Definition of Rhyme. Meaning of Rhyme. Synonyms of Rhyme

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Rhyme. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Rhyme and, of course, Rhyme synonyms and on the right images related to the word Rhyme.

Definition of Rhyme

Rhyme
Rhyme Rhyme, n. [OE. ryme, rime, AS. r[=i]m number; akin to OHG. r[=i]m number, succession, series, G. reim rhyme. The modern sense is due to the influence of F. rime, which is of German origin, and originally the same word.] [The Old English spelling rime is becoming again common. See Note under Prime.] 1. An expression of thought in numbers, measure, or verse; a composition in verse; a rhymed tale; poetry; harmony of language. ``Railing rhymes.' --Daniel. A ryme I learned long ago. --Chaucer. He knew Himself to sing, and build the lofty rime. --Milton. 2. (Pros.) Correspondence of sound in the terminating words or syllables of two or more verses, one succeeding another immediately or at no great distance. The words or syllables so used must not begin with the same consonant, or if one begins with a vowel the other must begin with a consonant. The vowel sounds and accents must be the same, as also the sounds of the final consonants if there be any. For rhyme with reason may dispense, And sound has right to govern sense. --Prior. 3. Verses, usually two, having this correspondence with each other; a couplet; a poem containing rhymes. 4. A word answering in sound to another word. Female rhyme. See under Female. Male rhyme. See under Male. Rhyme or reason, sound or sense. Rhyme royal (Pros.), a stanza of seven decasyllabic verses, of which the first and third, the second, fourth, and fifth, and the sixth and seventh rhyme.
Rhyme
Rhyme Rhyme, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Rhymed;p. pr. & vb. n. Rhyming.] [OE. rimen, rymen, AS. r[=i]man to count: cf. F. rimer to rhyme. See Rhyme, n.] 1. To make rhymes, or verses. ``Thou shalt no longer ryme.' --Chaucer. There marched the bard and blockhead, side by side, Who rhymed for hire, and patronized for pride. --Pope. 2. To accord in rhyme or sound. And, if they rhymed and rattled, all was well. --Dryden.
Rhyme
Rhyme Rhyme, v. t. 1. To put into rhyme. --Sir T. Wilson. 2. To influence by rhyme. Hearken to a verser, who may chance Rhyme thee to good. --Herbert.

Meaning of Rhyme from wikipedia

- A rhyme is a repetition of similar sounds (usually, exactly the same sound) in the final stressed syllables and any following syllables of two or more...
- Goose rhymes is interchangeable with nursery rhymes. From the mid-16th century nursery rhymes begin to be recorded in ****o and most po****r rhymes date...
- A rhyme scheme is the pattern of rhymes at the end of each line of a poem or song. It is usually referred to by using letters to indicate which lines...
- "One for Sorrow" is a traditional children's nursery rhyme about magpies. According to an old superstition, the number of magpies one sees determines...
- Trevor George Smith Jr. (born May 20, 1972), known professionally as Busta Rhymes, is an American rapper, singer, musician, record producer, record executive...
- "Sticks and Stones" is an English-language children's rhyme. The rhyme persuades the child victim of name-calling to ignore the taunt, to refrain from...
- Rhymer may refer to: Rhymer (actor), an actor in a seasonal folk play Rhymer (poet), a bad poet Thomas the Rhymer, 13th century Scottish laird and reputed...
- traditional English nursery rhyme. The Roud Folk Song Index cl****ifies this tune and its variations as number 10266. The rhyme dates back at least to the...
- "Solomon Grundy" is an English nursery rhyme. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 19299. The rhyme has varied very little since it was first collected...
- "Baa, Baa, Black Sheep" is an English nursery rhyme, the earliest surviving version of which dates from 1731. The words have not changed very much in...
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