Definition of tin. Meaning of tin. Synonyms of tin

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Definition of tin

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Alkanna tinctoria
Alkanet Al"ka*net, n. [Dim. of Sp. alcana, alhe[~n]a, in which al is the Ar. article. See Henna, and cf. Orchanet.] 1. (Chem.) A dyeing matter extracted from the roots of Alkanna tinctoria, which gives a fine deep red color. 2. (Bot.) (a) A boraginaceous herb (Alkanna tinctoria) yielding the dye; orchanet. (b) The similar plant Anchusa officinalis; bugloss; also, the American puccoon.
Alkanna tinctoria
Alkanet Al"ka*net, n. [Dim. of Sp. alcana, alhe[~n]a, in which al is the Ar. article. See Henna, and cf. Orchanet.] 1. (Chem.) A dyeing matter extracted from the roots of Alkanna tinctoria, which gives a fine deep red color. 2. (Bot.) (a) A boraginaceous herb (Alkanna tinctoria) yielding the dye; orchanet. (b) The similar plant Anchusa officinalis; bugloss; also, the American puccoon.
Baptisia tinctoria
2. (Chem.) A blue dyestuff obtained from several plants belonging to very different genera and orders; as, the woad, Isatis tinctoria, Indigofera tinctoria, I. Anil, Nereum tinctorium, etc. It is a dark blue earthy substance, tasteless and odorless, with a copper-violet luster when rubbed. Indigo does not exist in the plants as such, but is obtained by decomposition of the glycoside indican. Note: Commercial indigo contains the essential coloring principle indigo blue or indigotine, with several other dyes; as, indigo red, indigo brown, etc., and various impurities. Indigo is insoluble in ordinary reagents, with the exception of strong sulphuric acid. Chinese indigo (Bot.), Isatis indigotica, a kind of woad. Wild indigo (Bot.), the American herb Baptisia tinctoria which yields a poor quality of indigo, as do several other species of the same genus.
bar tin
Tin Tin, n. [As. tin; akin to D. tin, G. zinn, OHG. zin, Icel. & Dan. tin, Sw. tenn; of unknown origin.] 1. (Chem.) An elementary substance found as an oxide in the mineral cassiterite, and reduced as a soft white crystalline metal, malleable at ordinary temperatures, but brittle when heated. It is not easily oxidized in the air, and is used chiefly to coat iron to protect it from rusting, in the form of tin foil with mercury to form the reflective surface of mirrors, and in solder, bronze, speculum metal, and other alloys. Its compounds are designated as stannous, or stannic. Symbol Sn (Stannum). Atomic weight 117.4. 2. Thin plates of iron covered with tin; tin plate. 3. Money. [Cant] --Beaconsfield. Block tin (Metal.), commercial tin, cast into blocks, and partially refined, but containing small quantities of various impurities, as copper, lead, iron, arsenic, etc.; solid tin as distinguished from tin plate; -- called also bar tin. Butter of tin. (Old Chem.) See Fuming liquor of Libavius, under Fuming. Grain tin. (Metal.) See under Grain. Salt of tin (Dyeing), stannous chloride, especially so called when used as a mordant. Stream tin. See under Stream. Tin cry (Chem.), the peculiar creaking noise made when a bar of tin is bent. It is produced by the grating of the crystal granules on each other. Tin foil, tin reduced to a thin leaf. Tin frame (Mining), a kind of buddle used in washing tin ore. Tin liquor, Tin mordant (Dyeing), stannous chloride, used as a mordant in dyeing and calico printing. Tin penny, a customary duty in England, formerly paid to tithingmen for liberty to dig in tin mines. [Obs.] --Bailey. Tin plate, thin sheet iron coated with tin. Tin pyrites. See Stannite.
Block tin
Tin Tin, n. [As. tin; akin to D. tin, G. zinn, OHG. zin, Icel. & Dan. tin, Sw. tenn; of unknown origin.] 1. (Chem.) An elementary substance found as an oxide in the mineral cassiterite, and reduced as a soft white crystalline metal, malleable at ordinary temperatures, but brittle when heated. It is not easily oxidized in the air, and is used chiefly to coat iron to protect it from rusting, in the form of tin foil with mercury to form the reflective surface of mirrors, and in solder, bronze, speculum metal, and other alloys. Its compounds are designated as stannous, or stannic. Symbol Sn (Stannum). Atomic weight 117.4. 2. Thin plates of iron covered with tin; tin plate. 3. Money. [Cant] --Beaconsfield. Block tin (Metal.), commercial tin, cast into blocks, and partially refined, but containing small quantities of various impurities, as copper, lead, iron, arsenic, etc.; solid tin as distinguished from tin plate; -- called also bar tin. Butter of tin. (Old Chem.) See Fuming liquor of Libavius, under Fuming. Grain tin. (Metal.) See under Grain. Salt of tin (Dyeing), stannous chloride, especially so called when used as a mordant. Stream tin. See under Stream. Tin cry (Chem.), the peculiar creaking noise made when a bar of tin is bent. It is produced by the grating of the crystal granules on each other. Tin foil, tin reduced to a thin leaf. Tin frame (Mining), a kind of buddle used in washing tin ore. Tin liquor, Tin mordant (Dyeing), stannous chloride, used as a mordant in dyeing and calico printing. Tin penny, a customary duty in England, formerly paid to tithingmen for liberty to dig in tin mines. [Obs.] --Bailey. Tin plate, thin sheet iron coated with tin. Tin pyrites. See Stannite.
Block tin
Block tin Block" tin` See under Tin.
Bocydium tintinnabuliferum
Bell bearer Bell" bear`er (Zo["o]l.) A Brazilian leaf hopper (Bocydium tintinnabuliferum), remarkable for the four bell-shaped appendages of its thorax.
Butter of tin
Tin Tin, n. [As. tin; akin to D. tin, G. zinn, OHG. zin, Icel. & Dan. tin, Sw. tenn; of unknown origin.] 1. (Chem.) An elementary substance found as an oxide in the mineral cassiterite, and reduced as a soft white crystalline metal, malleable at ordinary temperatures, but brittle when heated. It is not easily oxidized in the air, and is used chiefly to coat iron to protect it from rusting, in the form of tin foil with mercury to form the reflective surface of mirrors, and in solder, bronze, speculum metal, and other alloys. Its compounds are designated as stannous, or stannic. Symbol Sn (Stannum). Atomic weight 117.4. 2. Thin plates of iron covered with tin; tin plate. 3. Money. [Cant] --Beaconsfield. Block tin (Metal.), commercial tin, cast into blocks, and partially refined, but containing small quantities of various impurities, as copper, lead, iron, arsenic, etc.; solid tin as distinguished from tin plate; -- called also bar tin. Butter of tin. (Old Chem.) See Fuming liquor of Libavius, under Fuming. Grain tin. (Metal.) See under Grain. Salt of tin (Dyeing), stannous chloride, especially so called when used as a mordant. Stream tin. See under Stream. Tin cry (Chem.), the peculiar creaking noise made when a bar of tin is bent. It is produced by the grating of the crystal granules on each other. Tin foil, tin reduced to a thin leaf. Tin frame (Mining), a kind of buddle used in washing tin ore. Tin liquor, Tin mordant (Dyeing), stannous chloride, used as a mordant in dyeing and calico printing. Tin penny, a customary duty in England, formerly paid to tithingmen for liberty to dig in tin mines. [Obs.] --Bailey. Tin plate, thin sheet iron coated with tin. Tin pyrites. See Stannite.
C tinctoria
Coreopsis Co`re*op"sis (k?`r?-?p"s?s), n. [NL., fr. Gr. ???? bug + ??? appearance.] (Bot.) A genus of herbaceous composite plants, having the achenes two-horned and remotely resembling some insect; tickseed. C. tinctoria, of the Western plains, the commonest plant of the genus, has been used in dyeing.
Carthamus tinctorius
Safflower Saf"flow`er, n. [F. safleur, saflor, for safran, influenced by fleur flower. See Saffron, and Flower.] 1. (Bot.) An annual composite plant (Carthamus tinctorius), the flowers of which are used as a dyestuff and in making rouge; bastard, or false, saffron. 2. The dried flowers of the Carthamus tinctorius. 3. A dyestuff from these flowers. See Safranin (b) . Oil of safflower, a purgative oil expressed from the seeds of the safflower.
Carthamus tinctorius
Safflower Saf"flow`er, n. [F. safleur, saflor, for safran, influenced by fleur flower. See Saffron, and Flower.] 1. (Bot.) An annual composite plant (Carthamus tinctorius), the flowers of which are used as a dyestuff and in making rouge; bastard, or false, saffron. 2. The dried flowers of the Carthamus tinctorius. 3. A dyestuff from these flowers. See Safranin (b) . Oil of safflower, a purgative oil expressed from the seeds of the safflower.
Carthamus tinctorius
Carthamin Car"tha*min, n. (Chem.) A red coloring matter obtained from the safflower, or Carthamus tinctorius.
Chrozophora tinctoria
Turnsole Turn"sole`, n. [F. tournesol, It. tornasole; tornare to turn (LL. tornare) + sole the sun, L. sol. See Turn, Solar, a., and cf. Heliotrope.] [Written also turnsol.] 1. (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Heliotropium; heliotrope; -- so named because its flowers are supposed to turn toward the sun. (b) The sunflower. (c) A kind of spurge (Euphorbia Helioscopia). (d) The euphorbiaceous plant Chrozophora tinctoria. 2. (Chem.) (a) Litmus. [Obs.] (b) A purple dye obtained from the plant turnsole. See def. 1 (d) .
Cladrastis tinctoria
Yellowwood Yel"low*wood`, n. (Bot.) The wood of any one of several different kinds of trees; also, any one of the trees themselves. Among the trees so called are the Cladrastis tinctoria, an American leguminous tree; the several species of prickly ash (Xanthoxylum); the Australian Flindersia Oxleyana, a tree related to the mahogany; certain South African species of Podocarpus, trees related to the yew; the East Indian Podocarpus latifolia; and the true satinwood (Chloroxylon Swietenia). All these Old World trees furnish valuable timber.
Ethereal tincture
Tincture Tinc"ture, n. [L. tinctura a dyeing, from tingere, tinctum, to tinge, dye: cf. OE. tainture, teinture, F. teinture, L. tinctura. See Tinge.] 1. A tinge or shade of color; a tint; as, a tincture of red. 2. (Her.) One of the metals, colors, or furs used in armory. Note: There are two metals: gold, called or, and represented in engraving by a white surface covered with small dots; and silver, called argent, and represented by a plain white surface. The colors and their representations are as follows: red, called gules, or a shading of vertical lines; blue, called azure, or horizontal lines; black, called sable, or horizontal and vertical lines crossing; green, called vert, or diagonal lines from dexter chief corner; purple, called purpure, or diagonal lines from sinister chief corner. The furs are ermine, ermines, erminois, pean, vair, counter vair, potent, and counter potent. See Illustration in Appendix. 3. The finer and more volatile parts of a substance, separated by a solvent; an extract of a part of the substance of a body communicated to the solvent. 4. (Med.) A solution (commonly colored) of medicinal substance in alcohol, usually more or less diluted; spirit containing medicinal substances in solution. Note: According to the United States Pharmacop[oe]ia, the term tincture (also called alcoholic tincture, and spirituous tincture) is reserved for the alcoholic solutions of nonvolatile substances, alcoholic solutions of volatile substances being called spirits. Ethereal tincture, a solution of medicinal substance in ether. 5. A slight taste superadded to any substance; as, a tincture of orange peel. 6. A slight quality added to anything; a tinge; as, a tincture of French manners. All manners take a tincture from our own. --Pope. Every man had a slight tincture of soldiership, and scarcely any man more than a slight tincture. --Macaulay.
German tinder
Tinder Tin"der, n. [OE. tinder, tunder, AS. tynder, tyndre; akin to tendan to kindle, D. tonder tinder, G. zunder, OHG. zuntara, zuntra, Icel. tundr, Sw. tunder, Dan. t["o]nder. See Tind.] Something very inflammable, used for kindling fire from a spark, as scorched linen. German tinder. Same as Amadou. Tinder box, a box in which tinder is kept.
German tinder
German Ger"man, a. [L. Germanus. See German, n.] Of or pertaining to Germany. German Baptists. See Dunker. German bit, a wood-boring tool, having a long elliptical pod and a scew point. German carp (Zo["o]l.), the crucian carp. German millet (Bot.), a kind of millet (Setaria Italica, var.), whose seed is sometimes used for food. German paste, a prepared food for caged birds. German process (Metal.), the process of reducing copper ore in a blast furnace, after roasting, if necessary. --Raymond. German sarsaparilla, a substitute for sarsaparilla extract. German sausage, a polony, or gut stuffed with meat partly cooked. German silver (Chem.), a silver-white alloy, hard and tough, but malleable and ductile, and quite permanent in the air. It contains nickel, copper, and zinc in varying proportions, and was originally made from old copper slag at Henneberg. A small amount of iron is sometimes added to make it whiter and harder. It is essentially identical with the Chinese alloy packfong. It was formerly much used for tableware, knife handles, frames, cases, bearings of machinery, etc., but is now largely superseded by other white alloys. German steel (Metal.), a metal made from bog iron ore in a forge, with charcoal for fuel. German text (Typog.), a character resembling modern German type, used in English printing for ornamental headings, etc., as in the words, Note: This line is German Text. German tinder. See Amadou.
Grain tin
Tin Tin, n. [As. tin; akin to D. tin, G. zinn, OHG. zin, Icel. & Dan. tin, Sw. tenn; of unknown origin.] 1. (Chem.) An elementary substance found as an oxide in the mineral cassiterite, and reduced as a soft white crystalline metal, malleable at ordinary temperatures, but brittle when heated. It is not easily oxidized in the air, and is used chiefly to coat iron to protect it from rusting, in the form of tin foil with mercury to form the reflective surface of mirrors, and in solder, bronze, speculum metal, and other alloys. Its compounds are designated as stannous, or stannic. Symbol Sn (Stannum). Atomic weight 117.4. 2. Thin plates of iron covered with tin; tin plate. 3. Money. [Cant] --Beaconsfield. Block tin (Metal.), commercial tin, cast into blocks, and partially refined, but containing small quantities of various impurities, as copper, lead, iron, arsenic, etc.; solid tin as distinguished from tin plate; -- called also bar tin. Butter of tin. (Old Chem.) See Fuming liquor of Libavius, under Fuming. Grain tin. (Metal.) See under Grain. Salt of tin (Dyeing), stannous chloride, especially so called when used as a mordant. Stream tin. See under Stream. Tin cry (Chem.), the peculiar creaking noise made when a bar of tin is bent. It is produced by the grating of the crystal granules on each other. Tin foil, tin reduced to a thin leaf. Tin frame (Mining), a kind of buddle used in washing tin ore. Tin liquor, Tin mordant (Dyeing), stannous chloride, used as a mordant in dyeing and calico printing. Tin penny, a customary duty in England, formerly paid to tithingmen for liberty to dig in tin mines. [Obs.] --Bailey. Tin plate, thin sheet iron coated with tin. Tin pyrites. See Stannite.
I tinctoria
Indigo In"di*go, a. Having the color of, pertaining to, or derived from, indigo. Indigo berry (Bot.), the fruit of the West Indian shrub Randia aculeata, used as a blue dye. Indigo bird (Zo["o]l.), a small North American finch (Cyanospiza cyanea). The male is indigo blue in color. Called also indigo bunting. Indigo blue. (a) The essential coloring material of commercial indigo, from which it is obtained as a dark blue earthy powder, with a reddish luster, C16H10N2O2, which may be crystallized by sublimation. Indigo blue is also made from artificial amido cinnamic acid, and from artificial isatine; and these methods are of great commercial importance. Called also indigotin. (b) A dark, dull blue color like the indigo of commerce. Indigo brown (Chem.), a brown resinous substance found in crude indigo. Indigo copper (Min.), covellite. Indigo green, a green obtained from indigo. Indigo plant (Bot.), a leguminous plant of several species (genus Indigofera), from which indigo is prepared. The different varieties are natives of Asia, Africa, and America. Several species are cultivated, of which the most important are the I. tinctoria, or common indigo plant, the I. Anil, a larger species, and the I. disperma. Indigo purple, a purple obtained from indigo. Indigo red, a dyestuff, isomeric with indigo blue, obtained from crude indigo as a dark brown amorphous powder. Indigo snake (Zo["o]l.), the gopher snake. Indigo white, a white crystalline powder obtained by reduction from indigo blue, and by oxidation easily changed back to it; -- called also indigogen. Indigo yellow, a substance obtained from indigo.
Indigofera tinctoria
2. (Chem.) A blue dyestuff obtained from several plants belonging to very different genera and orders; as, the woad, Isatis tinctoria, Indigofera tinctoria, I. Anil, Nereum tinctorium, etc. It is a dark blue earthy substance, tasteless and odorless, with a copper-violet luster when rubbed. Indigo does not exist in the plants as such, but is obtained by decomposition of the glycoside indican. Note: Commercial indigo contains the essential coloring principle indigo blue or indigotine, with several other dyes; as, indigo red, indigo brown, etc., and various impurities. Indigo is insoluble in ordinary reagents, with the exception of strong sulphuric acid. Chinese indigo (Bot.), Isatis indigotica, a kind of woad. Wild indigo (Bot.), the American herb Baptisia tinctoria which yields a poor quality of indigo, as do several other species of the same genus.
Indigofera tinctoria
Indigofera In`di*gof"e*ra, n. [NL., from E. indigo + L. ferre to bear.] (Bot.) A genus of leguminous plants having many species, mostly in tropical countries, several of them yielding indigo, esp. Indigofera tinctoria, and I. Anil.
Isatis tinctoria
2. (Chem.) A blue dyestuff obtained from several plants belonging to very different genera and orders; as, the woad, Isatis tinctoria, Indigofera tinctoria, I. Anil, Nereum tinctorium, etc. It is a dark blue earthy substance, tasteless and odorless, with a copper-violet luster when rubbed. Indigo does not exist in the plants as such, but is obtained by decomposition of the glycoside indican. Note: Commercial indigo contains the essential coloring principle indigo blue or indigotine, with several other dyes; as, indigo red, indigo brown, etc., and various impurities. Indigo is insoluble in ordinary reagents, with the exception of strong sulphuric acid. Chinese indigo (Bot.), Isatis indigotica, a kind of woad. Wild indigo (Bot.), the American herb Baptisia tinctoria which yields a poor quality of indigo, as do several other species of the same genus.
Isatis tinctoria
Isatis I"sa*tis (?; 277), n. [L., a kind of plant, Gr. ? woad.] (Bot.) A genus of herbs, some species of which, especially the Isatis tinctoria, yield a blue dye similar to indigo; woad.
Isatis tinctoria
Woad Woad, n. [OE. wod, AS. w[=a]d; akin to D. weede, G. waid, OHG. weit, Dan. vaid, veid, Sw. veide, L. vitrum.] [Written also wad, and wade.] 1. (Bot.) An herbaceous cruciferous plant (Isatis tinctoria). It was formerly cultivated for the blue coloring matter derived from its leaves. 2. A blue dyestuff, or coloring matter, consisting of the powdered and fermented leaves of the Isatis tinctoria. It is now superseded by indigo, but is somewhat used with indigo as a ferment in dyeing. Their bodies . . . painted with woad in sundry figures. --Milton. Wild woad (Bot.), the weld (Reseda luteola). See Weld. Woad mill, a mill grinding and preparing woad.
Isatis tinctoria
Pastel Pas"tel, n. [F.; cf. It. pastello. Cf. Pastil.] 1. A crayon made of a paste composed of a color ground with gum water. [Sometimes incorrectly written pastil.] ``Charming heads in pastel.' --W. Black. 2. (Bot.) A plant affording a blue dye; the woad (Isatis tinctoria); also, the dye itself.
Maclura formerly Morus tinctoria
Morintannic Mo`rin*tan"nic, a. [NL. Morus fustic + E. tannic.] (Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, a variety of tannic acid extracted from fustic (Maclura, formerly Morus, tinctoria) as a yellow crystalline substance; -- called also maclurin.
Maclura tinctoria
Morin Mo"rin, n. (Chem.) A yellow crystalline substance of acid properties extracted from fustic (Maclura tinctoria, formerly called Morus tinctoria); -- called also moric acid.
Maclura tinctoria
Fustic Fus"tic, n. [F. fustoc, Sp. fustoc. Cf. Fustet.] The wood of the Maclura tinctoria, a tree growing in the West Indies, used in dyeing yellow; -- called also old fustic. [Written also fustoc.] Note: Other kinds of yellow wood are often called fustic; as that of species of Xanthoxylum, and especially the Rhus Cotinus, which is sometimes called young fustic to distinguish it from the Maclura. See Fustet.
Marsdenia tinctoria
Marsdenia Mars*de"ni*a, n. [NL. From W. Marsden, an English author.] (Bot.) A genus of plants of the Milkweed family, mostly woody climbers with fragrant flowers, several species of which furnish valuable fiber, and one species (Marsdenia tinctoria) affords indigo.
Metallic tinking
Metallic iron, iron in the state of the metal, as distinquished from its ores, as magnetic iron. Metallic paper, paper covered with a thin solution of lime, whiting, and size. When written upon with a pewter or brass pencil, the lines can hardly be effaced. Metallic tinking (Med.), a sound heard in the chest, when a cavity communicating with the air passages contains both air and liquid.

Meaning of tin from wikipedia

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