Definition of Canadensis. Meaning of Canadensis. Synonyms of Canadensis

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Definition of Canadensis

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A Canadensis
Shad Shad (sh[a^]d), n. sing. & pl. [AS. sceadda a kind of fish, akin to Prov. G. schade; cf. Ir. & Gael. sgadan a herring, W. ysgadan herrings; all perhaps akin to E. skate a fish.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of food fishes of the Herring family. The American species (Clupea sapidissima), which is abundant on the Atlantic coast and ascends the larger rivers in spring to spawn, is an important market fish. The European allice shad, or alose (C. alosa), and the twaite shad. (C. finta), are less important species. [Written also chad.] Note: The name is loosely applied, also, to several other fishes, as the gizzard shad (see under Gizzard), called also mud shad, white-eyed shad, and winter shad. Hardboaded, or Yellow-tailed, shad, the menhaden. Hickory, or Tailor, shad, the mattowacca. Long-boned shad, one of several species of important food fishes of the Bermudas and the West Indies, of the genus Gerres. Shad bush (Bot.), a name given to the North American shrubs or small trees of the rosaceous genus Amelanchier (A. Canadensis, and A. alnifolia) Their white racemose blossoms open in April or May, when the shad appear, and the edible berries (pomes) ripen in June or July, whence they are called Juneberries. The plant is also called service tree, and Juneberry. Shad frog, an American spotted frog (Rana halecina); -- so called because it usually appears at the time when the shad begin to run in the rivers. Trout shad, the squeteague. White shad, the common shad.
A Canadensis
Columbine Col"um*bine, n. [LL. columbina, L. columbinus dovelike, fr. columba dove: cf. F. colombine. Perh. so called from the beaklike spurs of its flowers.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of several species of the genus Aquilegia; as, A. vulgaris, or the common garden columbine; A. Canadensis, the wild red columbine of North America. 2. The mistress or sweetheart of Harlequin in pantomimes. --Brewer.
Abies or Tsuga Canadensis
Hemlock Hem"lock, n. [OE. hemeluc, humloc, AS. hemlic, hymlic.] 1. (Bot.) The name of several poisonous umbelliferous herbs having finely cut leaves and small white flowers, as the Cicuta maculata, bulbifera, and virosa, and the Conium maculatum. See Conium. Note: The potion of hemlock administered to Socrates is by some thought to have been a decoction of Cicuta virosa, or water hemlock, by others, of Conium maculatum. 2. (Bot.) An evergreen tree common in North America (Abies, or Tsuga, Canadensis); hemlock spruce. The murmuring pines and the hemlocks. --Longfellow. 3. The wood or timber of the hemlock tree. Ground hemlock, or Dwarf hemlock. See under Ground.
Anarcharis or Elodea Canadensis
Pondweed Pond"weed`, n. (Bot.) Any aquatic plant of the genus Potamogeton, of which many species are found in ponds or slow-moving rivers. Choke pondweed, an American water weed (Anarcharis, or Elodea, Canadensis.) See Anacharis. Horned pondweed, the Zannichellia palustris, a slender, branching aquatic plant, having pointed nutlets.
Arabis Canadensis
Sickle Sic"kle, n. [OE. sikel, AS. sicol; akin to D. sikkel, G. sichel, OHG. sihhila, Dan. segel, segl, L. secula, fr. secare to cut; or perhaps from L. secula. See Saw a cutting instrument.] 1. A reaping instrument consisting of a steel blade curved into the form of a hook, and having a handle fitted on a tang. The sickle has one side of the blade notched, so as always to sharpen with a serrated edge. Cf. Reaping hook, under Reap. When corn has once felt the sickle, it has no more benefit from the sunshine. --Shak. 2. (Astron.) A group of stars in the constellation Leo. See Illust. of Leo. Sickle pod (Bot.), a kind of rock cress (Arabis Canadensis) having very long curved pods.
C Canadensis
Judas Ju"das, n. The disciple who betrayed Christ. Hence: A treacherous person; one who betrays under the semblance of friendship. -- a. Treacherous; betraying. Judas hole, a peephole or secret opening for spying. Judas kiss, a deceitful and treacherous kiss. Judas tree (Bot.), a leguminous tree of the genus Cercis, with pretty, rose-colored flowers in clusters along the branches. Judas is said to have hanged himself on a tree of this genus (C. Siliquastrum). C. Canadensis and C. occidentalis are the American species, and are called also redbud.
C Canadensis
Cornel Cor"nel (-n?l), n. [OF. cornille, cornoille, F. cornouille, cornel berry, LL. cornolium cornel tree, fr. L. cornus, fr. cornu horn, in allusion to the hardness of the wood. See Horn.] 1. (Bot.) The cornelian cherry (Cornus Mas), a European shrub with clusters of small, greenish flowers, followed by very acid but edible drupes resembling cherries. 2. Any species of the genus Cornus, as C. florida, the flowering cornel; C. stolonifera, the osier cornel; C. Canadensis, the dwarf cornel, or bunchberry.
Cervus Canadensis
Wapiti Wap"i*ti, n. [Probably the Iroquois name. Bartlett.] (Zo["o]l.) The American elk (Cervus Canadensis). It is closely related to the European red deer, which it somewhat exceeds in size. Note: By some writers it is thought to be a variety of the red deer, but it is considered a distinct species by others. It is noted for the large, branching antlers of the male.
Cervus Canadensis
Elk Elk, n. [Icel. elgr; akin to Sw. elg, AS. eolh, OHG. elaho, MHG. elch, cf. L. alces; perh. akin to E. eland.] (Zo["o]l.) A large deer, of several species. The European elk (Alces machlis or Cervus alces) is closely allied to the American moose. The American elk, or wapiti (Cervus Canadensis), is closely related to the European stag. See Moose, and Wapiti. Irish elk (Paleon.), a large, extinct, Quaternary deer (Cervus giganteus) with widely spreading antlers. Its remains have been found beneath the peat of swamps in Ireland and England. See Illustration in Appendix; also Illustration of Antler. Cape elk (Zo["o]l.), the eland.
Collinsonia Canadensis
Stoneroot Stone"root`, n. (Bot.) A North American plant (Collinsonia Canadensis) having a very hard root; horse balm. See Horse balm, under Horse.
Cornus Canadensis
Bunchberry Bunch"ber`ry, n. (Bot.) The dwarf cornel (Cornus Canadensis), which bears a dense cluster of bright red, edible berries.
D Canadensis
Grouse Grouse, n. sing. & pl. [Prob. after the analogy of mouse, mice, fr. the earlier grice, OF. griesche meor hen: cf. F. piegri[`e]che shrike.] (Zo["o]l.) Any of the numerous species of gallinaceous birds of the family Tetraonid[ae], and subfamily Tetraonin[ae], inhabiting Europe, Asia, and North America. They have plump bodies, strong, well-feathered legs, and usually mottled plumage. The group includes the ptarmigans (Lagopus), having feathered feet. Note: Among the European species are the red grouse (Lagopus Scoticus) and the hazel grouse (Bonasa betulina). See Capercaidzie, Ptarmigan, and Heath grouse. Among the most important American species are the ruffed grouse, or New England partridge (Bonasa umbellus); the sharp-tailed grouse (Pedioc[ae]tes phasianellus) of the West; the dusky blue, or pine grouse (Dendragapus obscurus) of the Rocky Mountains; the Canada grouse, or spruce partridge (D. Canadensis). See also Prairie hen, and Sage cock. The Old World sand grouse (Pterocles, etc.) belong to a very different family. See Pterocletes, and Sand grouse.
Dendragapus Canadensis
Spruce Spruce, n. [OE. Spruce or Pruse, Prussia, Prussian. So named because it was first known as a native of Prussia, or because its sprouts were used for making, spruce beer. Cf. Spruce beer, below, Spruce, a.] 1. (Bot.) Any coniferous tree of the genus Picea, as the Norway spruce (P. excelsa), and the white and black spruces of America (P. alba and P. nigra), besides several others in the far Northwest. See Picea. 2. The wood or timber of the spruce tree. 3. Prussia leather; pruce. [Obs.] Spruce, a sort of leather corruptly so called for Prussia leather. --E. Phillips. Douglas spruce (Bot.), a valuable timber tree (Pseudotsuga Douglasii) of Northwestern America. Essence of spruce, a thick, dark-colored, bitterish, and acidulous liquid made by evaporating a decoction of the young branches of spruce. Hemlock spruce (Bot.), a graceful coniferous tree (Tsuga Canadensis) of North America. Its timber is valuable, and the bark is largely used in tanning leather. Spruce beer. [G. sprossenbier; sprosse sprout, shoot (akin to E. sprout, n.) + bier beer. The word was changed into spruce because the beer came from Prussia (OE. Spruce), or because it was made from the sprouts of the spruce. See Sprout, n., Beer, and cf. Spruce, n.] A kind of beer which is tinctured or flavored with spruce, either by means of the extract or by decoction. Spruce grouse. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Spruce partridge, below. Spruce leather. See Spruce, n., 3. Spruce partridge (Zo["o]l.), a handsome American grouse (Dendragapus Canadensis) found in Canada and the Northern United States; -- called also Canada grouse.
E Canadensis
Lyme grass Lyme" grass` (Bot.) A coarse perennial grass of several species of Elymus, esp. E. Canadensis, and the European E. arenarius.
Epochra Canadensis
Currant Cur"rant (k?r"rant), n. [F. corinthe (raisins de Corinthe raisins of Corinth) currant (in sense 1), from the city of Corinth in Greece, whence, probably, the small dried grape (1) was first imported, the Ribes fruit (2) receiving the name from its resemblance to that grape.] 1. A small kind of seedless raisin, imported from the Levant, chiefly from Zante and Cephalonia; -- used in cookery. 2. The acid fruit or berry of the Ribes rubrum or common red currant, or of its variety, the white currant. 3. (Bot.) A shrub or bush of several species of the genus Ribes (a genus also including the gooseberry); esp., the Ribes rubrum. Black currant,a shrub or bush (Ribes nigrum and R. floridum) and its black, strong-flavored, tonic fruit. Cherry currant, a variety of the red currant, having a strong, symmetrical bush and a very large berry. Currant borer (Zo["o]l.), the larva of an insect that bores into the pith and kills currant bushes; specif., the larvae of a small clearwing moth ([AE]geria tipuliformis) and a longicorn beetle (Psenocerus supernotatus). Currant worm (Zo["o]l.), an insect larva which eats the leaves or fruit of the currant. The most injurious are the currant sawfly (Nematus ventricosus), introduced from Europe, and the spanworm (Eufitchia ribearia). The fruit worms are the larva of a fly (Epochra Canadensis), and a spanworm (Eupithecia). Flowering currant, Missouri currant, a species of Ribes (R. aureum), having showy yellow flowers.
Erigeron Canadensis
Horseweed Horse"weed`, n. (Bot.) A composite plant (Erigeron Canadensis), which is a common weed.
F Canadensis
Note: Among the well-known species are the European lynx (Felis borealis); the Canada lynx or loup-cervier (F. Canadensis); the bay lynx of America (F. rufa), and its western spotted variety (var. maculata); and the pardine lynx (F. pardina) of Southern Europe. 2. (Astron.) One of the northern constellations.
Glyceria Canadensis
Quaking bog, a bog of forming peat so saturated with water that it shakes when trodden upon. Quaking grass. (Bot.) (a) One of several grasses of the genus Briza, having slender-stalked and pendulous ovate spikelets, which quake and rattle in the wind. Briza maxima is the large quaking grass; B. media and B. minor are the smaller kinds. (b) Rattlesnake grass (Glyceria Canadensis).
Gymnocladus Canadensis
Kentucky Ken*tuck"y, n. One of the United States. Kentucky blue grass (Bot.), a valuable pasture and meadow grass (Poa pratensis), found in both Europe and America. See under Blue grass. Kentucky coffee tree (Bot.), a tall North American tree (Gymnocladus Canadensis) with bipinnate leaves. It produces large woody pods containing a few seeds which have been used as a substitute for coffee. The timber is very valuable.
Hidrastis Canadensis
Orangeroot Or"ange*root`, n. (Bot.) An American ranunculaceous plant (Hidrastis Canadensis), having a yellow tuberous root; -- also called yellowroot, golden seal, etc.
Hydrastis Canadensis
Xanthopuccine Xan`tho*puc"cine, n. [Xantho- + puccoon + -ine.] (Chem.) One of three alkaloids found in the root of the yellow puccoon (Hydrastis Canadensis). It is a yellow crystalline substance, and resembles berberine.
Hydrastis Canadensis
Hydrastine Hy*dras"tine, n. (Chem.) An alkaloid, found in the rootstock of the golden seal (Hydrastis Canadensis), and extracted as a bitter, white, crystalline substance. It is used as a tonic and febrifuge.
L Canadensis
Otter Ot"ter, n. [OE. oter, AS. otor; akin to D. & G. otter, Icel. otr, Dan. odder, Sw. utter, Lith. udra, Russ, vuidra, Gr. "y`dra water serpent, hydra, Skr. udra otter, and also to E. water. [root]137, 215. See Water, and cf. Hydra.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any carnivorous animal of the genus Lutra, and related genera. Several species are described. They have large, flattish heads, short ears, and webbed toes. They are aquatic, and feed on fish. Their fur is soft and valuable. The common otter of Europe is Lutra vulgaris; the American otter is L. Canadensis; other species inhabit South America and Asia. 2. (Zo["o]l.) The larva of the ghost moth. It is very injurious to hop vines. Otter hound, Otter dog (Zo["o]l.), a small breed of hounds, used in England for hunting otters. Otter sheep. See Ancon sheep, under Ancon. Otter shell (Zo["o]l.), very large bivalve mollusk (Schizoth[ae]rus Nuttallii) found on the northwest coast of America. It is excellent food, and is extensively used by the Indians. Sea otter. (Zo["o]l.) See in the Vocabulary.
Laportea Canadensis
Nettle Net"tle, n. [AS. netele; akin to D. netel, G. nessel, OHG. nezz["i]la, nazza, Dan. nelde, n["a]lde, Sw. n["a]ssla; cf, Lith. notere.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus Urtica, covered with minute sharp hairs containing a poison that produces a stinging sensation. Urtica gracitis is common in the Northern, and U. cham[ae]dryoides in the Southern, United States. the common European species, U. urens and U. dioica, are also found in the Eastern united States. U. pilulifera is the Roman nettle of England. Note: The term nettle has been given to many plants related to, or to some way resembling, the true nettle; as: Australian nettle, a stinging tree or shrub of the genus Laportea (as L. gigas and L. moroides); -- also called nettle tree. Bee nettle, Hemp nettle, a species of Galeopsis. See under Hemp. Blind nettle, Dead nettle, a harmless species of Lamium. False nettle (B[ae]hmeria cylindrica), a plant common in the United States, and related to the true nettles. Hedge nettle, a species of Stachys. See under Hedge. Horse nettle (Solanum Carolinense). See under Horse. nettle tree. (a) Same as Hackberry. (b) See Australian nettle (above). Spurge nettle, a stinging American herb of the Spurge family (Jatropha urens). Wood nettle, a plant (Laportea Canadensis) which stings severely, and is related to the true nettles. Nettle cloth, a kind of thick cotton stuff, japanned, and used as a substitute for leather for various purposes. Nettle rash (Med.), an eruptive disease resembling the effects of whipping with nettles. Sea nettle (Zo["o]l.), a medusa.
Mustela Canadensis
Fisher Fish"er, n. [AS. fiscere.] 1. One who fishes. 2. (Zo["o]l.) A carnivorous animal of the Weasel family (Mustela Canadensis); the pekan; the ``black cat.'
Pedicularis Canadensis
Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; -- frequently used in the plural. Light thickens, and the crow Makes wing to the rooky wood. --Shak. 2. The substance of trees and the like; the hard fibrous substance which composes the body of a tree and its branches, and which is covered by the bark; timber. ``To worship their own work in wood and stone for gods.' --Milton. 3. (Bot.) The fibrous material which makes up the greater part of the stems and branches of trees and shrubby plants, and is found to a less extent in herbaceous stems. It consists of elongated tubular or needle-shaped cells of various kinds, usually interwoven with the shinning bands called silver grain. Note: Wood consists chiefly of the carbohydrates cellulose and lignin, which are isomeric with starch. 4. Trees cut or sawed for the fire or other uses. Wood acid, Wood vinegar (Chem.), a complex acid liquid obtained in the dry distillation of wood, and containing large quantities of acetic acid; hence, specifically, acetic acid. Formerly called pyroligneous acid. Wood anemone (Bot.), a delicate flower (Anemone nemorosa) of early spring; -- also called windflower. See Illust. of Anemone. Wood ant (Zo["o]l.), a large ant (Formica rufa) which lives in woods and forests, and constructs large nests. Wood apple (Bot.). See Elephant apple, under Elephant. Wood baboon (Zo["o]l.), the drill. Wood betony. (Bot.) (a) Same as Betony. (b) The common American lousewort (Pedicularis Canadensis), a low perennial herb with yellowish or purplish flowers. Wood borer. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The larva of any one of numerous species of boring beetles, esp. elaters, longicorn beetles, buprestidans, and certain weevils. See Apple borer, under Apple, and Pine weevil, under Pine. (b) The larva of any one of various species of lepidopterous insects, especially of the clearwing moths, as the peach-tree borer (see under Peach), and of the goat moths. (c) The larva of various species of hymenopterous of the tribe Urocerata. See Tremex. (d) Any one of several bivalve shells which bore in wood, as the teredos, and species of Xylophaga. (e) Any one of several species of small Crustacea, as the Limnoria, and the boring amphipod (Chelura terebrans). Wood carpet, a kind of floor covering made of thin pieces of wood secured to a flexible backing, as of cloth. --Knight. Wood cell (Bot.), a slender cylindrical or prismatic cell usually tapering to a point at both ends. It is the principal constituent of woody fiber. Wood choir, the choir, or chorus, of birds in the woods. [Poetic] --Coleridge. Wood coal, charcoal; also, lignite, or brown coal. Wood cricket (Zo["o]l.), a small European cricket (Nemobius sylvestris). Wood culver (Zo["o]l.), the wood pigeon. Wood cut, an engraving on wood; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood dove (Zo["o]l.), the stockdove. Wood drink, a decoction or infusion of medicinal woods. Wood duck (Zo["o]l.) (a) A very beautiful American duck (Aix sponsa). The male has a large crest, and its plumage is varied with green, purple, black, white, and red. It builds its nest in trees, whence the name. Called also bridal duck, summer duck, and wood widgeon. (b) The hooded merganser. (c) The Australian maned goose (Chlamydochen jubata). Wood echo, an echo from the wood. Wood engraver. (a) An engraver on wood. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any of several species of small beetles whose larv[ae] bore beneath the bark of trees, and excavate furrows in the wood often more or less resembling coarse engravings; especially, Xyleborus xylographus. Wood engraving. (a) The act or art engraving on wood; xylography. (b) An engraving on wood; a wood cut; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood fern. (Bot.) See Shield fern, under Shield. Wood fiber. (a) (Bot.) Fibrovascular tissue. (b) Wood comminuted, and reduced to a powdery or dusty mass. Wood fretter (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of beetles whose larv[ae] bore in the wood, or beneath the bark, of trees. Wood frog (Zo["o]l.), a common North American frog (Rana sylvatica) which lives chiefly in the woods, except during the breeding season. It is drab or yellowish brown, with a black stripe on each side of the head. Wood germander. (Bot.) See under Germander. Wood god, a fabled sylvan deity. Wood grass. (Bot.) See under Grass. Wood grouse. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The capercailzie. (b) The spruce partridge. See under Spruce. Wood guest (Zo["o]l.), the ringdove. [Prov. Eng.] Wood hen. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of Old World short-winged rails of the genus Ocydromus, including the weka and allied species. (b) The American woodcock. Wood hoopoe (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World arboreal birds belonging to Irrisor and allied genera. They are closely allied to the common hoopoe, but have a curved beak, and a longer tail. Wood ibis (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of large, long-legged, wading birds belonging to the genus Tantalus. The head and neck are naked or scantily covered with feathers. The American wood ibis (Tantalus loculator) is common in Florida. Wood lark (Zo["o]l.), a small European lark (Alauda arborea), which, like, the skylark, utters its notes while on the wing. So called from its habit of perching on trees. Wood laurel (Bot.), a European evergreen shrub (Daphne Laureola). Wood leopard (Zo["o]l.), a European spotted moth (Zeuzera [ae]sculi) allied to the goat moth. Its large fleshy larva bores in the wood of the apple, pear, and other fruit trees. Wood lily (Bot.), the lily of the valley. Wood lock (Naut.), a piece of wood close fitted and sheathed with copper, in the throating or score of the pintle, to keep the rudder from rising. Wood louse (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial isopod Crustacea belonging to Oniscus, Armadillo, and related genera. See Sow bug, under Sow, and Pill bug, under Pill. (b) Any one of several species of small, wingless, pseudoneuropterous insects of the family Psocid[ae], which live in the crevices of walls and among old books and papers. Some of the species are called also book lice, and deathticks, or deathwatches. Wood mite (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous small mites of the family Oribatid[ae]. They are found chiefly in woods, on tree trunks and stones. Wood mote. (Eng. Law) (a) Formerly, the forest court. (b) The court of attachment. Wood nettle. (Bot.) See under Nettle. Wood nightshade (Bot.), woody nightshade. Wood nut (Bot.), the filbert. Wood nymph. (a) A nymph inhabiting the woods; a fabled goddess of the woods; a dryad. ``The wood nymphs, decked with daisies trim.' --Milton. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored moths belonging to the genus Eudryas. The larv[ae] are bright-colored, and some of the species, as Eudryas grata, and E. unio, feed on the leaves of the grapevine. (c) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored South American humming birds belonging to the genus Thalurania. The males are bright blue, or green and blue. Wood offering, wood burnt on the altar. We cast the lots . . . for the wood offering. --Neh. x. 34. Wood oil (Bot.), a resinous oil obtained from several East Indian trees of the genus Dipterocarpus, having properties similar to those of copaiba, and sometimes substituted for it. It is also used for mixing paint. See Gurjun. Wood opal (Min.), a striped variety of coarse opal, having some resemblance to wood. Wood paper, paper made of wood pulp. See Wood pulp, below. Wood pewee (Zo["o]l.), a North American tyrant flycatcher (Contopus virens). It closely resembles the pewee, but is smaller. Wood pie (Zo["o]l.), any black and white woodpecker, especially the European great spotted woodpecker. Wood pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of Old World pigeons belonging to Palumbus and allied genera of the family Columbid[ae]. (b) The ringdove. Wood puceron (Zo["o]l.), a plant louse. Wood pulp (Technol.), vegetable fiber obtained from the poplar and other white woods, and so softened by digestion with a hot solution of alkali that it can be formed into sheet paper, etc. It is now produced on an immense scale. Wood quail (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of East Indian crested quails belonging to Rollulus and allied genera, as the red-crested wood quail (R. roulroul), the male of which is bright green, with a long crest of red hairlike feathers. Wood rabbit (Zo["o]l.), the cottontail. Wood rat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of American wild rats of the genus Neotoma found in the Southern United States; -- called also bush rat. The Florida wood rat (Neotoma Floridana) is the best-known species. Wood reed grass (Bot.), a tall grass (Cinna arundinacea) growing in moist woods. Wood reeve, the steward or overseer of a wood. [Eng.] Wood rush (Bot.), any plant of the genus Luzula, differing from the true rushes of the genus Juncus chiefly in having very few seeds in each capsule. Wood sage (Bot.), a name given to several labiate plants of the genus Teucrium. See Germander. Wood screw, a metal screw formed with a sharp thread, and usually with a slotted head, for insertion in wood. Wood sheldrake (Zo["o]l.), the hooded merganser. Wood shock (Zo["o]l.), the fisher. See Fisher, 2. Wood shrike (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World singing birds belonging to Grallina, Collyricincla, Prionops, and allied genera, common in India and Australia. They are allied to the true shrikes, but feed upon both insects and berries. Wood snipe. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The American woodcock. (b) An Asiatic snipe (Gallinago nemoricola). Wood soot, soot from burnt wood. Wood sore. (Zo["o]l.) See Cuckoo spit, under Cuckoo. Wood sorrel (Bot.), a plant of the genus Oxalis (Oxalis Acetosella), having an acid taste. See Illust. (a) of Shamrock. Wood spirit. (Chem.) See Methyl alcohol, under Methyl. Wood stamp, a carved or engraved block or stamp of wood, for impressing figures or colors on fabrics. Wood star (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small South American humming birds belonging to the genus Calothorax. The male has a brilliant gorget of blue, purple, and other colors. Wood sucker (Zo["o]l.), the yaffle. Wood swallow (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World passerine birds belonging to the genus Artamus and allied genera of the family Artamid[ae]. They are common in the East Indies, Asia, and Australia. In form and habits they resemble swallows, but in structure they resemble shrikes. They are usually black above and white beneath. Wood tapper (Zo["o]l.), any woodpecker. Wood tar. See under Tar. Wood thrush, (Zo["o]l.) (a) An American thrush (Turdus mustelinus) noted for the sweetness of its song. See under Thrush. (b) The missel thrush. Wood tick. See in Vocabulary. Wood tin. (Min.). See Cassiterite. Wood titmouse (Zo["o]l.), the goldcgest. Wood tortoise (Zo["o]l.), the sculptured tortoise. See under Sculptured. Wood vine (Bot.), the white bryony. Wood vinegar. See Wood acid, above. Wood warbler. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of American warblers of the genus Dendroica. See Warbler. (b) A European warbler (Phylloscopus sibilatrix); -- called also green wren, wood wren, and yellow wren. Wood worm (Zo["o]l.), a larva that bores in wood; a wood borer. Wood wren. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The wood warbler. (b) The willow warbler.
Perisoreus Canadensis
Jay Jay, n. [F. geai, OF. gai, jaj, perh. fr. OHG. g[=a]hi. Cf. Gay.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of the numerous species of birds belonging to Garrulus, Cyanocitta, and allied genera. They are allied to the crows, but are smaller, more graceful in form, often handsomely colored, and usually have a crest. Note: The European jay (Garrulus glandarius) is a large and handsomely colored species, having the body pale reddish brown, lighter beneath; tail and wing quills blackish; the primary coverts barred with bright blue and black; throat, tail coverts, and a large spot on the wings, white. Called also jay pie, Jenny jay, and k[ae]. The common blue jay (Cyanocitta cristata.), and the related species, are brilliantly colored, and have a large erectile crest. The California jay (Aphelocoma Californica), the Florida jay (A. Floridana), and the green jay (Xanthoura luxuosa), of Texas and Mexico, are large, handsome, crested species. The Canada jay (Perisoreus Canadensis), and several allied species, are much plainer and have no crest. See Blue jay, and Whisky jack. Jay thrush (Zo["o]l.), any one several species of Asiatic singing birds, of the genera Garrulax, Grammatoptila, and related genera of the family Crateropodid[ae]; as, the white-throated jay thrush (G. albogularis), of India.
Perisoreus Canadensis
Whisky Whis"ky, Whiskey Whis"key, n. [Ir. or Gael. uisge water (perhaps akin to E. wash, water) in uisgebeatha whiskey, properly, water of life. Cf. Usquebaugh.] An intoxicating liquor distilled from grain, potatoes, etc., especially in Scotland, Ireland, and the United States. In the United States, whisky is generally distilled from maize, rye, or wheat, but in Scotland and Ireland it is often made from malted barley. Bourbon whisky, corn whisky made in Bourbon County, Kentucky. Crooked whisky. See under Crooked. Whisky Jack (Zo["o]l.), the Canada jay (Perisoreus Canadensis). It is noted for its fearless and familiar habits when it frequents the camps of lumbermen in the winter season. Its color is dull grayish blue, lighter beneath. Called also moose bird.
Poterium Canadensis
Burnet Bur"net, n. [OE. burnet burnet; also, brownish (the plant perh. being named from its color), fr. F. brunet, dim. of brun brown; cf. OF. brunete a sort of flower. See Brunette.] (Bot.) A genus of perennial herbs (Poterium); especially, P.Sanguisorba, the common, or garden, burnet. Burnet moth (Zo["o]l.), in England, a handsome moth (Zyg[ae]na filipendula), with crimson spots on the wings. Burnet saxifrage. (Bot.) See Saxifrage. Canadian burnet, a marsh plant (Poterium Canadensis). Great burnet, Wild burnet, Poterium (or Sanguisorba) oficinalis.
R canadensis
Dewberry Dew"ber`ry, n. (Bot.) (a) The fruit of certain species of bramble (Rubus); in England, the fruit of R. c[ae]sius, which has a glaucous bloom; in America, that of R. canadensis and R. hispidus, species of low blackberries. (b) The plant which bears the fruit. Feed him with apricots and dewberries. --Shak.

Meaning of Canadensis from wikipedia

- canadensis, common names American beaver, Canadian beaver, and North American beaver Cervus canadensis, common name elk or wapiti Lontra canadensis,...
- years ago). Thus, the three subspecies of O. canadensis are: Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (O. c. canadensis) – occupying the U.S. and Canadian Rocky Mountains...
- The Canada goose (Branta canadensis) is a large wild goose species with a black head and neck, white ch****s, white under its chin, and a brown body. Native...
- Roosevelt (C. canadensis roosevelti), Tule (C. canadensis nannodes), Manitoban (C. canadensis manitobensis) and Rocky Mountain (C. canadensis nelsoni). The...
- the nominotypical subspecies, the lesser sandhill crane (Antigone canadensis canadensis), with up to 450,000 of these birds migrating through annually....
- before 2017: L. c. canadensis Kerr, 1792 L. c. mollipilosus (Alaskan lynx) Stone, 1900: Considered a synonym of L. c. canadensis by Tumlison. L. c. subsol****...
- name was Lutra canadensis. The species epithet canadensis means "of Canada". In a new cl****ification, the species is called Lontra canadensis, where the genus...
- Plant Selector Cercis canadensis 'Forest Pansy'". Apps.rhs.org.uk. Retrieved 2013-06-13. "RHS Plantfinder - Cercis canadensis 'Ruby Falls'". Royal Horticultural...
- The North American beaver (Castor canadensis) is one of two extant beaver species. It is native to North America and introduced to Patagonia in South America...
- Tsuga canadensis, also known as eastern hemlock, eastern hemlock-spruce or Canadian hemlock, and in the French-speaking regions of Canada as pruche du...
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