Definition of Lizard. Meaning of Lizard. Synonyms of Lizard

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Definition of Lizard

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Frilled lizard
Frilled Frilled, a. Furnished with a frill or frills. Frilled lizard (Zo["o]l.), a large Australian lizard (Chlamydosaurus Kingii) about three feet long, which has a large, erectile frill on each side of the neck.
Horned lizard
Horned Horned, a. Furnished with a horn or horns; furnished with a hornlike process or appendage; as, horned cattle; having some part shaped like a horn. The horned moon with one bright star Within the nether tip. --Coleridge. Horned bee (Zo["o]l.), a British wild bee (Osmia bicornis), having two little horns on the head. Horned dace (Zo["o]l.), an American cyprinoid fish (Semotilus corporialis) common in brooks and ponds; the common chub. See Illust. of Chub. Horned frog (Zo["o]l.), a very large Brazilian frog (Ceratophrys cornuta), having a pair of triangular horns arising from the eyelids. Horned grebe (Zo["o]l.), a species of grebe (Colymbus auritus), of Arctic Europe and America, having two dense tufts of feathers on the head. Horned horse (Zo["o]l.), the gnu. Horned lark (Zo["o]l.), the shore lark. Horned lizard (Zo["o]l.), the horned toad. Horned owl (Zo["o]l.), a large North American owl (Bubo Virginianus), having a pair of elongated tufts of feathers on the head. Several distinct varieties are known; as, the Arctic, Western, dusky, and striped horned owls, differing in color, and inhabiting different regions; -- called also great horned owl, horn owl, eagle owl, and cat owl. Sometimes also applied to the long-eared owl. See Eared owl, under Eared. Horned poppy. (Bot.) See Horn poppy, under Horn. Horned pout (Zo["o]l.), an American fresh-water siluroid fish; the bullpout. Horned rattler (Zo["o]l.), a species of rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes), inhabiting the dry, sandy plains, from California to Mexico. It has a pair of triangular horns between the eyes; -- called also sidewinder. Horned ray (Zo["o]l.), the sea devil. Horned screamer (Zo["o]l.), the kamichi. Horned snake (Zo["o]l.), the cerastes. Horned toad (Zo["o]l.), any lizard of the genus Phrynosoma, of which nine or ten species are known. These lizards have several hornlike spines on the head, and a broad, flat body, covered with spiny scales. They inhabit the dry, sandy plains from California to Mexico and Texas. Called also horned lizard. Horned viper. (Zo["o]l.) See Cerastes.
horned lizard
Horned Horned, a. Furnished with a horn or horns; furnished with a hornlike process or appendage; as, horned cattle; having some part shaped like a horn. The horned moon with one bright star Within the nether tip. --Coleridge. Horned bee (Zo["o]l.), a British wild bee (Osmia bicornis), having two little horns on the head. Horned dace (Zo["o]l.), an American cyprinoid fish (Semotilus corporialis) common in brooks and ponds; the common chub. See Illust. of Chub. Horned frog (Zo["o]l.), a very large Brazilian frog (Ceratophrys cornuta), having a pair of triangular horns arising from the eyelids. Horned grebe (Zo["o]l.), a species of grebe (Colymbus auritus), of Arctic Europe and America, having two dense tufts of feathers on the head. Horned horse (Zo["o]l.), the gnu. Horned lark (Zo["o]l.), the shore lark. Horned lizard (Zo["o]l.), the horned toad. Horned owl (Zo["o]l.), a large North American owl (Bubo Virginianus), having a pair of elongated tufts of feathers on the head. Several distinct varieties are known; as, the Arctic, Western, dusky, and striped horned owls, differing in color, and inhabiting different regions; -- called also great horned owl, horn owl, eagle owl, and cat owl. Sometimes also applied to the long-eared owl. See Eared owl, under Eared. Horned poppy. (Bot.) See Horn poppy, under Horn. Horned pout (Zo["o]l.), an American fresh-water siluroid fish; the bullpout. Horned rattler (Zo["o]l.), a species of rattlesnake (Crotalus cerastes), inhabiting the dry, sandy plains, from California to Mexico. It has a pair of triangular horns between the eyes; -- called also sidewinder. Horned ray (Zo["o]l.), the sea devil. Horned screamer (Zo["o]l.), the kamichi. Horned snake (Zo["o]l.), the cerastes. Horned toad (Zo["o]l.), any lizard of the genus Phrynosoma, of which nine or ten species are known. These lizards have several hornlike spines on the head, and a broad, flat body, covered with spiny scales. They inhabit the dry, sandy plains from California to Mexico and Texas. Called also horned lizard. Horned viper. (Zo["o]l.) See Cerastes.
Lace lizard
Lace Lace (l[=a]s), n. [OE. las, OF. laz, F. lacs, dim. lacet, fr. L. laqueus noose, snare; prob. akin to lacere to entice. Cf. Delight, Elicit, Lasso, Latchet.] 1. That which binds or holds, especially by being interwoven; a string, cord, or band, usually one passing through eyelet or other holes, and used in drawing and holding together parts of a garment, of a shoe, of a machine belt, etc. His hat hung at his back down by a lace. --Chaucer. For striving more, the more in laces strong Himself he tied. --Spenser. 2. A snare or gin, especially one made of interwoven cords; a net. [Obs.] --Fairfax. Vulcanus had caught thee [Venus] in his lace. --Chaucer. 3. A fabric of fine threads of linen, silk, cotton, etc., often ornamented with figures; a delicate tissue of thread, much worn as an ornament of dress. Our English dames are much given to the wearing of costlylaces. --Bacon. 4. Spirits added to coffee or some other beverage. [Old Slang] --Addison. Alencon lace, a kind of point lace, entirely of needlework, first made at Alencon in France, in the 17th century. It is very durable and of great beauty and cost. Bone lace, Brussels lace, etc. See under Bone, Brussels, etc. Gold lace, or Silver lace, lace having warp threads of silk, or silk and cotton, and a weft of silk threads covered with gold (or silver), or with gilt. Lace leather, thin, oil-tanned leather suitable for cutting into lacings for machine belts. Lace lizard (Zo["o]l.), a large, aquatic, Australian lizard (Hydrosaurus giganteus), allied to the monitors. Lace paper, paper with an openwork design in imitation of lace. Lace piece (Shipbuilding), the main piece of timber which supports the beak or head projecting beyond the stem of a ship. Lace pillow, & Pillow lace. See under Pillow.
lizard fish
Saury Sau"ry, n.; pl. Sauries. [Etymol. uncertain.] (Zo["o]l.) A slender marine fish (Scomberesox saurus) of Europe and America. It has long, thin, beaklike jaws. Called also billfish, gowdnook, gawnook, skipper, skipjack, skopster, lizard fish, and Egypt herring.
Pine lizard
Pine Pine, n. [AS. p[=i]n, L. pinus.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus Pinus. See Pinus. Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United States, of which the white pine (P. Strobus), the Georgia pine (P. australis), the red pine (P. resinosa), and the great West Coast sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) are among the most valuable. The Scotch pine or fir, also called Norway or Riga pine (Pinus sylvestris), is the only British species. The nut pine is any pine tree, or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See Pinon. The spruces, firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other genera. 2. The wood of the pine tree. 3. A pineapple. Ground pine. (Bot.) See under Ground. Norfolk Island pine (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree, the Araucaria excelsa. Pine barren, a tract of infertile land which is covered with pines. [Southern U.S.] Pine borer (Zo["o]l.), any beetle whose larv[ae] bore into pine trees. Pine finch. (Zo["o]l.) See Pinefinch, in the Vocabulary. Pine grosbeak (Zo["o]l.), a large grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), which inhabits the northern parts of both hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with red. Pine lizard (Zo["o]l.), a small, very active, mottled gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus), native of the Middle States; -- called also swift, brown scorpion, and alligator. Pine marten. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European weasel (Mustela martes), called also sweet marten, and yellow-breasted marten. (b) The American sable. See Sable. Pine moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small tortricid moths of the genus Retinia, whose larv[ae] burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often doing great damage. Pine mouse (Zo["o]l.), an American wild mouse (Arvicola pinetorum), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine forests. Pine needle (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves of a pine tree. See Pinus. Pine-needle wool. See Pine wool (below). Pine oil, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors. Pine snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless North American snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). It is whitish, covered with brown blotches having black margins. Called also bull snake. The Western pine snake (P. Sayi) is chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange. Pine tree (Bot.), a tree of the genus Pinus; pine. Pine-tree money, money coined in Massachusetts in the seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a figure of a pine tree. Pine weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of weevils whose larv[ae] bore in the wood of pine trees. Several species are known in both Europe and America, belonging to the genera Pissodes, Hylobius, etc. Pine wool, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic arts; -- called also pine-needle wool, and pine-wood wool.
Sand lizard
Sand grouse (Zo["o]l.), any one of many species of Old World birds belonging to the suborder Pterocletes, and resembling both grouse and pigeons. Called also rock grouse, rock pigeon, and ganga. They mostly belong to the genus Pterocles, as the common Indian species (P. exustus). The large sand grouse (P. arenarius), the painted sand grouse (P. fasciatus), and the pintail sand grouse (P. alchata) are also found in India. See Illust. under Pterocletes. Sand hill, a hill of sand; a dune. Sand-hill crane (Zo["o]l.), the American brown crane (Grus Mexicana). Sand hopper (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea; an orchestian. Sand hornet (Zo["o]l.), a sand wasp. Sand lark. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A small lark (Alaudala raytal), native of India. (b) A small sandpiper, or plover, as the ringneck, the sanderling, and the common European sandpiper. (c) The Australian red-capped dotterel ([AE]gialophilus ruficapillus); -- called also red-necked plover. Sand launce (Zo["o]l.), a lant, or launce. Sand lizard (Zo["o]l.), a common European lizard (Lacerta agilis). Sand martin (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. Sand mole (Zo["o]l.), the coast rat. Sand monitor (Zo["o]l.), a large Egyptian lizard (Monitor arenarius) which inhabits dry localities. Sand mouse (Zo["o]l.), the dunlin. [Prov. Eng.] Sand myrtle. (Bot.) See under Myrtle. Sand partridge (Zo["o]l.), either of two small Asiatic partridges of the genus Ammoperdix. The wings are long and the tarsus is spurless. One species (A. Heeji) inhabits Palestine and Arabia. The other species (A. Bonhami), inhabiting Central Asia, is called also seesee partridge, and teehoo. Sand picture, a picture made by putting sand of different colors on an adhesive surface. Sand pike. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The sauger. (b) The lizard fish. Sand pillar, a sand storm which takes the form of a whirling pillar in its progress in desert tracts like those of the Sahara and Mongolia. Sand pipe (Geol.), a tubular cavity, from a few inches to several feet in depth, occurring especially in calcareous rocks, and often filled with gravel, sand, etc.; -- called also sand gall. Sand pride (Zo["o]l.), a small British lamprey now considered to be the young of larger species; -- called also sand prey. Sand pump, in artesian well boring, a long, slender bucket with a valve at the bottom for raising sand from the well. Sand rat (Zo["o]l.), the pocket gopher. Sand rock, a rock made of cemented sand. Sand runner (Zo["o]l.), the turnstone. Sand saucer (Zo["o]l.), the mass of egg capsules, or o["o]thec[ae], of any mollusk of the genus Natica and allied genera. It has the shape of a bottomless saucer, and is coated with fine sand; -- called also sand collar. Sand screw (Zo["o]l.), an amphipod crustacean (Lepidactylis arenarius), which burrows in the sandy seabeaches of Europe and America. Sand shark (Zo["o]l.), an American shark (Odontaspis littoralis) found on the sandy coasts of the Eastern United States; -- called also gray shark, and dogfish shark. See Illust. under Remora. Sand skink (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World lizards belonging to the genus Seps; as, the ocellated sand skink (Seps ocellatus) of Southern Europe. Sand skipper (Zo["o]l.), a beach flea, or orchestian. Sand smelt (Zo["o]l.), a silverside. Sand snake. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of harmless burrowing snakes of the genus Eryx, native of Southern Europe, Africa, and Asia, especially E. jaculus of India and E. Johnii, used by snake charmers. (b) Any innocuous South African snake of the genus Psammophis, especially P. sibilans. Sand snipe (Zo["o]l.), the sandpiper. Sand star (Zo["o]l.), an ophiurioid starfish living on sandy sea bottoms; a brittle star. Sand storm, a cloud of sand driven violently by the wind. Sand sucker, the sandnecker. Sand swallow (Zo["o]l.), the bank swallow. See under Bank. Sand tube, a tube made of sand. Especially: (a) A tube of vitrified sand, produced by a stroke of lightning; a fulgurite. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any tube made of cemented sand. (c) (Zo["o]l.) In starfishes, a tube having calcareous particles in its wall, which connects the oral water tube with the madreporic plate. Sand viper. (Zo["o]l.) See Hognose snake. Sand wasp (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of hymenopterous insects belonging to the families Pompilid[ae] and Spherid[ae], which dig burrows in sand. The female provisions the nest with insects or spiders which she paralyzes by stinging, and which serve as food for her young.
sleeping lizard
Stump-tailed Stump"-tailed`, a. Having a short, thick tail. Stump-tailed lizard (Zo["o]l.), a singular Australian scincoid lizard (Trachydosaurus rugosus) having a short, thick tail resembling its head in form; -- called also sleeping lizard.
Star lizard
Blazing star, Double star, Multiple star, Shooting star, etc. See under Blazing, Double, etc. Nebulous star (Astron.), a small well-defined circular nebula, having a bright nucleus at its center like a star. Star anise (Bot.), any plant of the genus Illicium; -- so called from its star-shaped capsules. Star apple (Bot.), a tropical American tree (Chrysophyllum Cainito), having a milky juice and oblong leaves with a silky-golden pubescence beneath. It bears an applelike fruit, the carpels of which present a starlike figure when cut across. The name is extended to the whole genus of about sixty species, and the natural order (Sapotace[ae]) to which it belongs is called the Star-apple family. Star conner, one who cons, or studies, the stars; an astronomer or an astrologer. --Gascoigne. Star coral (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of stony corals belonging to Astr[ae]a, Orbicella, and allied genera, in which the calicles are round or polygonal and contain conspicuous radiating septa. Star cucumber. (Bot.) See under Cucumber. Star flower. (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Ornithogalum; star-of-Bethlehem. (b) See Starwort (b) . (c) An American plant of the genus Trientalis (Trientalis Americana). --Gray. Star fort (Fort.), a fort surrounded on the exterior with projecting angles; -- whence the name. Star gauge (Ordnance), a long rod, with adjustable points projecting radially at its end, for measuring the size of different parts of the bore of a gun. Star grass. (Bot.) (a) A small grasslike plant (Hypoxis erecta) having star-shaped yellow flowers. (b) The colicroot. See Colicroot. Star hyacinth (Bot.), a bulbous plant of the genus Scilla (S. autumnalis); -- called also star-headed hyacinth. Star jelly (Bot.), any one of several gelatinous plants (Nostoc commune, N. edule, etc.). See Nostoc. Star lizard. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Stellion. Star-of-Bethlehem (Bot.), a bulbous liliaceous plant (Ornithogalum umbellatum) having a small white starlike flower. Star-of-the-earth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Plantago (P. coronopus), growing upon the seashore. Star polygon (Geom.), a polygon whose sides cut each other so as to form a star-shaped figure. Stars and Stripes, a popular name for the flag of the United States, which consists of thirteen horizontal stripes, alternately red and white, and a union having, in a blue field, white stars to represent the several States, one for each. With the old flag, the true American flag, the Eagle, and the Stars and Stripes, waving over the chamber in which we sit. --D. Webster. Star showers. See Shooting star, under Shooting. Star thistle (Bot.), an annual composite plant (Centaurea solstitialis) having the involucre armed with radiating spines. Star wheel (Mach.), a star-shaped disk, used as a kind of ratchet wheel, in repeating watches and the feed motions of some machines. Star worm (Zo["o]l.), a gephyrean. Temporary star (Astron.), a star which appears suddenly, shines for a period, and then nearly or quite disappears. These stars are supposed by some astronometers to be variable stars of long and undetermined periods. Variable star (Astron.), a star whose brilliancy varies periodically, generally with regularity, but sometimes irregularly; -- called periodical star when its changes occur at fixed periods. Water star grass (Bot.), an aquatic plant (Schollera graminea) with small yellow starlike blossoms.
star lizard
Stellion Stel"lion, n. [L. stellio a newt having starlike spots on its back, fr. stella a star.] (Zo["o]l.) A lizard (Stellio vulgaris), common about the Eastern Mediterranean among ruins. In color it is olive-green, shaded with black, with small stellate spots. Called also hardim, and star lizard.
Stump-tailed lizard
Stump-tailed Stump"-tailed`, a. Having a short, thick tail. Stump-tailed lizard (Zo["o]l.), a singular Australian scincoid lizard (Trachydosaurus rugosus) having a short, thick tail resembling its head in form; -- called also sleeping lizard.
Toad lizard
Toad Toad, n. [OE. tode, tade, AS. t[=a]die, t[=a]dige; of unknown origin. Cf. Tadpole.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of batrachians belonging to the genus Bufo and allied genera, especially those of the family Bufonid[ae]. Toads are generally terrestrial in their habits except during the breeding season, when they seek the water. Most of the species burrow beneath the earth in the daytime and come forth to feed on insects at night. Most toads have a rough, warty skin in which are glands that secrete an acrid fluid. Note: The common toad (Bufo vulgaris) and the natterjack are familiar European species. The common American toad (B. lentiginosus) is similar to the European toad, but is less warty and is more active, moving chiefly by leaping. Obstetrical toad. (Zo["o]l.) See under Obstetrical. Surinam toad. (Zo["o]l.) See Pita. Toad lizard (Zo["o]l.), a horned toad. Toad pipe (Bot.), a hollow-stemmed plant (Equisetum limosum) growing in muddy places. --Dr. Prior. Toad rush (Bot.), a low-growing kind of rush (Juncus bufonius). Toad snatcher (Zo["o]l.), the reed bunting. [Prov. Eng.] Toad spittle. (Zo["o]l.) See Cuckoo spit, under Cuckoo. Tree toad. (Zo["o]l.) See under Tree.
Water lizard
Water lizard Wa"ter liz"ard (Zo["o]l.) Any aquatic lizard of the genus Varanus, as the monitor of the Nile. See Monitor, n., 3.

Meaning of Lizard from wikipedia

- Lizards are a widespread group of squamate reptiles, with over 6,000 species, ranging across all continents except Antarctica, as well as most oceanic...
- Coordinates: 50°02′N 5°11′W / 50.033°N 5.183°W / 50.033; -5.183 The Lizard (Cornish: An Lysardh) is a peninsula in southern Cornwall, England, United...
- The Lizard (Curtis "Curt" Connors) is a fictional character, a supervillain appearing in American comic books published by Marvel Comics. The character...
- The monitor lizards are large lizards in the genus Var****. They are native to Africa, Asia and Oceania, but are now found also in the Americas as an...
- King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard is an Australian psychedelic rock band formed in 2010 in Melbourne, Victoria. The band consists of Stu Mackenzie (vocals...
- Horned lizards (Phrynosoma), also known as horny toads or horntoads, are a genus of North American lizards and the type genus of the family Phrynosomatidae...
- gl**** lizards or gl**** snakes are a genus, Ophisaurus (from the Gr**** 'snake-lizard'), of reptiles that resemble snakes, but are actually lizards. Although...
- A lizard is a reptile. Lizard, The Lizard, or Lizards may also refer to: The Lizard, a peninsula in Cornwall, United Kingdom Lizard (village), a village...
- rice lizard, ring lizard, plain lizard and no-mark lizard, as well as simply "water monitor". The water monitor is a large species of monitor lizard. Breeding...
- Lizard Squad is a black hat hacking group, mainly known for their claims of distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks primarily to disrupt gaming-related...
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