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Definition of To

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Alto clef
Alto Al"to, n.; pl. Altos. [It. alto high, fr. L. altus. Cf. Alt.] 1. (Mus.) Formerly the part sung by the highest male, or counter-tenor, voices; now the part sung by the lowest female, or contralto, voices, between in tenor and soprano. In instrumental music it now signifies the tenor. 2. An alto singer. Alto clef (Mus.) the counter-tenor clef, or the C clef, placed so that the two strokes include the middle line of the staff. --Moore.
Alto clef
Clef Clef (kl[e^]f; 277), n. [F. clef key, a key in music, fr. L. clavis key. See Clavicle.] (Mus.) A character used in musical notation to determine the position and pitch of the scale as represented on the staff. Note: The clefs are three in number, called the C, F, and G clefs, and are probably corruptions or modifications of these letters. They indicate that the letters of absolute pitch belonging to the lines upon which they are placed, are respectively C, F, and G. The F or bass clef, and the G or treble clef, are fixed in their positions upon the staff. The C clef may have three positions. It may be placed upon the first or lower line of the staff, in which case it is called soprano clef, upon the third line, in which case it called alto clef, or upon the fourth line, in which case tenor clef. It rarely or never is placed upon the second line, except in ancient music. See other forms of C clef under C, 2. Alto clef, Bass clef. See under Alto, Bass.
alto clef
Counter tenor Coun"ter ten`or (t?n`?r). [OF. contreteneur. Cf. Contratenor, and see Tenor a part in music.] (Mus.) One of the middle parts in music, between the tenor and the treble; high tenor. Counter-tenor clef (Mus.), the C clef when placed on the third line; -- also called alto clef.
Bito tree
Bito Bi"to, n., Bito tree Bi"to tree` . [Etym. uncertain.] (Bot.) A small scrubby tree (Balanites [AE]gyptiaca) growing in dry regions of tropical Africa and Asia. Note: The hard yellowish white wood is made into plows in Abyssinia; the bark is used in Farther India to stupefy fish; the ripe fruit is edible, when green it is an anthelmintic; the fermented juice is used as a beverage; the seeds yield a medicinal oil called zachun. The African name of the tree is hajilij.
Canto fermo
Canto Can"to, n.; pl. Cantos. [It. canto, fr. L. cantus singing, song. See Chant.] 1. One of the chief divisions of a long poem; a book. 2. (Mus.) The highest vocal part; the air or melody in choral music; anciently the tenor, now the soprano. Canto fermo[It.] (Mus.), the plain ecclesiastical chant in cathedral service; the plain song.
Challenge to the array
Challenge Chal"lenge, n. [OE. chalenge claim, accusation, challenge, OF. chalenge, chalonge, claim, accusation, contest, fr. L. calumnia false accusation, chicanery. See Calumny.] 1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons. A challenge to controversy. --Goldsmith. 2. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign. 3. A claim or demand. [Obs.] There must be no challenge of superiority. --Collier. 4. (Hunting) The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. 5. (Law) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. --Blackstone 6. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered. [U. S.] Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.
Challenge to the favor
Challenge Chal"lenge, n. [OE. chalenge claim, accusation, challenge, OF. chalenge, chalonge, claim, accusation, contest, fr. L. calumnia false accusation, chicanery. See Calumny.] 1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons. A challenge to controversy. --Goldsmith. 2. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign. 3. A claim or demand. [Obs.] There must be no challenge of superiority. --Collier. 4. (Hunting) The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. 5. (Law) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. --Blackstone 6. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered. [U. S.] Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.
Challenge to the polls
Challenge Chal"lenge, n. [OE. chalenge claim, accusation, challenge, OF. chalenge, chalonge, claim, accusation, contest, fr. L. calumnia false accusation, chicanery. See Calumny.] 1. An invitation to engage in a contest or controversy of any kind; a defiance; specifically, a summons to fight a duel; also, the letter or message conveying the summons. A challenge to controversy. --Goldsmith. 2. The act of a sentry in halting any one who appears at his post, and demanding the countersign. 3. A claim or demand. [Obs.] There must be no challenge of superiority. --Collier. 4. (Hunting) The opening and crying of hounds at first finding the scent of their game. 5. (Law) An exception to a juror or to a member of a court martial, coupled with a demand that he should be held incompetent to act; the claim of a party that a certain person or persons shall not sit in trial upon him or his cause. --Blackstone 6. An exception to a person as not legally qualified to vote. The challenge must be made when the ballot is offered. [U. S.] Challenge to the array (Law), an exception to the whole panel. Challenge to the favor, the alleging a special cause, the sufficiency of which is to be left to those whose duty and office it is to decide upon it. Challenge to the polls, an exception taken to any one or more of the individual jurors returned. Peremptory challenge, a privilege sometimes allowed to defendants, of challenging a certain number of jurors (fixed by statute in different States) without assigning any cause. Principal challenge, that which the law allows to be sufficient if found to be true.
Colorado potato beetle
Potato Po*ta"to, n.; pl. Potatoes. [Sp. patata potato, batata sweet potato, from the native American name (probably batata) in Hayti.] (Bot.) (a) A plant (Solanum tuberosum) of the Nightshade family, and its esculent farinaceous tuber, of which there are numerous varieties used for food. It is native of South America, but a form of the species is found native as far north as New Mexico. (b) The sweet potato (see below). Potato beetle, Potato bug. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A beetle (Doryphora decemlineata) which feeds, both in the larval and adult stages, upon the leaves of the potato, often doing great damage. Called also Colorado potato beetle, and Doryphora. See Colorado beetle. (b) The Lema trilineata, a smaller and more slender striped beetle which feeds upon the potato plant, bur does less injury than the preceding species. Potato fly (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of blister beetles infesting the potato vine. The black species (Lytta atrata), the striped (L. vittata), and the gray (L. cinerea, or Fabricii) are the most common. See Blister beetle, under Blister. Potato rot, a disease of the tubers of the potato, supposed to be caused by a kind of mold (Peronospora infestans), which is first seen upon the leaves and stems. Potato weevil (Zo["o]l.), an American weevil (Baridius trinotatus) whose larva lives in and kills the stalks of potato vines, often causing serious damage to the crop. Potato whisky, a strong, fiery liquor, having a hot, smoky taste, and rich in amyl alcohol (fusel oil); it is made from potatoes or potato starch. Potato worm (Zo["o]l.), the large green larva of a sphinx, or hawk moth (Macrosila quinquemaculata); -- called also tomato worm. See Illust. under Tomato. Seaside potato (Bot.), Ipom[oe]a Pes-Capr[ae], a kind of morning-glory with rounded and emarginate or bilobed leaves. [West Indies] Sweet potato (Bot.), a climbing plant (Ipom[oe]a Balatas) allied to the morning-glory. Its farinaceous tubers have a sweetish taste, and are used, when cooked, for food. It is probably a native of Brazil, but is cultivated extensively in the warmer parts of every continent, and even as far north as New Jersey. The name potato was applied to this plant before it was to the Solanum tuberosum, and this is the ``potato' of the Southern United States. Wild potato. (Bot.) (a) A vine (Ipom[oe]a pandurata) having a pale purplish flower and an enormous root. It is common in sandy places in the United States. (b) A similar tropical American plant (I. fastigiata) which it is thought may have been the original stock of the sweet potato.
Conclusion to the country
Conclusion Con*clu"sion, n. [F., fr. L. conclusio. See Conclude.] 1. The last part of anything; close; termination; end. A fluorish of trumpets announced the conclusion of the contest. --Prescott. 2. Final decision; determination; result. And the conclusion is, she shall be thine. --Shak. 3. Any inference or result of reasoning. 4. (Logic) The inferred proposition of a syllogism; the necessary consequence of the conditions asserted in two related propositions called premises. See Syllogism. He granted him both the major and minor, but denied him the conclusion. --Addison. 5. Drawing of inferences. [Poetic] Your wife Octavia, with her modest eyes And still conclusion. --Shak. 6. An experiment, or something from which a conclusion may be drawn. [Obs.] We practice likewise all conclusions of grafting and inoculating. --Bacon. 7. (Law) (a) The end or close of a pleading, e.g., the formal ending of an indictment, ``against the peace,' etc. (b) An estoppel or bar by which a person is held to a particular position. --Wharton. Conclusion to the country (Law), the conclusion of a pleading by which a party ``puts himself upon the country,' i.e., appeals to the verdict of a jury. --Mozley & W. In conclusion. (a) Finally. (b) In short. To try conclusions, to make a trial or an experiment. Like the famous ape, To try conclusions, in the basket creep. --Shak. Syn: Inference; deduction; result; consequence; end; decision. See Inference.
Consolato del mare
Consolato del mare Con`so*la"to del ma"re [It., the consulate of the sea.] A collection of maritime laws of disputed origin, supposed to have been first published at Barcelona early in the 14th century. It has formed the basis of most of the subsequent collections of maritime laws. --Kent. --Bouvier.
Demurrer to evidence
Demurrer De*mur"rer, n. 1. One who demurs. 2. (Law) A stop or pause by a party to an action, for the judgment of the court on the question, whether, assuming the truth of the matter alleged by the opposite party, it is sufficient in law to sustain the action or defense, and hence whether the party resting is bound to answer or proceed further. Demurrer to evidence, an exception taken by a party to the evidence offered by the opposite party, and an objecting to proceed further, on the allegation that such evidence is not sufficient in law to maintain the issue, and a reference to the court to determine the point. --Bouvier.
Ex post facto law
Ex post facto law, a law which operates by after enactment. The phrase is popularly applied to any law, civil or criminal, which is enacted with a retrospective effect, and with intention to produce that effect; but in its true application, as employed in American law, it relates only to crimes, and signifies a law which retroacts, by way of criminal punishment, upon that which was not a crime before its passage, or which raises the grade of an offense, or renders an act punishable in a more severe manner that it was when committed. Ex post facto laws are held to be contrary to the fundamental principles of a free government, and the States are prohibited from passing such laws by the Constitution of the United States. --Burrill. --Kent.
Face to face
Cylinder face (Steam Engine), the flat part of a steam cylinder on which a slide valve moves. Face of an anvil, its flat upper surface. Face of a bastion (Fort.), the part between the salient and the shoulder angle. Face of coal (Mining), the principal cleavage plane, at right angles to the stratification. Face of a gun, the surface of metal at the muzzle. Face of a place (Fort.), the front comprehended between the flanked angles of two neighboring bastions. --Wilhelm. Face of a square (Mil.), one of the sides of a battalion when formed in a square. Face of a watch, clock, compass, card etc., the dial or graduated surface on which a pointer indicates the time of day, point of the compass, etc. Face to face. (a) In the presence of each other; as, to bring the accuser and the accused face to face. (b) Without the interposition of any body or substance. ``Now we see through a glass darkly; but then face to face.' 1 --Cor. xiii. 12. (c) With the faces or finished surfaces turned inward or toward one another; vis [`a] vis; -- opposed to back to back. To fly in the face of, to defy; to brave; to withstand. To make a face, to distort the countenance; to make a grimace. --Shak.
Flauto traverso
Flauto Flau"to, n. [It.] A flute. Flaute piccolo[It., little flute], an octave flute. Flauto traverso[It., transverse flute], the German flute, held laterally, instead of being played, like the old fl[^u]te a bec, with a mouth piece at the end.
From pillar to post
Pillar Pil"lar, n. [OE. pilerF. pilier, LL. pilare, pilarium, pilarius, fr. L. pila a pillar. See Pile a heap.] 1. The general and popular term for a firm, upright, insulated support for a superstructure; a pier, column, or post; also, a column or shaft not supporting a superstructure, as one erected for a monument or an ornament. Jacob set a pillar upon her grave. --Gen. xxxv. 20. The place . . . vast and proud, Supported by a hundred pillars stood. --Dryden. 2. Figuratively, that which resembles such a pillar in appearance, character, or office; a supporter or mainstay; as, the Pillars of Hercules; a pillar of the state. ``You are a well-deserving pillar.' --Shak. By day a cloud, by night a pillar of fire. --Milton. 3. (R. C. Ch.) A portable ornamental column, formerly carried before a cardinal, as emblematic of his support to the church. [Obs.] --Skelton. 4. (Man.) The center of the volta, ring, or manege ground, around which a horse turns. From pillar to post, hither and thither; to and fro; from one place or predicament to another; backward and forward. [Colloq.] Pillar saint. See Stylite. Pillars of the fauces. See Fauces, 1.
From stem to stern
Stem Stem, n. [AS. stemn, stefn, st[ae]fn; akin to OS. stamn the stem of a ship, D. stam stem, steven stem of a ship, G. stamm stem, steven stem of a ship, Icel. stafn, stamn, stem of a ship, stofn, stomn, stem, Sw. stam a tree trunk, Dan. stamme. Cf. Staff, Stand.] 1. The principal body of a tree, shrub, or plant, of any kind; the main stock; the part which supports the branches or the head or top. After they are shot up thirty feet in length, they spread a very large top, having no bough nor twig in the trunk or the stem. --Sir W. Raleigh. The lowering spring, with lavish rain, Beats down the slender stem and breaded grain. --Dryden. 2. A little branch which connects a fruit, flower, or leaf with a main branch; a peduncle, pedicel, or petiole; as, the stem of an apple or a cherry. 3. The stock of a family; a race or generation of progenitors. ``All that are of noble stem.' --Milton. While I do pray, learn here thy stem And true descent. --Herbert. 4. A branch of a family. This is a stem Of that victorious stock. --Shak. 5. (Naut.) A curved piece of timber to which the two sides of a ship are united at the fore end. The lower end of it is scarfed to the keel, and the bowsprit rests upon its upper end. Hence, the forward part of a vessel; the bow. 6. Fig.: An advanced or leading position; the lookout. Wolsey sat at the stem more than twenty years. --Fuller. 7. Anything resembling a stem or stalk; as, the stem of a tobacco pipe; the stem of a watch case, or that part to which the ring, by which it is suspended, is attached. 8. (Bot.) That part of a plant which bears leaves, or rudiments of leaves, whether rising above ground or wholly subterranean. 9. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The entire central axis of a feather. (b) The basal portion of the body of one of the Pennatulacea, or of a gorgonian. 10. (Mus.) The short perpendicular line added to the body of a note; the tail of a crotchet, quaver, semiquaver, etc. 11. (Gram.) The part of an inflected word which remains unchanged (except by euphonic variations) throughout a given inflection; theme; base. From stem to stern (Naut.), from one end of the ship to the other, or through the whole length. Stem leaf (Bot.), a leaf growing from the stem of a plant, as contrasted with a basal or radical leaf.
From top to toe
Top Top, n. (Golf) (a) A stroke on the top of the ball. (b) A forward spin given to the ball by hitting it on or near the top. From top to toe, from head to foot; altogether.
into commission
the formal act of taking command of a vessel for service, hoisting the flag, reading the orders, etc. To put a vessel out of commission (Naut.), to detach the officers and crew and retire it from active service, temporarily or permanently. To put the great seal, or the Treasury, into commission, to place it in the hands of a commissioner or commissioners during the abeyance of the ordinary administration, as between the going out of one lord keeper and the accession of another. [Eng.] The United States Christian Commission, an organization among the people of the North, during the Civil War, which afforded material comforts to the Union soldiers, and performed services of a religious character in the field and in hospitals. The United States Sanitary Commission, an organization formed by the people of the North to co["o]perate with and supplement the medical department of the Union armies during the Civil War. Syn: Charge; warrant; authority; mandate; office; trust; employment.
into or through
Millstone Mill"stone`, n. One of two circular stones used for grinding grain or other substance. No man shall take the nether or the upper millstone to pledge. --Deut. xxiv. 6. Note: The cellular siliceous rock called buhrstone is usually employed for millstones; also, some kinds of lava, as that Niedermendig, or other firm rock with rough texture. The surface of a millstone has usually a series of radial grooves in which the powdered material collects. Millstone girt (Geol.), a hard and coarse, gritty sandstone, dividing the Carboniferous from the Subcarboniferous strata. See Farewell rock, under Farewell, a., and Chart of Geology. To see into, or through, a millstone, to see into or through a difficult matter. (Colloq.)
Into the bargain
Bargain Bar"gain, n. [OE. bargayn, bargany, OF. bargaigne, bargagne, prob. from a supposed LL. barcaneum, fr. barca a boat which carries merchandise to the shore; hence, to traffic to and fro, to carry on commerce in general. See Bark a vessel. ] 1. An agreement between parties concerning the sale of property; or a contract by which one party binds himself to transfer the right to some property for a consideration, and the other party binds himself to receive the property and pay the consideration. A contract is a bargain that is legally binding. --Wharton. 2. An agreement or stipulation; mutual pledge. And whon your honors mean to solemnize The bargain of your faith. --Shak. 3. A purchase; also ( when not qualified), a gainful transaction; an advantageous purchase; as, to buy a thing at a bargain. 4. The thing stipulated or purchased; also, anything bought cheap. She was too fond of her most filthy bargain. --Shak. Bargain and sale (Law), a species of conveyance, by which the bargainor contracts to convey the lands to the bargainee, and becomes by such contract a trustee for and seized to the use of the bargainee. The statute then completes the purchase; i. e., the bargain vests the use, and the statute vests the possession. --Blackstone. Into the bargain, over and above what is stipulated; besides. To sell bargains, to make saucy (usually indelicate) repartees. [Obs.] --Swift. To strike a bargain, to reach or ratify an agreement. ``A bargain was struck.' --Macaulay. Syn: Contract; stipulation; purchase; engagement.
Mosquito bar
Mosquito Mos*qui"to, n.; pl. Mosquitoes. [Sp. mosquito, fr. moscafly, L. musca. Cf. Musket.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of various species of gnats of the genus Culex and allied genera. The females have a proboscis containing, within the sheathlike labium, six fine, sharp, needlelike organs with which they puncture the skin of man and animals to suck the blood. These bites, when numerous, cause, in many persons, considerable irritation and swelling, with some pain. The larv[ae] and pup[ae], called wigglers, are aquatic. [Written also musquito.] Mosquito bar, Mosquito net, a net or curtain for excluding mosquitoes, -- used for beds and windows. Mosquito fleet, a fleet of small vessels. Mosquito hawk (Zo["o]l.), a dragon fly; -- so called because it captures and feeds upon mosquitoes. Mosquito netting, a loosely-woven gauzelike fabric for making mosquito bars.
Mosquito fleet
Mosquito Mos*qui"to, n.; pl. Mosquitoes. [Sp. mosquito, fr. moscafly, L. musca. Cf. Musket.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of various species of gnats of the genus Culex and allied genera. The females have a proboscis containing, within the sheathlike labium, six fine, sharp, needlelike organs with which they puncture the skin of man and animals to suck the blood. These bites, when numerous, cause, in many persons, considerable irritation and swelling, with some pain. The larv[ae] and pup[ae], called wigglers, are aquatic. [Written also musquito.] Mosquito bar, Mosquito net, a net or curtain for excluding mosquitoes, -- used for beds and windows. Mosquito fleet, a fleet of small vessels. Mosquito hawk (Zo["o]l.), a dragon fly; -- so called because it captures and feeds upon mosquitoes. Mosquito netting, a loosely-woven gauzelike fabric for making mosquito bars.
Mosquito hawk
Mosquito Mos*qui"to, n.; pl. Mosquitoes. [Sp. mosquito, fr. moscafly, L. musca. Cf. Musket.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of various species of gnats of the genus Culex and allied genera. The females have a proboscis containing, within the sheathlike labium, six fine, sharp, needlelike organs with which they puncture the skin of man and animals to suck the blood. These bites, when numerous, cause, in many persons, considerable irritation and swelling, with some pain. The larv[ae] and pup[ae], called wigglers, are aquatic. [Written also musquito.] Mosquito bar, Mosquito net, a net or curtain for excluding mosquitoes, -- used for beds and windows. Mosquito fleet, a fleet of small vessels. Mosquito hawk (Zo["o]l.), a dragon fly; -- so called because it captures and feeds upon mosquitoes. Mosquito netting, a loosely-woven gauzelike fabric for making mosquito bars.
Mosquito net
Mosquito Mos*qui"to, n.; pl. Mosquitoes. [Sp. mosquito, fr. moscafly, L. musca. Cf. Musket.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of various species of gnats of the genus Culex and allied genera. The females have a proboscis containing, within the sheathlike labium, six fine, sharp, needlelike organs with which they puncture the skin of man and animals to suck the blood. These bites, when numerous, cause, in many persons, considerable irritation and swelling, with some pain. The larv[ae] and pup[ae], called wigglers, are aquatic. [Written also musquito.] Mosquito bar, Mosquito net, a net or curtain for excluding mosquitoes, -- used for beds and windows. Mosquito fleet, a fleet of small vessels. Mosquito hawk (Zo["o]l.), a dragon fly; -- so called because it captures and feeds upon mosquitoes. Mosquito netting, a loosely-woven gauzelike fabric for making mosquito bars.
Mosquito netting
Mosquito Mos*qui"to, n.; pl. Mosquitoes. [Sp. mosquito, fr. moscafly, L. musca. Cf. Musket.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of various species of gnats of the genus Culex and allied genera. The females have a proboscis containing, within the sheathlike labium, six fine, sharp, needlelike organs with which they puncture the skin of man and animals to suck the blood. These bites, when numerous, cause, in many persons, considerable irritation and swelling, with some pain. The larv[ae] and pup[ae], called wigglers, are aquatic. [Written also musquito.] Mosquito bar, Mosquito net, a net or curtain for excluding mosquitoes, -- used for beds and windows. Mosquito fleet, a fleet of small vessels. Mosquito hawk (Zo["o]l.), a dragon fly; -- so called because it captures and feeds upon mosquitoes. Mosquito netting, a loosely-woven gauzelike fabric for making mosquito bars.
Not to care a rap
Not to care a rap, to care nothing. Not worth a rap, worth nothing.
Otto cycle
Otto cycle Ot"to cy`cle (Thermodynamics) A four-stroke cycle for internal-combustion engines consisting of the following operations: First stroke, suction into cylinder of explosive charge, as of gas and air; second stroke, compression, ignition, and explosion of this charge; third stroke (the working stroke), expansion of the gases; fourth stroke, expulsion of the products of combustion from the cylinder. This is the cycle invented by Beau de Rochas in 1862 and applied by Dr. Otto in 1877 in the Otto-Crossley gas engine, the first commercially successful internal-combustion engine made.
Otto engine
Otto engine Otto engine An engine using the Otto cycle.
Palmetto flag
Palmetto flag Pal*met"to flag Any of several flags adopted by South California after its secession. That adopted in November, 1860, had a green cabbage palmetto in the center of a white field; the final one, January, 1861, had a white palmetto in the center of a blue field and a white crescent in the upper left-hand corner.

Meaning of To from wikipedia

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