Definition of upon. Meaning of upon. Synonyms of upon

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Definition of upon

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Lot Lot, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Lotted; p. pr. & vb. n. Lotting.] To allot; to sort; to portion. [R.] To lot on or upon, to count or reckon upon; to expect with pleasure. [Colloq. U. S.]
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Win Win, v. i. To gain the victory; to be successful; to triumph; to prevail. Nor is it aught but just That he, who in debate of truth hath won, should win in arms. --Milton. To win of, to be conqueror over. [Obs.] --Shak. To win on or upon. (a) To gain favor or influence with. ``You have a softness and beneficence winning on the hearts of others.' --Dryden. (b) To gain ground on. ``The rabble . . . will in time win upon power.' --Shak.
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Now strike your saile, ye jolly mariners, For we be come unto a quiet rode [road]. --Spenser. On, or Upon, the road, traveling or passing over a road; coming or going; on the way. My hat and wig will soon be here, They are upon the road. --Cowper. Road agent, a highwayman, especially on the stage routes of the unsettled western parts of the United States; -- a humorous euphemism. [Western U.S.] The highway robber -- road agent he is quaintly called. --The century. Road book, a quidebook in respect to roads and distances. Road metal, the broken, stone used in macadamizing roads. Road roller, a heavy roller, or combinations of rollers, for making earth, macadam, or concrete roads smooth and compact. -- often driven by steam. Road runner (Zo["o]l.), the chaparral cock. Road steamer, a locomotive engine adapted to running on common roads. To go on the road, to engage in the business of a commercial traveler. [Colloq.] To take the road, to begin or engage in traveling. To take to the road, to engage in robbery upon the highways. Syn: Way; highway; street; lane; pathway; route; passage; course. See Way.
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Settle Set"tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Settled; p. pr. & vb. n. Settling.] [OE. setlen, AS. setlan. [root]154. See Settle, n. In senses 7, 8, and 9 perhaps confused with OE. sahtlen to reconcile, AS. sahtlian, fr. saht reconciliation, sacon to contend, dispute. Cf. Sake.] 1. To place in a fixed or permanent condition; to make firm, steady, or stable; to establish; to fix; esp., to establish in life; to fix in business, in a home, or the like. And he settled his countenance steadfastly upon him, until he was ashamed. --2 Kings viii. 11. (Rev. Ver.) The father thought the time drew on Of setting in the world his only son. --Dryden. 2. To establish in the pastoral office; to ordain or install as pastor or rector of a church, society, or parish; as, to settle a minister. [U. S.] 3. To cause to be no longer in a disturbed condition; to render quiet; to still; to calm; to compose. God settled then the huge whale-bearing lake. --Chapman. Hoping that sleep might settle his brains. --Bunyan. 4. To clear of dregs and impurities by causing them to sink; to render pure or clear; -- said of a liquid; as, to settle coffee, or the grounds of coffee. 5. To restore or bring to a smooth, dry, or passable condition; -- said of the ground, of roads, and the like; as, clear weather settles the roads. 6. To cause to sink; to lower; to depress; hence, also, to render close or compact; as, to settle the contents of a barrel or bag by shaking it. 7. To determine, as something which is exposed to doubt or question; to free from unscertainty or wavering; to make sure, firm, or constant; to establish; to compose; to quiet; as, to settle the mind when agitated; to settle questions of law; to settle the succession to a throne; to settle an allowance. It will settle the wavering, and confirm the doubtful. --Swift. 8. To adjust, as something in discussion; to make up; to compose; to pacify; as, to settle a quarrel. 9. To adjust, as accounts; to liquidate; to balance; as, to settle an account. 10. Hence, to pay; as, to settle a bill. [Colloq.] --Abbott. 11. To plant with inhabitants; to colonize; to people; as, the French first settled Canada; the Puritans settled New England; Plymouth was settled in 1620. To settle on or upon, to confer upon by permanent grant; to assure to. ``I . . . have settled upon him a good annuity.' --Addison. To settle the land (Naut.), to cause it to sink, or appear lower, by receding from it. Syn: To fix; establish; regulate; arrange; compose; adjust; determine; decide.
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Spring Spring, v. i. [imp. Sprangor Sprung; p. p. Sprung; p. pr. & vb. n. Springing.] [AS. springan; akin to D. & G. springen, OS. & OHG. springan, Icel. & Sw. springa, Dan. springe; cf. Gr. ? to hasten. Cf. Springe, Sprinkle.] 1. To leap; to bound; to jump. The mountain stag that springs From height to height, and bounds along the plains. --Philips. 2. To issue with speed and violence; to move with activity; to dart; to shoot. And sudden light Sprung through the vaulted roof. --Dryden. 3. To start or rise suddenly, as from a covert. Watchful as fowlers when their game will spring. --Otway. 4. To fly back; as, a bow, when bent, springs back by its elastic power. 5. To bend from a straight direction or plane surface; to become warped; as, a piece of timber, or a plank, sometimes springs in seasoning. 6. To shoot up, out, or forth; to come to the light; to begin to appear; to emerge; as a plant from its seed, as streams from their source, and the like; -often followed by up, forth, or out. Till well nigh the day began to spring. --Chaucer. To satisfy the desolate and waste ground, and to cause the bud of the tender herb to spring forth. --Job xxxviii. 27. Do not blast my springing hopes. --Rowe. O, spring to light; auspicious Babe, be born. --Pope. 7. To issue or proceed, as from a parent or ancestor; to result, as from a cause, motive, reason, or principle. [They found] new hope to spring Out of despair, joy, but with fear yet linked. --Milton. 8. To grow; to prosper. What makes all this, but Jupiter the king, At whose command we perish, and we spring? --Dryden. To spring at, to leap toward; to attempt to reach by a leap. To spring forth, to leap out; to rush out. To spring in, to rush in; to enter with a leap or in haste. To spring on or upon, to leap on; to rush on with haste or violence; to assault.
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Spit Spit, v. i. 1. To throw out saliva from the mouth. 2. To rain or snow slightly, or with sprinkles. It had been spitting with rain. --Dickens. To spit on or upon, to insult grossly; to treat with contempt. ``Spitting upon all antiquity.' --South.
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Tapis Ta"pis, n. [F. See Tapestry.] Tapestry; formerly, the cover of a council table. On, or Upon, the tapis, on the table, or under consideration; as, to lay a motion in Parliament on the tapis.
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Prey Prey, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Preyed; p. pr. & vb. n. Preying.] [OF. preier, preer, L. praedari, fr. praeda. See Prey, n.] To take booty; to gather spoil; to ravage; to take food by violence. More pity that the eagle should be mewed, While kites and buzzards prey at liberty. --Shak. To prey on or upon. (a) To take prey from; to despoil; to pillage; to rob. --Shak. (b) To seize as prey; to take for food by violence; to seize and devour. --Shak. (c) To wear away gradually; to cause to waste or pine away; as, the trouble preyed upon his mind. --Addison.
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Touch Touch, v. i. 1. To be in contact; to be in a state of junction, so that no space is between; as, two spheres touch only at points. --Johnson. 2. To fasten; to take effect; to make impression. [R.] Strong waters pierce metals, and will touch upon gold, that will not touch upon silver. --Bacon. 3. To treat anything in discourse, especially in a slight or casual manner; -- often with on or upon. If the antiquaries have touched upon it, they immediately quitted it. --Addison. 4. (Naut) To be brought, as a sail, so close to the wind that its weather leech shakes. To touch and go (Naut.), to touch bottom lightly and without damage, as a vessel in motion. To touch at, to come or go to, without tarrying; as, the ship touched at Lisbon. To touch on or upon, to come or go to for a short time. [R.] I made a little voyage round the lake, and touched on the several towns that lie on its coasts. --Addison.
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Upon Up*on", prep.[AS. uppan, uppon; upp up + on, an, on. See Up, and On.] On; -- used in all the senses of that word, with which it is interchangeable. ``Upon an hill of flowers.' --Chaucer. Our host upon his stirrups stood anon. --Chaucer. Thou shalt take of the blood that is upon the altar. --Ex. xxix. 21. The Philistines be upon thee, Samson. --Judg. xvi. 9. As I did stand my watch upon the hill. --Shak. He made a great difference between people that did rebel upon wantonness, and them that did rebel upon want. --Bacon. This advantage we lost upon the invention of firearms. --Addison. Upon the whole, it will be necessary to avoid that perpetual repetition of the same epithets which we find in Homer. --Pope. He had abandoned the frontiers, retiring upon Glasgow. --Sir. W. Scott. Philip swore upon the Evangelists to abstain from aggression in my absence. --Landor. Note: Upon conveys a more distinct notion that on carries with it of something that literally or metaphorically bears or supports. It is less employed than it used to be, on having for the most part taken its place. Some expressions formed with it belong only to old style; as, upon pity they were taken away; that is, in consequence of pity: upon the rate of thirty thousand; that is, amounting to the rate: to die upon the hand; that is, by means of the hand: he had a garment upon; that is, upon himself: the time is coming fast upon; that is, upon the present time. By the omission of its object, upon acquires an adverbial sense, as in the last two examples. To assure upon (Law), to promise; to undertake. To come upon. See under Come. To take upon, to assume.
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Down Down, adv. [For older adown, AS. ad?n, ad?ne, prop., from or off the hill. See 3d Down, and cf. Adown, and cf. Adown.] 1. In the direction of gravity or toward the center of the earth; toward or in a lower place or position; below; -- the opposite of up. 2. Hence, in many derived uses, as: (a) From a higher to a lower position, literally or figuratively; in a descending direction; from the top of an ascent; from an upright position; to the ground or floor; to or into a lower or an inferior condition; as, into a state of humility, disgrace, misery, and the like; into a state of rest; -- used with verbs indicating motion. It will be rain to-night. Let it come down. --Shak. I sit me down beside the hazel grove. --Tennyson. And that drags down his life. --Tennyson. There is not a more melancholy object in the learned world than a man who has written himself down. --Addison. The French . . . shone down [i. e., outshone] the English. --Shak. (b) In a low or the lowest position, literally or figuratively; at the bottom of a decent; below the horizon; of the ground; in a condition of humility, dejection, misery, and the like; in a state of quiet. I was down and out of breath. --Shak. The moon is down; I have not heard the clock. --Shak. He that is down needs fear no fall. --Bunyan. 3. From a remoter or higher antiquity. Venerable men! you have come down to us from a former generation. --D. Webster. 4. From a greater to a less bulk, or from a thinner to a thicker consistence; as, to boil down in cookery, or in making decoctions. --Arbuthnot. Note: Down is sometimes used elliptically, standing for go down, come down, tear down, take down, put down, haul down, pay down, and the like, especially in command or exclamation. Down, therefore, and beg mercy of the duke. --Shak. If he be hungry more than wanton, bread alone will down. --Locke. Down is also used intensively; as, to be loaded down; to fall down; to hang down; to drop down; to pay down. The temple of Her[`e] at Argos was burnt down. --Jowett (Thucyd. ). Down, as well as up, is sometimes used in a conventional sense; as, down East. Persons in London say down to Scotland, etc., and those in the provinces, up to London. --Stormonth. Down helm (Naut.), an order to the helmsman to put the helm to leeward. Down on or upon (joined with a verb indicating motion, as go, come, pounce), to attack, implying the idea of threatening power. Come down upon us with a mighty power. --Shak. Down with, take down, throw down, put down; -- used in energetic command. ``Down with the palace; fire it.' --Dryden. To be down on, to dislike and treat harshly. [Slang, U.S.] To cry down. See under Cry, v. t. To cut down. See under Cut, v. t. Up and down, with rising and falling motion; to and fro; hither and thither; everywhere. ``Let them wander up and down.' --Ps. lix. 15.
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Gain Gain, v. i. To have or receive advantage or profit; to acquire gain; to grow rich; to advance in interest, health, or happiness; to make progress; as, the sick man gains daily. Thou hast greedily gained of thy neighbors by extortion. --Ezek. xxii. 12. Gaining twist, in rifled firearms, a twist of the grooves, which increases regularly from the breech to the muzzle. To gain on or upon. (a) To encroach on; as, the ocean gains on the land. (b) To obtain influence with. (c) To win ground upon; to move faster than, as in a race or contest. (d) To get the better of; to have the advantage of. The English have not only gained upon the Venetians in the Levant, but have their cloth in Venice itself. --Addison. My good behavior had so far gained on the emperor, that I began to conceive hopes of liberty. --Swift.
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Hit Hit, v. i. 1. To meet or come in contact; to strike; to clash; -- followed by against or on. If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another? --Locke. Corpuscles, meeting with or hitting on those bodies, become conjoined with them. --Woodward. 2. To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, -- often with implied chance, or luck. And oft it hits Where hope is coldest and despair most fits. --Shak. And millions miss for one that hits. --Swift. To hit on or upon, to light upon; to come to by chance. ``None of them hit upon the art.' --Addison.
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Impose Im*pose", v. i. To practice trick or deception. To impose on or upon, to pass or put a trick on; to delude. ``He imposes on himself, and mistakes words for things.' --Locke.
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Improve Im*prove", v. i. 1. To grow better; to advance or make progress in what is desirable; to make or show improvement; as, to improve in health. We take care to improve in our frugality and diligence. --Atterbury. 2. To advance or progress in bad qualities; to grow worse. ``Domitain improved in cruelty.' --Milner. 3. To increase; to be enhanced; to rise in value; as, the price of cotton improves. To improve on or upon, to make useful additions or amendments to, or changes in; to bring nearer to perfection; as, to improve on the mode of tillage.

Meaning of upon from wikipedia

- have an article on Upon, but our sister project Wiktionary does: Read the Wiktionary entry on Upon You can also: Search for Upon in Wikipedia to check...
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