Definition of Ammonia. Meaning of Ammonia. Synonyms of Ammonia

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Definition of Ammonia

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Aldehyde ammonia
Aldehyde ammonia (Chem.), a compound formed by the union of aldehyde with ammonia.
Ammoniac
Ammoniac Am*mo"ni*ac, Ammoniacal Am`mo*ni"a*cal, a. Of or pertaining to ammonia, or possessing its properties; as, an ammoniac salt; ammoniacal gas. Ammoniacal engine, an engine in which the vapor of ammonia is used as the motive force. Sal ammoniac [L. sal ammoniacus], the salt usually called chloride of ammonium, and formerly muriate of ammonia.
Ammoniac
Ammoniac Am*mo"ni*ac(or Gum ammoniac Gum` am*mo"ni*ac, n. [L. Ammoniacum, Gr. ? a resinous gum, said to distill from a tree near the temple of Jupiter Ammon; cf. F. ammoniac. See Ammonite.] (Med.) The concrete juice (gum resin) of an umbelliferous plant, the Dorema ammoniacum. It is brought chiefly from Persia in the form of yellowish tears, which occur singly, or are aggregated into masses. It has a peculiar smell, and a nauseous, sweet taste, followed by a bitter one. It is inflammable, partially soluble in water and in spirit of wine, and is used in medicine as an expectorant and resolvent, and for the formation of certain plasters.
Ammoniacal
Ammoniac Am*mo"ni*ac, Ammoniacal Am`mo*ni"a*cal, a. Of or pertaining to ammonia, or possessing its properties; as, an ammoniac salt; ammoniacal gas. Ammoniacal engine, an engine in which the vapor of ammonia is used as the motive force. Sal ammoniac [L. sal ammoniacus], the salt usually called chloride of ammonium, and formerly muriate of ammonia.
Ammoniacal engine
Ammoniac Am*mo"ni*ac, Ammoniacal Am`mo*ni"a*cal, a. Of or pertaining to ammonia, or possessing its properties; as, an ammoniac salt; ammoniacal gas. Ammoniacal engine, an engine in which the vapor of ammonia is used as the motive force. Sal ammoniac [L. sal ammoniacus], the salt usually called chloride of ammonium, and formerly muriate of ammonia.
Ammoniacal fermentation
Ammoniacal fermentation Am`mo*ni"a*cal fer`men*ta"tion Any fermentation process by which ammonia is formed, as that by which urea is converted into ammonium carbonate when urine is exposed to the air.
Ammoniacal fermentation
2. A state of agitation or excitement, as of the intellect or the feelings. It puts the soul to fermentation and activity. --Jer. Taylor. A univesal fermentation of human thought and faith. --C. Kingsley. Acetous, or Acetic, fermentation, a form of oxidation in which alcohol is converted into vinegar or acetic acid by the agency of a specific fungus or ferment (Mycoderma aceti). The process involves two distinct reactions, in which the oxygen of the air is essential. An intermediate product, aldehyde, is formed in the first process. 1. C2H6O + O = H2O + C2H4O Note: Alcohol. Water. Aldehyde. 2. C2H4O + O = C2H4O2 Note: Aldehyde. Acetic acid. Alcoholic fermentation, the fermentation which saccharine bodies undergo when brought in contact with the yeast plant or Torula. The sugar is converted, either directly or indirectly, into alcohol and carbonic acid, the rate of action being dependent on the rapidity with which the Torul[ae] develop. Ammoniacal fermentation, the conversion of the urea of the urine into ammonium carbonate, through the growth of the special urea ferment. CON2H4 + 2H2O = (NH4)2CO3 Note: Urea. Water. Ammonium carbonate. Note: Whenever urine is exposed to the air in open vessels for several days it undergoes this alkaline fermentation. Butyric fermentation, the decomposition of various forms of organic matter, through the agency of a peculiar worm-shaped vibrio, with formation of more or less butyric acid. It is one of the many forms of fermentation that collectively constitute putrefaction. See Lactic fermentation. Fermentation by an unorganized ferment or enzyme. Fermentations of this class are purely chemical reactions, in which the ferment acts as a simple catalytic agent. Of this nature are the decomposition or inversion of cane sugar into levulose and dextrose by boiling with dilute acids, the conversion of starch into dextrin and sugar by similar treatment, the conversion of starch into like products by the action of diastase of malt or ptyalin of saliva, the conversion of albuminous food into peptones and other like products by the action of pepsin-hydrochloric acid of the gastric juice or by the ferment of the pancreatic juice. Fermentation theory of disease (Biol. & Med.), the theory that most if not all, infectious or zymotic disease are caused by the introduction into the organism of the living germs of ferments, or ferments already developed (organized ferments), by which processes of fermentation are set up injurious to health. See Germ theory. Glycerin fermentation, the fermentation which occurs on mixing a dilute solution of glycerin with a peculiar species of schizomycetes and some carbonate of lime, and other matter favorable to the growth of the plant, the glycerin being changed into butyric acid, caproic acid, butyl, and ethyl alcohol. With another form of bacterium (Bacillus subtilis) ethyl alcohol and butyric acid are mainly formed. Lactic fermentation, the transformation of milk sugar or other saccharine body into lactic acid, as in the souring of milk, through the agency of a special bacterium (Bacterium lactis of Lister). In this change the milk sugar, before assuming the form of lactic acid, presumably passes through the stage of glucose. C12H22O11.H2O = 4C3H6O3 Note: Hydrated milk sugar. Lactic acid. Note: In the lactic fermentation of dextrose or glucose, the lactic acid which is formed is very prone to undergo butyric fermentation after the manner indicated in the following equation: 2C3H6O3 (lactic acid) = C4H8O2 (butyric acid) + 2CO2 (carbonic acid) + 2H2 (hydrogen gas). Putrefactive fermentation. See Putrefaction.
ammoniacal water
Gas fitter, one who lays pipes and puts up fixtures for gas. Gas fitting. (a) The occupation of a gas fitter. (b) pl. The appliances needed for the introduction of gas into a building, as meters, pipes, burners, etc. Gas fixture, a device for conveying illuminating or combustible gas from the pipe to the gas-burner, consisting of an appendage of cast, wrought, or drawn metal, with tubes upon which the burners, keys, etc., are adjusted. Gas generator, an apparatus in which gas is evolved; as: (a) a retort in which volatile hydrocarbons are evolved by heat; (b) a machine in which air is saturated with the vapor of liquid hydrocarbon; a carburetor; (c) a machine for the production of carbonic acid gas, for a["e]rating water, bread, etc. --Knight. Gas jet, a flame of illuminating gas. Gas machine, an apparatus for carbureting air for use as illuminating gas. Gas meter, an instrument for recording the quantity of gas consumed in a given time, at a particular place. Gas retort, a retort which contains the coal and other materials, and in which the gas is generated, in the manufacture of gas. Gas stove, a stove for cooking or other purposes, heated by gas. Gas tar, coal tar. Gas trap, a drain trap; a sewer trap. See 4th Trap, 5. Gas washer (Gas Works), an apparatus within which gas from the condenser is brought in contact with a falling stream of water, to precipitate the tar remaining in it. --Knight. Gas water, water through which gas has been passed for purification; -- called also gas liquor and ammoniacal water, and used for the manufacture of sal ammoniac, carbonate of ammonia, and Prussian blue. --Tomlinson. Gas well, a deep boring, from which natural gas is discharged. --Raymond. Gas works, a manufactory of gas, with all the machinery and appurtenances; a place where gas is generated for lighting cities. Laughing gas. See under Laughing. Marsh gas (Chem.), a light, combustible, gaseous hydrocarbon, CH4, produced artificially by the dry distillation of many organic substances, and occurring as a natural product of decomposition in stagnant pools, whence its name. It is an abundant ingredient of ordinary illuminating gas, and is the first member of the paraffin series. Called also methane, and in coal mines, fire damp. Natural gas, gas obtained from wells, etc., in Pennsylvania, Ohio, and elsewhere, and largely used for fuel and illuminating purposes. It is chiefly derived from the Coal Measures. Olefiant gas (Chem.). See Ethylene. Water gas (Chem.), a kind of gas made by forcing steam over glowing coals, whereby there results a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. This gives a gas of intense heating power, but destitute of light-giving properties, and which is charged by passing through some volatile hydrocarbon, as gasoline.
Ammoniated
Ammoniated Am*mo"ni*a`ted, a. (Chem.) Combined or impregnated with ammonia.
aqua ammonia
Aqua A"qua, n. [L. See Ewer.] Water; -- a word much used in pharmacy and the old chemistry, in various signification, determined by the word or words annexed. Aqua ammoni[ae], the aqueous solution of ammonia; liquid ammonia; often called aqua ammonia. Aqua marine, or Aqua marina. Same as Aquamarine. Aqua regia. [L., royal water] (Chem.), a very corrosive fuming yellow liquid consisting of nitric and hydrochloric acids. It has the power of dissolving gold, the ``royal' metal. Aqua Tofana, a fluid containing arsenic, and used for secret poisoning, made by an Italian woman named Tofana, in the middle of the 17th century, who is said to have poisoned more than 600 persons. --Francis. Aqua vit[ae][L., water of life. Cf. Eau de vie, Usquebaugh], a name given to brandy and some other ardent spirits. --Shak.
Aqua ammoniae
Aqua A"qua, n. [L. See Ewer.] Water; -- a word much used in pharmacy and the old chemistry, in various signification, determined by the word or words annexed. Aqua ammoni[ae], the aqueous solution of ammonia; liquid ammonia; often called aqua ammonia. Aqua marine, or Aqua marina. Same as Aquamarine. Aqua regia. [L., royal water] (Chem.), a very corrosive fuming yellow liquid consisting of nitric and hydrochloric acids. It has the power of dissolving gold, the ``royal' metal. Aqua Tofana, a fluid containing arsenic, and used for secret poisoning, made by an Italian woman named Tofana, in the middle of the 17th century, who is said to have poisoned more than 600 persons. --Francis. Aqua vit[ae][L., water of life. Cf. Eau de vie, Usquebaugh], a name given to brandy and some other ardent spirits. --Shak.
Dorema ammoniacum
Ammoniac Am*mo"ni*ac(or Gum ammoniac Gum` am*mo"ni*ac, n. [L. Ammoniacum, Gr. ? a resinous gum, said to distill from a tree near the temple of Jupiter Ammon; cf. F. ammoniac. See Ammonite.] (Med.) The concrete juice (gum resin) of an umbelliferous plant, the Dorema ammoniacum. It is brought chiefly from Persia in the form of yellowish tears, which occur singly, or are aggregated into masses. It has a peculiar smell, and a nauseous, sweet taste, followed by a bitter one. It is inflammable, partially soluble in water and in spirit of wine, and is used in medicine as an expectorant and resolvent, and for the formation of certain plasters.
Gum ammoniac
Ammoniac Am*mo"ni*ac(or Gum ammoniac Gum` am*mo"ni*ac, n. [L. Ammoniacum, Gr. ? a resinous gum, said to distill from a tree near the temple of Jupiter Ammon; cf. F. ammoniac. See Ammonite.] (Med.) The concrete juice (gum resin) of an umbelliferous plant, the Dorema ammoniacum. It is brought chiefly from Persia in the form of yellowish tears, which occur singly, or are aggregated into masses. It has a peculiar smell, and a nauseous, sweet taste, followed by a bitter one. It is inflammable, partially soluble in water and in spirit of wine, and is used in medicine as an expectorant and resolvent, and for the formation of certain plasters.
muriate of ammonia
Ammoniac Am*mo"ni*ac, Ammoniacal Am`mo*ni"a*cal, a. Of or pertaining to ammonia, or possessing its properties; as, an ammoniac salt; ammoniacal gas. Ammoniacal engine, an engine in which the vapor of ammonia is used as the motive force. Sal ammoniac [L. sal ammoniacus], the salt usually called chloride of ammonium, and formerly muriate of ammonia.
Oxyammonia
Oxyammonia Ox`y*am*mo"ni*a, n. [Oxy (b) + ammonia.] (Chem.) Same as Hydroxylamine.
Sal ammoniac
Ammoniac Am*mo"ni*ac, Ammoniacal Am`mo*ni"a*cal, a. Of or pertaining to ammonia, or possessing its properties; as, an ammoniac salt; ammoniacal gas. Ammoniacal engine, an engine in which the vapor of ammonia is used as the motive force. Sal ammoniac [L. sal ammoniacus], the salt usually called chloride of ammonium, and formerly muriate of ammonia.
Scammoniate
Scammoniate Scam*mo"ni*ate, a. Made from scammony; as, a scammoniate aperient.

Meaning of Ammonia from wikipedia

- Ammonia is a compound of nitrogen and hydrogen with the formula NH3. A stable binary hydride, and the simplest pnictogen hydride, ammonia is a colourless...
- also known as ammonia water, ammonia solution, ammoniacal liquor, ammonia liquor, aqua ammonia, aqueous ammonia, or (inaccurately) ammonia, is a solution...
- Ammonia is one of the most highly produced inorganic chemicals. There are numerous large-scale ammonia production plants worldwide, producing a total of...
- Ammonia poisoning is a common fish disease in new aquariums, especially when immediately stocked to full capacity. Ideally, the level of ammonia (NH3)...
- Ammonia Avenue is the seventh studio album by the British progressive rock band The Alan Parsons Project, released on 7 December 1983 by Arista Records...
- Smelling salts, also known as ammonia inhalants, spirit of hartshorn or sal volatile, are chemical compounds often used to arouse consciousness. The usual...
- years of the twentieth century, the vapor absorption cycle using water-ammonia systems was po****r and widely used, but after the development of the vapor...
- fixation process and is the main industrial procedure for the production of ammonia today. It is named after its inventors, the German chemists Fritz Haber...
- Ammonia monooxygenase (EC 1.14.99.39, AMO) is an enzyme, which catalyses the following chemical reaction ammonia + AH2 + O2 ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons...
- energy by the oxidation of inorganic nitrogen compounds. Types include ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) and nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB). Many species...
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