Definition of Kingdom. Meaning of Kingdom. Synonyms of Kingdom

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Kingdom. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Kingdom and, of course, Kingdom synonyms and on the right images related to the word Kingdom.

Definition of Kingdom

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Animal kingdom
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Middle Kingdom
Middle Mid"dle, a. [OE. middel, AS. middel; akin to D. middel, OHG. muttil, G. mittel. ????. See Mid, a.] 1. Equally distant from the extreme either of a number of things or of one thing; mean; medial; as, the middle house in a row; a middle rank or station in life; flowers of middle summer; men of middle age. 2. Intermediate; intervening. Will, seeking good, finds many middle ends. --Sir J. Davies. Note: Middle is sometimes used in the formation of selfexplaining compounds; as, middle-sized, middle-witted. Middle Ages, the period of time intervening between the decline of the Roman Empire and the revival of letters. Hallam regards it as beginning with the sixth and ending with the fifteenth century. Middle class, in England, people who have an intermediate position between the aristocracy and the artisan class. It includes professional men, bankers, merchants, and small landed proprietors The middle-class electorate of Great Britain. --M. Arnold. Middle distance. (Paint.) See Middle-ground. Middle English. See English, n., 2. Middle Kingdom, China. Middle oil (Chem.), that part of the distillate obtained from coal tar which passes over between 170[deg] and 230[deg] Centigrade; -- distinguished from the light, and the heavy or dead, oil. Middle passage, in the slave trade, that part of the Atlantic Ocean between Africa and the West Indies. Middle post. (Arch.) Same as King-post. Middle States, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Delaware; which, at the time of the formation of the Union, occupied a middle position between the Eastern States (or New England) and the Southern States. [U.S.] Middle term (Logic), that term of a syllogism with which the two extremes are separately compared, and by means of which they are brought together in the conclusion. --Brande. Middle tint (Paint.), a subdued or neutral tint. --Fairholt. Middle voice. (Gram.) See under Voice. Middle watch, the period from midnight to four A. M.; also, the men on watch during that time. --Ham. Nav. Encyc. Middle weight, a pugilist, boxer, or wrestler classed as of medium weight, i. e., over 140 and not over 160 lbs., in distinction from those classed as light weights, heavy weights, etc.
Mineral kingdom
Mineral Min"er*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to minerals; consisting of a mineral or of minerals; as, a mineral substance. 2. Impregnated with minerals; as, mineral waters. Mineral acids (Chem.), inorganic acids, as sulphuric, nitric, phosphoric, hydrochloric, acids, etc., as distinguished from the organic acids. Mineral blue, the name usually given to azurite, when reduced to an impalpable powder for coloring purposes. Mineral candle, a candle made of paraffine. Mineral caoutchouc, an elastic mineral pitch, a variety of bitumen, resembling caoutchouc in elasticity and softness. See Caoutchouc, and Elaterite. Mineral chameleon (Chem.) See Chameleon mineral, under Chameleon. Mineral charcoal. See under Charcoal. Mineral cotton. See Mineral wool (below). Mineral green, a green carbonate of copper; malachite. Mineral kingdom (Nat. Sci.), that one of the three grand divisions of nature which embraces all inorganic objects, as distinguished from plants or animals. Mineral oil. See Naphtha, and Petroleum. Mineral paint, a pigment made chiefly of some natural mineral substance, as red or yellow iron ocher. Mineral patch. See Bitumen, and Asphalt. Mineral right, the right of taking minerals from land. Mineral salt (Chem.), a salt of a mineral acid. Mineral tallow, a familiar name for hatchettite, from its fatty or spermaceti-like appearance. Mineral water. See under Water. Mineral wax. See Ozocerite. Mineral wool, a fibrous wool-like material, made by blowing a powerful jet of air or steam through melted slag. It is a poor conductor of heat.
Subkingdom
Subkingdom Sub*king"dom, n. One of the several primary divisions of either the animal, or vegetable kingdom, as, in zo["o]logy, the Vertebrata, Tunicata, Mollusca, Articulata, Molluscoidea, Echinodermata, C[oe]lentera, and the Protozoa; in botany, the Phanerogamia, and the Cryptogamia.
The flowery kingdom
Flowery Flow"er*y, a. 1. Full of flowers; abounding with blossoms. 2. Highly embellished with figurative language; florid; as, a flowery style. --Milton. The flowery kingdom, China.
The United Kingdom
United U*nit"ed, a. Combined; joined; made one. United Brethren. (Eccl.) See Moravian, n. United flowers (Bot.), flowers which have the stamens and pistils in the same flower. The United Kingdom, Great Britain and Ireland; -- so named since January 1, 1801, when the Legislative Union went into operation.
Underkingdom
Underkingdom Un"der*king`dom, n. A subordinate or dependent kingdom. --Tennyson.
Vegetable kingdom
Vegetable kingdom (Nat. Hist.), that primary division of living things which includes all plants. The classes of the vegetable kingdom have been grouped differently by various botanists. The following is one of the best of the many arrangements of the principal subdivisions.

Meaning of Kingdom from wikipedia

- Kingdom may refer to: A type of monarchy: A realm ruled by a king a queen regnant Kingdom (taxonomy), a category in biological taxonomy Kingdom (UK TV...
- The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country lying off the north-western...
- The Kingdom may refer to: The Kingdom, a nickname for County Kerry in Ireland The Kingdom, a nickname for Fife in Scotland The Kingdom of Saudi Arabia...
- For the Kingdom is an EP by the rock band Unisonic. It was released in 2014 on EarMusic Edel AG. The album contains one ****ure album track, an exclusive...
- The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Acts of Union in 1801,...
- The Hashemite Kingdom of Hejaz (Arabic: المملكة الحجازية الهاشمية‎, Al-Mamlakah al-Ḥijāzyah Al-Hāshimīyah) was a state in the Hejaz region in the Middle...
- The Roman Kingdom, also referred to as the Roman monarchy, or the regal period of ancient Rome, was the earliest period of Roman history, when the city...
- The Kingdom of Romania (Romanian: Regatul României) was a constitutional monarchy at the crossroads of Eastern and Southeastern Europe which existed from...
- The Kingdom of Yugoslavia (Serbo-Croatian: Краљевина Југославија / Kraljevina Jugoslavija; Slovene: Kraljevina Jugoslavija) was a state in Southeast Europe...
- The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known internationally as the UK Parliament, British Parliament, or...
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