Definition of Australia. Meaning of Australia. Synonyms of Australia

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Definition of Australia

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Australian
Australian Aus*tra"li*an, a. [From L. Terra Australis southern land.] Of or pertaining to Australia. -- n. A native or an inhabitant of Australia.
Australian ant-eater
Echidna E*chid"na, n. [L., a viper, adder, Gr. ?.] 1. (Gr. Myth.) A monster, half maid and half serpent. 2. (Zo["o]l.) A genus of Monotremata found in Australia, Tasmania, and New Guinea. They are toothless and covered with spines; -- called also porcupine ant-eater, and Australian ant-eater.
Australian ballot
Australian ballot Aus*tra"li*an bal"lot (Law) A system of balloting or voting in public elections, originally used in South Australia, in which there is such an arrangement for polling votes that secrecy is compulsorily maintained, and the ballot used is an official ballot printed and distributed by the government.
Australian bear
Koala Ko*a"la, n. A tailless marsupial (Phascolarctos cinereus), found in Australia. The female carries her young on the back of her neck. Called also Australian bear, native bear, and native sloth.
Australian honeysuckle
Honeysuckle Hon"ey*suc`kle, n. [Cf. AS. hunis?ge privet. See Honey, and Suck.] (Bot.) One of several species of flowering plants, much admired for their beauty, and some for their fragrance. Note: The honeysuckles are properly species of the genus Lonicera; as, L. Caprifolium, and L. Japonica, the commonly cultivated fragrant kinds; L. Periclymenum, the fragrant woodbine of England; L. grata, the American woodbine, and L. sempervirens, the red-flowered trumpet honeysuckle. The European fly honeysuckle is L. Xylosteum; the American, L. ciliata. The American Pinxter flower (Azalea nudiflora) is often called honeysuckle, or false honeysuckle. The name Australian honeysuckle is applied to one or more trees of the genus Banksia. See French honeysuckle, under French.
Australian lancewood
Lancewood Lance"wood`, n. (Bot.) A tough, elastic wood, often used for the shafts of gigs, archery bows, fishing rods, and the like. Also, the tree which produces this wood, Duguetia Quitarensis (a native of Guiana and Cuba), and several other trees of the same family (Anonase[ae]). Australian lancewood, a myrtaceous tree (Backhousia Australis).
Australian nettle
Nettle Net"tle, n. [AS. netele; akin to D. netel, G. nessel, OHG. nezz["i]la, nazza, Dan. nelde, n["a]lde, Sw. n["a]ssla; cf, Lith. notere.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus Urtica, covered with minute sharp hairs containing a poison that produces a stinging sensation. Urtica gracitis is common in the Northern, and U. cham[ae]dryoides in the Southern, United States. the common European species, U. urens and U. dioica, are also found in the Eastern united States. U. pilulifera is the Roman nettle of England. Note: The term nettle has been given to many plants related to, or to some way resembling, the true nettle; as: Australian nettle, a stinging tree or shrub of the genus Laportea (as L. gigas and L. moroides); -- also called nettle tree. Bee nettle, Hemp nettle, a species of Galeopsis. See under Hemp. Blind nettle, Dead nettle, a harmless species of Lamium. False nettle (B[ae]hmeria cylindrica), a plant common in the United States, and related to the true nettles. Hedge nettle, a species of Stachys. See under Hedge. Horse nettle (Solanum Carolinense). See under Horse. nettle tree. (a) Same as Hackberry. (b) See Australian nettle (above). Spurge nettle, a stinging American herb of the Spurge family (Jatropha urens). Wood nettle, a plant (Laportea Canadensis) which stings severely, and is related to the true nettles. Nettle cloth, a kind of thick cotton stuff, japanned, and used as a substitute for leather for various purposes. Nettle rash (Med.), an eruptive disease resembling the effects of whipping with nettles. Sea nettle (Zo["o]l.), a medusa.
Australian or Native
Sloth Sloth, n. [OE. slouthe, sleuthe, AS. sl?w?, fr. sl[=a]w slow. See Slow.] 1. Slowness; tardiness. These cardinals trifle with me; I abhor This dilatory sloth and tricks of Rome. --Shak. 2. Disinclination to action or labor; sluggishness; laziness; idleness. [They] change their course to pleasure, ease, and sloth. --Milton. Sloth, like rust, consumes faster than labor wears. --Franklin. 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of arboreal edentates constituting the family Bradypodid[ae], and the suborder Tardigrada. They have long exserted limbs and long prehensile claws. Both jaws are furnished with teeth (see Illust. of Edentata), and the ears and tail are rudimentary. They inhabit South and Central America and Mexico. Note: The three-toed sloths belong to the genera Bradypus and Arctopithecus, of which several species have been described. They have three toes on each foot. The best-known species are collared sloth (Bradypus tridactylus), and the ai (Arctopitheus ai). The two-toed sloths, consisting the genus Cholopus, have two toes on each fore foot and three on each hind foot. The best-known is the unau (Cholopus didactylus) of South America. See Unau. Another species (C. Hoffmanni) inhabits Central America. Various large extinct terrestrial edentates, such as Megatherium and Mylodon, are often called sloths. Australian, or Native sloth (Zo["o]l.), the koala. Sloth animalcule (Zo["o]l.), a tardigrade. Sloth bear (Zo["o]l.), a black or brown long-haired bear (Melursus ursinus, or labiatus), native of India and Ceylon; -- called also aswail, labiated bear, and jungle bear. It is easily tamed and can be taught many tricks. Sloth monkey (Zo["o]l.), a loris.
Australian or She
Oak Oak ([=o]k), n. [OE. oke, ok, ak, AS. [=a]c; akin to D. eik, G. eiche, OHG. eih, Icel. eik, Sw. ek, Dan. eeg.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Quercus. The oaks have alternate leaves, often variously lobed, and staminate flowers in catkins. The fruit is a smooth nut, called an acorn, which is more or less inclosed in a scaly involucre called the cup or cupule. There are now recognized about three hundred species, of which nearly fifty occur in the United States, the rest in Europe, Asia, and the other parts of North America, a very few barely reaching the northern parts of South America and Africa. Many of the oaks form forest trees of grand proportions and live many centuries. The wood is usually hard and tough, and provided with conspicuous medullary rays, forming the silver grain. 2. The strong wood or timber of the oak. Note: Among the true oaks in America are: Barren oak, or Black-jack, Q. nigra. Basket oak, Q. Michauxii. Black oak, Q. tinctoria; -- called also yellow or quercitron oak. Bur oak (see under Bur.), Q. macrocarpa; -- called also over-cup or mossy-cup oak. Chestnut oak, Q. Prinus and Q. densiflora. Chinquapin oak (see under Chinquapin), Q. prinoides. Coast live oak, Q. agrifolia, of California; -- also called enceno. Live oak (see under Live), Q. virens, the best of all for shipbuilding; also, Q. Chrysolepis, of California. Pin oak. Same as Swamp oak. Post oak, Q. obtusifolia. Red oak, Q. rubra. Scarlet oak, Q. coccinea. Scrub oak, Q. ilicifolia, Q. undulata, etc. Shingle oak, Q. imbricaria. Spanish oak, Q. falcata. Swamp Spanish oak, or Pin oak, Q. palustris. Swamp white oak, Q. bicolor. Water oak, Q. aguatica. Water white oak, Q. lyrata. Willow oak, Q. Phellos. Among the true oaks in Europe are: Bitter oak, or Turkey oak, Q. Cerris (see Cerris). Cork oak, Q. Suber. English white oak, Q. Robur. Evergreen oak, Holly oak, or Holm oak, Q. Ilex. Kermes oak, Q. coccifera. Nutgall oak, Q. infectoria. Note: Among plants called oak, but not of the genus Quercus, are: African oak, a valuable timber tree (Oldfieldia Africana). Australian, or She, oak, any tree of the genus Casuarina (see Casuarina). Indian oak, the teak tree (see Teak). Jerusalem oak. See under Jerusalem. New Zealand oak, a sapindaceous tree (Alectryon excelsum). Poison oak, the poison ivy. See under Poison.
Australian pitcher plant
Pitcher Pitch"er, n. [OE. picher, OF. pichier, OHG. pehhar, pehh[=a]ri; prob. of the same origin as E. beaker. Cf. Beaker.] 1. A wide-mouthed, deep vessel for holding liquids, with a spout or protruding lip and a handle; a water jug or jar with a large ear or handle. 2. (Bot.) A tubular or cuplike appendage or expansion of the leaves of certain plants. American pitcher plants, the species of Sarracenia. See Sarracenia. Australian pitcher plant, the Cephalotus follicularis, a low saxifragaceous herb having two kinds of radical leaves, some oblanceolate and entire, others transformed into little ovoid pitchers, longitudinally triple-winged and ciliated, the mouth covered with a lid shaped like a cockleshell. California pitcher plant, the Darlingtonia California. See Darlingtonia. Pitcher plant, any plant with the whole or a part of the leaves transformed into pitchers or cuplike organs, especially the species of Nepenthes. See Nepenthes.
Australian plum
Note: Two or three hundred varieties of plums derived from the Prunus domestica are described; among them the greengage, the Orleans, the purple gage, or Reine Claude Violette, and the German prune, are some of the best known. Note: Among the true plums are; Beach plum, the Prunus maritima, and its crimson or purple globular drupes, Bullace plum. See Bullace. Chickasaw plum, the American Prunus Chicasa, and its round red drupes. Orleans plum, a dark reddish purple plum of medium size, much grown in England for sale in the markets. Wild plum of America, Prunus Americana, with red or yellow fruit, the original of the Iowa plum and several other varieties. Among plants called plum, but of other genera than Prunus, are; Australian plum, Cargillia arborea and C. australis, of the same family with the persimmon. Blood plum, the West African H[ae]matostaphes Barteri. Cocoa plum, the Spanish nectarine. See under Nectarine. Date plum. See under Date. Gingerbread plum, the West African Parinarium macrophyllum. Gopher plum, the Ogeechee lime. Gray plum, Guinea plum. See under Guinea. Indian plum, several species of Flacourtia. 2. A grape dried in the sun; a raisin. 3. A handsome fortune or property; formerly, in cant language, the sum of [pounds]100,000 sterling; also, the person possessing it. Plum bird, Plum budder (Zo["o]l.), the European bullfinch. Plum gouger (Zo["o]l.), a weevil, or curculio (Coccotorus scutellaris), which destroys plums. It makes round holes in the pulp, for the reception of its eggs. The larva bores into the stone and eats the kernel. Plum weevil (Zo["o]l.), an American weevil which is very destructive to plums, nectarines cherries, and many other stone fruits. It lays its eggs in crescent-shaped incisions made with its jaws. The larva lives upon the pulp around the stone. Called also turk, and plum curculio. See Illust. under Curculio.
Australian sassafras
Sassafras Sas"sa*fras, n. [F. sassafras (cf. It. sassafrasso, sassafras, Sp. sasafras, salsafras, salsifrax, salsifragia, saxifragia), fr. L. saxifraga saxifrage. See Saxifrage.] (Bot.) An American tree of the Laurel family (Sassafras officinale); also, the bark of the roots, which has an aromatic smell and taste. Australian sassafras, a lofty tree (Doryophora Sassafras) with aromatic bark and leaves. Chilian sassafras, an aromatic tree (Laurelia sempervirens). New Zealand sassafras, a similar tree (Laurelia Nov[ae] Zelandi[ae]). Sassafras nut. See Pichurim bean. Swamp sassafras, the sweet bay (Magnolia glauca). See Magnolia.

Meaning of Australia from wikipedia

- 133°E / -25; 133 Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australian continent, the island...
- Australians, colloquially known as Aussies (/ˈɒzi/), are the citizens of the nation Australia, sharing a common history, culture, and language (Australian...
- The Australian is a broadsheet newspaper published in Australia from Monday to Sa****ay each w**** since 14 July 1964. Available nationally (in each state...
- The Prime Minister of Australia is the head of government of Australia. The individual who holds the office is the most senior Minister of the Crown, the...
- Western Australia (abbreviated as WA) is a state occupying the entire western third of Australia. It is bounded by the Indian Ocean to the north and west...
- of Australia (officially known as the Commonwealth of Australia) is a federation of six states, together with ten federal territories. The Australian mainland...
- capital and largest city of the Australian state of Western Australia. It is the fourth-most populous city in Australia, with a po****tion of 2,022,044...
- Victoria (abbreviated as Vic) is a state in south-eastern Australia. Victoria is Australia's most densely po****ted state and its second-most populous...
- Aboriginal Australians are legally defined as people who are members "of the Aboriginal race of Australia" (indigenous to mainland Australia or to the...
- The Government of the Commonwealth of Australia (also referred to as the Australian Government, the Commonwealth Government, the Federal Government, and...
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