Definition of Tortoise. Meaning of Tortoise. Synonyms of Tortoise

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Tortoise. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Tortoise and, of course, Tortoise synonyms and on the right images related to the word Tortoise.

Definition of Tortoise

No result for Tortoise. Showing similar results...

Alligator tortoise
Alligator Al"li*ga`tor, n. [Sp. el lagarto the lizard (el lagarto de Indias, the cayman or American crocodile), fr. L. lacertus, lacerta, lizard. See Lizard.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A large carnivorous reptile of the Crocodile family, peculiar to America. It has a shorter and broader snout than the crocodile, and the large teeth of the lower jaw shut into pits in the upper jaw, which has no marginal notches. Besides the common species of the southern United States, there are allied species in South America. 2. (Mech.) Any machine with strong jaws, one of which opens like the movable jaw of an alligator; as, (a) (Metal Working) a form of squeezer for the puddle ball; (b) (Mining) a rock breaker; (c) (Printing) a kind of job press, called also alligator press. Alligator apple (Bot.), the fruit of the Anona palustris, a West Indian tree. It is said to be narcotic in its properties. --Loudon. Alligator fish (Zo["o]l.), a marine fish of northwestern America (Podothecus acipenserinus). Alligator gar (Zo["o]l.), one of the gar pikes (Lepidosteus spatula) found in the southern rivers of the United States. The name is also applied to other species of gar pikes. Alligator pear (Bot.), a corruption of Avocado pear. See Avocado. Alligator snapper, Alligator tortoise, Alligator turtle (Zo["o]l.), a very large and voracious turtle (Macrochelys lacertina) inhabiting the rivers of the southern United States. It sometimes reaches the weight of two hundred pounds. Unlike the common snapping turtle, to which the name is sometimes erroneously applied, it has a scaly head and many small scales beneath the tail. This name is sometimes given to other turtles, as to species of Trionyx. Alligator wood, the timber of a tree of the West Indies (Guarea Swartzii).
Bearded tortoise
Bearded Beard"ed, a. Having a beard. ``Bearded fellow.' --Shak. ``Bearded grain.' --Dryden. Bearded vulture, Bearded eagle. (Zo["o]l.) See Lammergeir. Bearded tortoise. (Zo["o]l.) See Matamata.
leather-backed tortoise
Leatherback Leath"er*back`, n. (Zo["o]l.) A large sea turtle (Sphargis coriacea), having no bony shell on its back. It is common in the warm and temperate parts of the Atlantic, and sometimes weighs over a thousand pounds; -- called also leather turtle, leathery turtle, leather-backed tortoise, etc.
Mud tortoise
Mud Mud, n. [Akin to LG. mudde, D. modder, G. moder mold, OSw. modd mud, Sw. modder mother, Dan. mudder mud. Cf. Mother a scum on liquors.] Earth and water mixed so as to be soft and adhesive. Mud bass (Zo["o]l.), a fresh-water fish (Acantharchum pomotis) of the Eastern United States. It produces a deep grunting note. Mud bath, an immersion of the body, or some part of it, in mud charged with medicinal agents, as a remedy for disease. Mud boat, a large flatboat used in deredging. Mud cat. See Catfish. Mud crab (Zo["o]l.), any one of several American marine crabs of the genus Panopeus. Mud dab (Zo["o]l.), the winter flounder. See Flounder, and Dab. Mud dauber (Zo["o]l.), a mud wasp. Mud devil (Zo["o]l.), the fellbender. Mud drum (Steam Boilers), a drum beneath a boiler, into which sediment and mud in the water can settle for removal. Mud eel (Zo["o]l.), a long, slender, aquatic amphibian (Siren lacertina), found in the Southern United States. It has persistent external gills and only the anterior pair of legs. See Siren. Mud frog (Zo["o]l.), a European frog (Pelobates fuscus). Mud hen. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The American coot (Fulica Americana). (b) The clapper rail. Mud lark, a person who cleans sewers, or delves in mud. [Slang] Mud minnow (Zo["o]l.), any small American fresh-water fish of the genus Umbra, as U. limi. The genus is allied to the pickerels. Mud plug, a plug for stopping the mudhole of a boiler. Mud puppy (Zo["o]l.), the menobranchus. Mud scow, a heavy scow, used in dredging; a mud boat. [U.S.] Mud turtle, Mud tortoise (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of fresh-water tortoises of the United States. Mud wasp (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to Pep[ae]us, and allied genera, which construct groups of mud cells, attached, side by side, to stones or to the woodwork of buildings, etc. The female places an egg in each cell, together with spiders or other insects, paralyzed by a sting, to serve as food for the larva. Called also mud dauber.
Pond tortoise
Pond spice (Bot.), an American shrub (Tetranthera geniculata) of the Laurel family, with small oval leaves, and axillary clusters of little yellow flowers. The whole plant is spicy. It grows in ponds and swamps from Virginia to Florida. Pond tortoise, Pond turtle (Zo["o]l.), any freshwater tortoise of the family Emydid[ae]. Numerous species are found in North America.
River tortoise
River Riv"er, n. [F. riv[`e]re a river, LL. riparia river, bank of a river, fr. L. riparius belonging to a bank or shore, fr. ripa a bank or shore; of uncertain origin. Cf. Arrive, Riparian.] 1. A large stream of water flowing in a bed or channel and emptying into the ocean, a sea, a lake, or another stream; a stream larger than a rivulet or brook. Transparent and sparkling rivers, from which it is delightful to drink as they flow. --Macaulay. 2. Fig.: A large stream; copious flow; abundance; as, rivers of blood; rivers of oil. River chub (Zo["o]l.), the hornyhead and allied species of fresh-water fishes. River crab (Zo["o]l.), any species of fresh-water crabs of the genus Thelphusa, as T. depressa of Southern Europe. River dragon, a crocodile; -- applied by Milton to the king of Egypt. River driver, a lumberman who drives or conducts logs down rivers. --Bartlett. River duck (Zo["o]l.), any species of duck belonging to Anas, Spatula, and allied genera, in which the hind toe is destitute of a membranous lobe, as in the mallard and pintail; -- opposed to sea duck. River god, a deity supposed to preside over a river as its tutelary divinity. River herring (Zo["o]l.), an alewife. River hog. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any species of African wild hogs of the genus Potamoch[oe]rus. They frequent wet places along the rivers. (b) The capybara. River horse (Zo["o]l.), the hippopotamus. River jack (Zo["o]l.), an African puff adder (Clotho nasicornis) having a spine on the nose. River limpet (Zo["o]l.), a fresh-water, air-breathing mollusk of the genus Ancylus, having a limpet-shaped shell. River pirate (Zo["o]l.), the pike. River snail (Zo["o]l.), any species of fresh-water gastropods of Paludina, Melontho, and allied genera. See Pond snail, under Pond. River tortoise (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous fresh-water tortoises inhabiting rivers, especially those of the genus Trionyx and allied genera. See Trionyx.
Sculptured tortoise
Sculpture Sculp"ture (?; 135), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Sculptured; p. pr. & vb. n. Sculpturing.] To form with the chisel on, in, or from, wood, stone, or metal; to carve; to engrave. Sculptured tortoise (Zo["o]l.), a common North American wood tortoise (Glyptemys insculpta). The shell is marked with strong grooving and ridges which resemble sculptured figures.
soft tortoise
Trionyx Tri*on"yx, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ? (see Tri-) + ? a claw.] (Zo["o]l.) A genus of fresh-water or river turtles which have the shell imperfectly developed and covered with a soft leathery skin. They are noted for their agility and rapacity. Called also soft tortoise, soft-shell tortoise, and mud turtle. Note: The common American species (Trionyx, or Aspidonectus, ferox) becomes over a foot in length and is very voracious. Similar species are found in Asia and Africa.
soft-shell tortoise
Trionyx Tri*on"yx, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ? (see Tri-) + ? a claw.] (Zo["o]l.) A genus of fresh-water or river turtles which have the shell imperfectly developed and covered with a soft leathery skin. They are noted for their agility and rapacity. Called also soft tortoise, soft-shell tortoise, and mud turtle. Note: The common American species (Trionyx, or Aspidonectus, ferox) becomes over a foot in length and is very voracious. Similar species are found in Asia and Africa.
tortoise-shell tiger
Tiger Ti"ger, n. [OE. tigre, F. tigre, L. tigris, Gr. ti`gris; probably of Persian origin; cf. Zend tighra pointed, tighri an arrow, Per. t[=i]r; perhaps akin to E. stick, v.t.; -- probably so named from its quickness.] 1. A very large and powerful carnivore (Felis tigris) native of Southern Asia and the East Indies. Its back and sides are tawny or rufous yellow, transversely striped with black, the tail is ringed with black, the throat and belly are nearly white. When full grown, it equals or exceeds the lion in size and strength. Called also royal tiger, and Bengal tiger. 2. Fig.: A ferocious, bloodthirsty person. As for heinous tiger, Tamora. --Shak. 3. A servant in livery, who rides with his master or mistress. --Dickens. 4. A kind of growl or screech, after cheering; as, three cheers and a tiger. [Colloq. U. S.] 5. A pneumatic box or pan used in refining sugar. American tiger. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The puma. (b) The jaguar. Clouded tiger (Zo["o]l.), a handsome striped and spotted carnivore (Felis macrocelis or F. marmorata) native of the East Indies and Southern Asia. Its body is about three and a half feet long, and its tail about three feet long. Its ground color is brownish gray, and the dark markings are irregular stripes, spots, and rings, but there are always two dark bands on the face, one extending back from the eye, and one from the angle of the mouth. Called also tortoise-shell tiger. Mexican tiger (Zo["o]l.), the jaguar. Tiger beetle (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of active carnivorous beetles of the family Cicindelid[ae]. They usually inhabit dry or sandy places, and fly rapidly. Tiger bittern. (Zo["o]l.) See Sun bittern, under Sun. Tiger cat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of wild cats of moderate size with dark transverse bars or stripes somewhat resembling those of the tiger. Tiger flower (Bot.), an iridaceous plant of the genus Tigridia (as T. conchiflora, T. grandiflora, etc.) having showy flowers, spotted or streaked somewhat like the skin of a tiger. Tiger grass (Bot.), a low East Indian fan palm (Cham[ae]rops Ritchieana). It is used in many ways by the natives. --J. Smith (Dict. Econ. Plants). Tiger lily. (Bot.) See under Lily. Tiger moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of moths of the family Arctiad[ae] which are striped or barred with black and white or with other conspicuous colors. The larv[ae] are called woolly bears. Tiger shark (Zo["o]l.), a voracious shark (Galeocerdo maculatus or tigrinus) more or less barred or spotted with yellow. It is found in both the Atlantic and Indian Ocean. Called also zebra shark. Tiger shell (Zo["o]l.), a large and conspicuously spotted cowrie (Cypr[ae]a tigris); -- so called from its fancied resemblance to a tiger in color and markings. Called also tiger cowrie. Tiger wolf (Zo["o]l.), the spotted hyena (Hy[ae]na crocuta). Tiger wood, the variegated heartwood of a tree (Mach[ae]rium Schomburgkii) found in Guiana.
Wood tortoise
Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; -- frequently used in the plural. Light thickens, and the crow Makes wing to the rooky wood. --Shak. 2. The substance of trees and the like; the hard fibrous substance which composes the body of a tree and its branches, and which is covered by the bark; timber. ``To worship their own work in wood and stone for gods.' --Milton. 3. (Bot.) The fibrous material which makes up the greater part of the stems and branches of trees and shrubby plants, and is found to a less extent in herbaceous stems. It consists of elongated tubular or needle-shaped cells of various kinds, usually interwoven with the shinning bands called silver grain. Note: Wood consists chiefly of the carbohydrates cellulose and lignin, which are isomeric with starch. 4. Trees cut or sawed for the fire or other uses. Wood acid, Wood vinegar (Chem.), a complex acid liquid obtained in the dry distillation of wood, and containing large quantities of acetic acid; hence, specifically, acetic acid. Formerly called pyroligneous acid. Wood anemone (Bot.), a delicate flower (Anemone nemorosa) of early spring; -- also called windflower. See Illust. of Anemone. Wood ant (Zo["o]l.), a large ant (Formica rufa) which lives in woods and forests, and constructs large nests. Wood apple (Bot.). See Elephant apple, under Elephant. Wood baboon (Zo["o]l.), the drill. Wood betony. (Bot.) (a) Same as Betony. (b) The common American lousewort (Pedicularis Canadensis), a low perennial herb with yellowish or purplish flowers. Wood borer. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The larva of any one of numerous species of boring beetles, esp. elaters, longicorn beetles, buprestidans, and certain weevils. See Apple borer, under Apple, and Pine weevil, under Pine. (b) The larva of any one of various species of lepidopterous insects, especially of the clearwing moths, as the peach-tree borer (see under Peach), and of the goat moths. (c) The larva of various species of hymenopterous of the tribe Urocerata. See Tremex. (d) Any one of several bivalve shells which bore in wood, as the teredos, and species of Xylophaga. (e) Any one of several species of small Crustacea, as the Limnoria, and the boring amphipod (Chelura terebrans). Wood carpet, a kind of floor covering made of thin pieces of wood secured to a flexible backing, as of cloth. --Knight. Wood cell (Bot.), a slender cylindrical or prismatic cell usually tapering to a point at both ends. It is the principal constituent of woody fiber. Wood choir, the choir, or chorus, of birds in the woods. [Poetic] --Coleridge. Wood coal, charcoal; also, lignite, or brown coal. Wood cricket (Zo["o]l.), a small European cricket (Nemobius sylvestris). Wood culver (Zo["o]l.), the wood pigeon. Wood cut, an engraving on wood; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood dove (Zo["o]l.), the stockdove. Wood drink, a decoction or infusion of medicinal woods. Wood duck (Zo["o]l.) (a) A very beautiful American duck (Aix sponsa). The male has a large crest, and its plumage is varied with green, purple, black, white, and red. It builds its nest in trees, whence the name. Called also bridal duck, summer duck, and wood widgeon. (b) The hooded merganser. (c) The Australian maned goose (Chlamydochen jubata). Wood echo, an echo from the wood. Wood engraver. (a) An engraver on wood. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any of several species of small beetles whose larv[ae] bore beneath the bark of trees, and excavate furrows in the wood often more or less resembling coarse engravings; especially, Xyleborus xylographus. Wood engraving. (a) The act or art engraving on wood; xylography. (b) An engraving on wood; a wood cut; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood fern. (Bot.) See Shield fern, under Shield. Wood fiber. (a) (Bot.) Fibrovascular tissue. (b) Wood comminuted, and reduced to a powdery or dusty mass. Wood fretter (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of beetles whose larv[ae] bore in the wood, or beneath the bark, of trees. Wood frog (Zo["o]l.), a common North American frog (Rana sylvatica) which lives chiefly in the woods, except during the breeding season. It is drab or yellowish brown, with a black stripe on each side of the head. Wood germander. (Bot.) See under Germander. Wood god, a fabled sylvan deity. Wood grass. (Bot.) See under Grass. Wood grouse. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The capercailzie. (b) The spruce partridge. See under Spruce. Wood guest (Zo["o]l.), the ringdove. [Prov. Eng.] Wood hen. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of Old World short-winged rails of the genus Ocydromus, including the weka and allied species. (b) The American woodcock. Wood hoopoe (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World arboreal birds belonging to Irrisor and allied genera. They are closely allied to the common hoopoe, but have a curved beak, and a longer tail. Wood ibis (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of large, long-legged, wading birds belonging to the genus Tantalus. The head and neck are naked or scantily covered with feathers. The American wood ibis (Tantalus loculator) is common in Florida. Wood lark (Zo["o]l.), a small European lark (Alauda arborea), which, like, the skylark, utters its notes while on the wing. So called from its habit of perching on trees. Wood laurel (Bot.), a European evergreen shrub (Daphne Laureola). Wood leopard (Zo["o]l.), a European spotted moth (Zeuzera [ae]sculi) allied to the goat moth. Its large fleshy larva bores in the wood of the apple, pear, and other fruit trees. Wood lily (Bot.), the lily of the valley. Wood lock (Naut.), a piece of wood close fitted and sheathed with copper, in the throating or score of the pintle, to keep the rudder from rising. Wood louse (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial isopod Crustacea belonging to Oniscus, Armadillo, and related genera. See Sow bug, under Sow, and Pill bug, under Pill. (b) Any one of several species of small, wingless, pseudoneuropterous insects of the family Psocid[ae], which live in the crevices of walls and among old books and papers. Some of the species are called also book lice, and deathticks, or deathwatches. Wood mite (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous small mites of the family Oribatid[ae]. They are found chiefly in woods, on tree trunks and stones. Wood mote. (Eng. Law) (a) Formerly, the forest court. (b) The court of attachment. Wood nettle. (Bot.) See under Nettle. Wood nightshade (Bot.), woody nightshade. Wood nut (Bot.), the filbert. Wood nymph. (a) A nymph inhabiting the woods; a fabled goddess of the woods; a dryad. ``The wood nymphs, decked with daisies trim.' --Milton. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored moths belonging to the genus Eudryas. The larv[ae] are bright-colored, and some of the species, as Eudryas grata, and E. unio, feed on the leaves of the grapevine. (c) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored South American humming birds belonging to the genus Thalurania. The males are bright blue, or green and blue. Wood offering, wood burnt on the altar. We cast the lots . . . for the wood offering. --Neh. x. 34. Wood oil (Bot.), a resinous oil obtained from several East Indian trees of the genus Dipterocarpus, having properties similar to those of copaiba, and sometimes substituted for it. It is also used for mixing paint. See Gurjun. Wood opal (Min.), a striped variety of coarse opal, having some resemblance to wood. Wood paper, paper made of wood pulp. See Wood pulp, below. Wood pewee (Zo["o]l.), a North American tyrant flycatcher (Contopus virens). It closely resembles the pewee, but is smaller. Wood pie (Zo["o]l.), any black and white woodpecker, especially the European great spotted woodpecker. Wood pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of Old World pigeons belonging to Palumbus and allied genera of the family Columbid[ae]. (b) The ringdove. Wood puceron (Zo["o]l.), a plant louse. Wood pulp (Technol.), vegetable fiber obtained from the poplar and other white woods, and so softened by digestion with a hot solution of alkali that it can be formed into sheet paper, etc. It is now produced on an immense scale. Wood quail (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of East Indian crested quails belonging to Rollulus and allied genera, as the red-crested wood quail (R. roulroul), the male of which is bright green, with a long crest of red hairlike feathers. Wood rabbit (Zo["o]l.), the cottontail. Wood rat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of American wild rats of the genus Neotoma found in the Southern United States; -- called also bush rat. The Florida wood rat (Neotoma Floridana) is the best-known species. Wood reed grass (Bot.), a tall grass (Cinna arundinacea) growing in moist woods. Wood reeve, the steward or overseer of a wood. [Eng.] Wood rush (Bot.), any plant of the genus Luzula, differing from the true rushes of the genus Juncus chiefly in having very few seeds in each capsule. Wood sage (Bot.), a name given to several labiate plants of the genus Teucrium. See Germander. Wood screw, a metal screw formed with a sharp thread, and usually with a slotted head, for insertion in wood. Wood sheldrake (Zo["o]l.), the hooded merganser. Wood shock (Zo["o]l.), the fisher. See Fisher, 2. Wood shrike (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World singing birds belonging to Grallina, Collyricincla, Prionops, and allied genera, common in India and Australia. They are allied to the true shrikes, but feed upon both insects and berries. Wood snipe. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The American woodcock. (b) An Asiatic snipe (Gallinago nemoricola). Wood soot, soot from burnt wood. Wood sore. (Zo["o]l.) See Cuckoo spit, under Cuckoo. Wood sorrel (Bot.), a plant of the genus Oxalis (Oxalis Acetosella), having an acid taste. See Illust. (a) of Shamrock. Wood spirit. (Chem.) See Methyl alcohol, under Methyl. Wood stamp, a carved or engraved block or stamp of wood, for impressing figures or colors on fabrics. Wood star (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small South American humming birds belonging to the genus Calothorax. The male has a brilliant gorget of blue, purple, and other colors. Wood sucker (Zo["o]l.), the yaffle. Wood swallow (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World passerine birds belonging to the genus Artamus and allied genera of the family Artamid[ae]. They are common in the East Indies, Asia, and Australia. In form and habits they resemble swallows, but in structure they resemble shrikes. They are usually black above and white beneath. Wood tapper (Zo["o]l.), any woodpecker. Wood tar. See under Tar. Wood thrush, (Zo["o]l.) (a) An American thrush (Turdus mustelinus) noted for the sweetness of its song. See under Thrush. (b) The missel thrush. Wood tick. See in Vocabulary. Wood tin. (Min.). See Cassiterite. Wood titmouse (Zo["o]l.), the goldcgest. Wood tortoise (Zo["o]l.), the sculptured tortoise. See under Sculptured. Wood vine (Bot.), the white bryony. Wood vinegar. See Wood acid, above. Wood warbler. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of American warblers of the genus Dendroica. See Warbler. (b) A European warbler (Phylloscopus sibilatrix); -- called also green wren, wood wren, and yellow wren. Wood worm (Zo["o]l.), a larva that bores in wood; a wood borer. Wood wren. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The wood warbler. (b) The willow warbler.

Meaning of Tortoise from wikipedia

- Tortoises (/ˈtɔːr.təs.ɪz/) are reptile species of the family Testudinidae of the order Testudines (the turtles). They are particularly distinguished from...
- Galápagos tortoise complex or Galápagos giant tortoise complex (Chelonoidis nigra and related species) are the largest living species of tortoise. Modern...
- as the Fernandina Island Galápagos tortoise or Narborough Island giant tortoise) is a species of Galápagos tortoise that was last seen in 1906, until a...
- Aldabra giant tortoise (Aldabrachelys gigantea), from the islands of the Aldabra Atoll in the Seyc****es, is one of the largest tortoises in the world...
- "The Tortoise and the Hare" is one of Aesop's Fables and is numbered 226 in the Perry Index. The account of a race between unequal partners has attracted...
- The African spurred tortoise (Centrochelys sulcata), also called the sulcata tortoise, is a species of tortoise, which inhabits the southern edge of the...
- Giant tortoises are any of various large land tortoises formerly common on the islands of the western Indian Ocean and on the Galápagos Islands Giant...
- The desert tortoise (Gopherus ag****izii), is a species of tortoise native to the Mojave and Sonoran Deserts of the southwestern United States and northwestern...
- stood, replied, "On a tortoise." But on what does the tortoise stand? "On another tortoise." With Mr. Barker, too, there are tortoises all the way down. (Vehement...
- The Black Tortoise or Black Turtle (Chinese: 玄武; pinyin: Xuánwǔ) is one of the Four Symbols of the Chinese constellations. Despite its English name, it...
Loading...