Definition of Marin. Meaning of Marin. Synonyms of Marin

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Definition of Marin

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AElurichthys marinus
Sea catfish Sea" cat`fish Sea cat Sea" cat` (Zo["o]l.) (a) The wolf fish. (b) Any marine siluroid fish, as [AE]lurichthys marinus, and Arinus felis, of the eastern coast of the United States. Many species are found on the coasts of Central and South America.
Amarine
Amarine Am"a*rine, n. [L. amarus bitter.] (Chem.) A characteristic crystalline substance, obtained from oil of bitter almonds.
Aqua marina
Aqua A"qua, n. [L. See Ewer.] Water; -- a word much used in pharmacy and the old chemistry, in various signification, determined by the word or words annexed. Aqua ammoni[ae], the aqueous solution of ammonia; liquid ammonia; often called aqua ammonia. Aqua marine, or Aqua marina. Same as Aquamarine. Aqua regia. [L., royal water] (Chem.), a very corrosive fuming yellow liquid consisting of nitric and hydrochloric acids. It has the power of dissolving gold, the ``royal' metal. Aqua Tofana, a fluid containing arsenic, and used for secret poisoning, made by an Italian woman named Tofana, in the middle of the 17th century, who is said to have poisoned more than 600 persons. --Francis. Aqua vit[ae][L., water of life. Cf. Eau de vie, Usquebaugh], a name given to brandy and some other ardent spirits. --Shak.
Aqua marine
Aqua A"qua, n. [L. See Ewer.] Water; -- a word much used in pharmacy and the old chemistry, in various signification, determined by the word or words annexed. Aqua ammoni[ae], the aqueous solution of ammonia; liquid ammonia; often called aqua ammonia. Aqua marine, or Aqua marina. Same as Aquamarine. Aqua regia. [L., royal water] (Chem.), a very corrosive fuming yellow liquid consisting of nitric and hydrochloric acids. It has the power of dissolving gold, the ``royal' metal. Aqua Tofana, a fluid containing arsenic, and used for secret poisoning, made by an Italian woman named Tofana, in the middle of the 17th century, who is said to have poisoned more than 600 persons. --Francis. Aqua vit[ae][L., water of life. Cf. Eau de vie, Usquebaugh], a name given to brandy and some other ardent spirits. --Shak.
Aquamarine
Aquamarine A`qua*ma*rine", n. (Min.) A transparent, pale green variety of beryl, used as a gem. See Beryl.
Arenicola marina
Lugworm Lug"worm`, n. [1st lug + worm.] (Zo["o]l.) A large marine annelid (Arenicola marina) having a row of tufted gills along each side of the back. It is found burrowing in sandy beaches, both in America and Europe, and is used for bait by European fishermen. Called also lobworm, and baitworm.
Convallamarin
Convallamarin Con*val"la*ma`rin, n. [Convallaria + L. amarus bitter.] (Chem.) A white, crystalline, poisonous substance, regarded as a glucoside, extracted from the lily of the valley (Convallaria Majalis). Its taste is first bitter, then sweet.
Coumarin
Coumarin Cou"ma*rin (k[=oo]"m[.a]*r[i^]n), n. [F., fr. coumarou, a tree of Guiana.] (Chem.) The concrete essence of the tonka bean, the fruit of Dipterix (formerly Coumarouna) odorata and consisting essentially of coumarin proper, which is a white crystalline substance, C9H6O2, of vanilla-like odor, regarded as an anhydride of coumaric acid, and used in flavoring. Coumarin in also made artificially.
Customariness
Customariness Cus"tom*a*ri*ness, n. Quality of being customary.
Dulcamarin
Dulcamarin Dul`ca*ma"rin, n. (Chem.) A glucoside extracted from the bittersweet (Solanum Dulcamara), as a yellow amorphous substance. It probably occasions the compound taste. See Bittersweet, 3 (a) .
Fluvio-marine
Fluvio-marine Flu`vi*o-ma*rine", a. [L. fluvius river + E. marine.] (Geol.) Formed by the joint action of a river and the sea, as deposits at the mouths of rivers.
Fumarine
Fumarine Fu"ma*rine, n. [L. fumus smoke, fume.] (Chem.) An alkaloid extracted from fumitory, as a white crystalline substance.
Green ultramarine
Ultramarine Ul`tra*ma*rine", n. [Cf. Sp. ultramarino. So called because the lapis lazuli was originally brought from beyond the sea, -- from Asia.] (Chem.) A blue pigment formerly obtained by powdering lapis lazuli, but now produced in large quantities by fusing together silica, alumina, soda, and sulphur, thus forming a glass, colored blue by the sodium polysulphides made in the fusion. Also used adjectively. Green ultramarine, a green pigment obtained as a first product in the manufacture of ultramarine, into which it is changed by subsequent treatment. Ultramarine ash or ashes (Paint.), a pigment which is the residuum of lapis lazuli after the ultramarine has been extracted. It was used by the old masters as a middle or neutral tint for flesh, skies, and draperies, being of a purer and tenderer gray that produced by the mixture of more positive colors. --Fairholt.
hydroxy-coumarin
Umbelliferone Um`bel*lif"er*one, n. (Chem.) A tasteless white crystalline substance, C9H6O3, found in the bark of a certain plant (Daphne Mezereum), and also obtained by the distillation of certain gums from the Umbellifer[ae], as galbanum, asafetida, etc. It is analogous to coumarin. Called also hydroxy-coumarin.
Larus marinus
Waggel Wag"gel (w[a^]g"g[e^]l), n. (Zo["o]l.) The young of the great black-backed gull (Larus marinus), formerly considered a distinct species. [Prov. Eng.]
Larus marinus
Saddleback Sad"dle*back`, n. 1. Anything saddle-backed; esp., a hill or ridge having a concave outline at the top. 2. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The harp seal. (b) The great blackbacked gull (Larus marinus). (c) The larva of a bombycid moth (Empretia stimulea) which has a large, bright green, saddle-shaped patch of color on the back.
Larus marinus
Swartback Swart"back`, n. (Zo["o]l.) The black-backed gull (Larus marinus); -- called also swarbie. [Prov. Eng.]
Marinade
Marinade Mar`i*nade", n. [F.: cf. It. marinato marinade, F. mariner to preserve food for use at sea. See Marinate.] (Cookery) A brine or pickle containing wine and spices, for enriching the flavor of meat and fish.
Marinate
Marinate Mar"i*nate, v. t. [See Marine, and cf. Marinade.] To salt or pickle, as fish, and then preserve in oil or vinegar; to prepare by the use of marinade.
Marine
Marine Ma*rine", a. [L. marinus, fr. mare the sea: cf. F. marin. See Mere a pool.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sea; having to do with the ocean, or with navigation or naval affairs; nautical; as, marine productions or bodies; marine shells; a marine engine. 2. (Geol.) Formed by the action of the currents or waves of the sea; as, marine deposits. Marine acid (Chem.), hydrochloric acid. [Obs.] Marine barometer. See under Barometer. Marine corps, a corps formed of the officers, noncommissioned officers, privates, and musicants of marines.
Marine
Marine Ma*rine", n. [F. marin a sea solider, marine naval economy, a marine picture, fr. L. marinus. See Marine, a.] 1. A solider serving on shipboard; a sea soldier; one of a body of troops trained to do duty in the navy.
marine acid
Muriatic Mu`ri*at"ic, a. [L. muriaticus pickled, from muria brine: cf. F. muriatique.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, sea salt, or from chlorine, one of the constituents of sea salt; hydrochloric. Muriatic acid, hydrochloric acid, HCl; -- formerly called also marine acid, and spirit of salt. See hydrochloric, and the Note under Muriate.
Marine acid
Marine Ma*rine", a. [L. marinus, fr. mare the sea: cf. F. marin. See Mere a pool.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sea; having to do with the ocean, or with navigation or naval affairs; nautical; as, marine productions or bodies; marine shells; a marine engine. 2. (Geol.) Formed by the action of the currents or waves of the sea; as, marine deposits. Marine acid (Chem.), hydrochloric acid. [Obs.] Marine barometer. See under Barometer. Marine corps, a corps formed of the officers, noncommissioned officers, privates, and musicants of marines.
Marine barometer
Barometer Ba*rom"e*ter, n. [Gr. ? weight + -meter: cf. F. barom[`e]tre.] An instrument for determining the weight or pressure of the atmosphere, and hence for judging of the probable changes of weather, or for ascertaining the height of any ascent. Note: The barometer was invented by Torricelli at Florence about 1643. It is made in its simplest form by filling a graduated glass tube about 34 inches long with mercury and inverting it in a cup containing mercury. The column of mercury in the tube descends until balanced by the weight of the atmosphere, and its rise or fall under varying conditions is a measure of the change in the atmospheric pressure. At the sea level its ordinary height is about 30 inches (760 millimeters). See Sympiesometer. --Nichol. Aneroid barometer. See Aneroid barometer, under Aneroid. Marine barometer, a barometer with tube contracted at bottom to prevent rapid oscillations of the mercury, and suspended in gimbals from an arm or support on shipboard. Mountain barometer, a portable mercurial barometer with tripod support, and long scale, for measuring heights. Siphon barometer, a barometer having a tube bent like a hook with the longer leg closed at the top. The height of the mercury in the longer leg shows the pressure of the atmosphere. Wheel barometer, a barometer with recurved tube, and a float, from which a cord passes over a pulley and moves an index.
Marine barometer
Marine Ma*rine", a. [L. marinus, fr. mare the sea: cf. F. marin. See Mere a pool.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sea; having to do with the ocean, or with navigation or naval affairs; nautical; as, marine productions or bodies; marine shells; a marine engine. 2. (Geol.) Formed by the action of the currents or waves of the sea; as, marine deposits. Marine acid (Chem.), hydrochloric acid. [Obs.] Marine barometer. See under Barometer. Marine corps, a corps formed of the officers, noncommissioned officers, privates, and musicants of marines.
marine belt
Territorial waters Ter`ri*to"ri*al wa"ters (Internat. Law) The waters under the territorial jurisdiction of a state; specif., the belt (often called the marine belt or territorial sea) of sea subject to such jurisdiction, and subject only to the right of innocent passage by the vessels of other states. Perhaps it may be said without impropriety that a state has theoretically the right to extend its territorial waters from time to time at its will with the increased range of guns. Whether it would in practice be judicious to do so . . . is a widely different matter . . . . In any case the custom of regulating a line three miles from land as defining the boundary of marginal territorial waters is so far fixed that a state must be supposed to accept it in absence of express notice. --W. E. Hall.
Marine corps
Marine Ma*rine", a. [L. marinus, fr. mare the sea: cf. F. marin. See Mere a pool.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sea; having to do with the ocean, or with navigation or naval affairs; nautical; as, marine productions or bodies; marine shells; a marine engine. 2. (Geol.) Formed by the action of the currents or waves of the sea; as, marine deposits. Marine acid (Chem.), hydrochloric acid. [Obs.] Marine barometer. See under Barometer. Marine corps, a corps formed of the officers, noncommissioned officers, privates, and musicants of marines.
Marine engine
Marine engine (Mech.), a steam engine for propelling a vessel. Marine glue. See under Glue. Marine insurance, insurance against the perils of the sea, including also risks of fire, piracy, and barratry. Marine interest, interest at any rate agreed on for money lent upon respondentia and bottomry bonds. Marine law. See under Law. Marine league, three geographical miles. Marine metal, an alloy of lead, antimony, and mercury, made for sheathing ships. --Mc Elrath. Marine soap, cocoanut oil soap; -- so called because, being quite soluble in salt water, it is much used on shipboard. Marine store, a store where old canvas, ropes, etc., are bought and sold; a junk shop. [Eng.]
Marine glue
Marine engine (Mech.), a steam engine for propelling a vessel. Marine glue. See under Glue. Marine insurance, insurance against the perils of the sea, including also risks of fire, piracy, and barratry. Marine interest, interest at any rate agreed on for money lent upon respondentia and bottomry bonds. Marine law. See under Law. Marine league, three geographical miles. Marine metal, an alloy of lead, antimony, and mercury, made for sheathing ships. --Mc Elrath. Marine soap, cocoanut oil soap; -- so called because, being quite soluble in salt water, it is much used on shipboard. Marine store, a store where old canvas, ropes, etc., are bought and sold; a junk shop. [Eng.]
Marine glue
Glue Glue, n. [F. glu, L. glus, akin to gluten, from gluere to draw together. Cf. Gluten.] A hard brittle brownish gelatin, obtained by boiling to a jelly the skins, hoofs, etc., of animals. When gently heated with water, it becomes viscid and tenaceous, and is used as a cement for uniting substances. The name is also given to other adhesive or viscous substances. Bee glue. See under Bee. Fish glue, a strong kind of glue obtained from fish skins and bladders; isinglass. Glue plant (Bot.), a fucoid seaweed (Gloiopeltis tenax). Liquid glue, a fluid preparation of glue and acetic acid oralcohol. Marine glue, a solution of caoutchouc in naphtha, with shellac, used in shipbuilding.

Meaning of Marin from wikipedia

- player Marin City, California Marin County, California Marin Cr****, California The Marin Headlands, California Marin Hills, in southern Marin County,...
- Marin County /məˈrɪn/ is a county located in the San Francisco Bay Area of the U.S. state of California. As of the 2010 census, the po****tion was 252...
- Richard Anthony "Cheech" Marin (born July 13, 1946) is an American stand-up comedian, actor, voice actor, writer and activist[citation needed] who gained...
- Marin Čilić (Croatian pronunciation: [mâriːn tʃǐːlitɕ]; born 28 September 1988) is a Croatian professional tennis player. Over the course of his career...
- MARIN, the Maritime Research Institute Netherlands, is one of the leading institutes[citation needed] in the world for hydrodynamic research and maritime...
- Jang Gyeong-Hwan (Korean: 장경환) better known by his in-game name MaRin, is a professional League of Legends player who now playing as the Top Laner for...
- Marin Elizabeth Hinkle (born March 23, 1966) is an American actress. Among many television and movie roles, she is best known for playing Judith Harper-Melnick...
- Răzvan Gabriel Marin (Romanian pronunciation: [rəzˈvan ɡabriˈel maˈrin]; born 23 May 1996) is a Romanian professional footballer who plays as a midfielder...
- Marin Yvonne Ireland (born August 30, 1979) is an American stage, film, and television actress. In 2009, she won the Theatre World Award and was nominated...
- Guadalupe "Lupe" Marín (October 16, 1895 – September 16, 1983), born María Guadalupe Marín Preciado, was a Mexican model and novelist. Marín was born in Ciudad...
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