow color, and is eaten either cooked or uncooked. Tomato gall (Zo["o]l.), a large gall consisting of a mass of irregular swellings on the stems and leaves of grapevines. They are yellowish green, somewhat tinged with red, and produced by the larva of a small two-winged fly (Lasioptera vitis). Tomato sphinx (Zo["o]l.), the adult or imago of the tomato worm. It closely resembles the tobacco hawk moth. Called also tomato hawk moth. See Illust. of Hawk moth. Tomato worm (Zo["o]l.), the larva of a large hawk moth (Sphinx, or Macrosila, quinquemaculata) which feeds upon the leaves of the tomato and potato plants, often doing considerable damage. Called also potato worm.
Mad-apple
Mad-apple Mad"-ap`ple, n. (Bot.) See Eggplant.

Meaning of Apple from wikipedia

- An apple is a sweet, edible fruit produced by an apple tree (Malus domestica). Apple trees are cultivated worldwide and are the most widely grown species...
- Store, Apple Music, Apple TV+, iMessage, and iCloud. Other services include Apple Store, Genius Bar, AppleCare, Apple Pay, Apple Pay Cash, and Apple Card...
- apple is a pomaceous edible fruit of a temperate-zone deciduous tree. Apple, apples, or APPLE may also refer to: List of apple cultivars Cashew apple...
- is a line of smartphones designed and marketed by Apple Inc. All generations of the iPhone use Apple's iOS mobile operating system software. The first-generation...
- Apple TV is a digital media player and microconsole developed and sold by Apple Inc. It is a small network appliance and entertainment device that can...
- EYE-pad) is a line of tablet computers designed, developed and marketed by Apple Inc., which run the iOS and iPadOS mobile operating systems. The first iPad...
- Apple Watch is a line of smar****ches designed, developed, and marketed by Apple Inc. It incorporates fitness tracking and health-oriented capabilities...
- Apple Card is a credit card developed by Apple Inc., designed primarily to be used with Apple Pay on Apple devices such as an iPhone, iPad, Apple Watch...
- Apple A13 Bionic is a 64-bit ARM-based system on a chip (SoC), designed by Apple Inc. It includes machine learning hardware acceleration that Apple claims...
- Apple TV+ (pronounced Apple TV Plus) is an upcoming American over-the-top ad-free subscription video on demand web television service announced by Apple...
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