Definition of Staff. Meaning of Staff. Synonyms of Staff

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Staff. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Staff and, of course, Staff synonyms and on the right images related to the word Staff.

Definition of Staff

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Backstaff
Backstaff Back"staff`, n. An instrument formerly used for taking the altitude of the heavenly bodies, but now superseded by the quadrant and sextant; -- so called because the observer turned his back to the body observed.
batling staff
Batlet Bat"let, n. [Bat stick + -let.] A short bat for beating clothes in washing them; -- called also batler, batling staff, batting staff. --Shak.
batting staff
Batlet Bat"let, n. [Bat stick + -let.] A short bat for beating clothes in washing them; -- called also batler, batling staff, batting staff. --Shak.
Bedstaff
Bedstaff Bed"staff`, n.; pl. Bedstaves. ``A wooden pin stuck anciently on the sides of the bedstead, to hold the clothes from slipping on either side.' --Johnson. Hostess, accommodate us with a bedstaff. --B. Jonson. Say there is no virtue in cudgels and bedstaves. --Brome.
Broomstaff
Broomstaff Broom"staff`, n. A broomstick. [Obs.] --Shak.
Cantoral staff
Cantoral Can"tor*al, a. Of or belonging to a cantor. Cantoral staff, the official staff or baton of a cantor or precentor, with which time is marked for the singers.
Colestaff
Colestaff Cole"staff`, n. See Colstaff.
Colstaff
Colstaff Col"staff`, n. [F. col neck + E. staff. Cf. Coll.] A staff by means of which a burden is borne by two persons on their shoulders.
Cowlstaff
Cowlstaff Cowl"staff` (koul"st?f`), n. [Cowl a vessel + staff.] A staff or pole on which a vessel is supported between two persons. --Suckling.
cross-staff
Forestaff Fore"staff`, n. (Naut.) An instrument formerly used at sea for taking the altitudes of heavenly bodies, now superseded by the sextant; -- called also cross-staff. --Brande & C.
Flagstaff
Flagstaff Flag"staff`, n.; pl. -stavesor -staffs. A staff on which a flag is hoisted.
Forestaff
Forestaff Fore"staff`, n. (Naut.) An instrument formerly used at sea for taking the altitudes of heavenly bodies, now superseded by the sextant; -- called also cross-staff. --Brande & C.
Gibstaff
Gibstaff Gib"staff`, n. [Prov. E. gib a hooked stick + E. staff.] 1. A staff to guage water, or to push a boat. 2. A staff formerly used in fighting beasts on the stage. [Obs.] --Bailey.
Object staff
Object, beside its proper signification, came to be abusively applied to denote motive, end, final cause . . . . This innovation was probably borrowed from the French. --Sir. W. Hamilton. Let our object be, our country, our whole country, and nothing but our country. --D. Webster. 4. Sight; show; appearance; aspect. [Obs.] --Shak. He, advancing close Up to the lake, past all the rest, arose In glorious object. --Chapman. 5. (Gram.) A word, phrase, or clause toward which an action is directed, or is considered to be directed; as, the object of a transitive verb. Object glass, the lens, or system of lenses, placed at the end of a telescope, microscope, etc., which is toward the object. Its office is to form an image of the object, which is then viewed by the eyepiece. Called also objective. See Illust. of Microscope. Object lesson, a lesson in which object teaching is made use of. Object staff. (Leveling) Same as Leveling staff. Object teaching, a method of instruction, in which illustrative objects are employed, each new word or idea being accompanied by a representation of that which it signifies; -- used especially in the kindergarten, for young children.
Offset staff
Offset Off"set`, n. [Off + set. Cf. Set-off.] In general, that which is set off, from, before, or against, something; as: 1. (Bot.) A short prostrate shoot, which takes root and produces a tuft of leaves, etc. See Illust. of Houseleek. 2. A sum, account, or value set off against another sum or account, as an equivalent; hence, anything which is given in exchange or retaliation; a set-off. 3. A spur from a range of hills or mountains. 4. (Arch.) A horizontal ledge on the face of a wall, formed by a diminution of its thickness, or by the weathering or upper surface of a part built out from it; -- called also set-off. 5. (Surv.) A short distance measured at right angles from a line actually run to some point in an irregular boundary, or to some object. 6. (Mech.) An abrupt bend in an object, as a rod, by which one part is turned aside out of line, but nearly parallel, with the rest; the part thus bent aside. 7. (Print.) A more or less distinct transfer of a printed page or picture to the opposite page, when the pages are pressed together before the ink is dry or when it is poor. Offset staff (Surv.), a rod, usually ten links long, used in measuring offsets.
Proof staff
Proof charge (Firearms), a charge of powder and ball, greater than the service charge, fired in an arm, as a gun or cannon, to test its strength. Proof impression. See under Impression. Proof load (Engin.), the greatest load than can be applied to a piece, as a beam, column, etc., without straining the piece beyond the elastic limit. Proof sheet. See Proof, n., 5. Proof spirit (Chem.), a strong distilled liquor, or mixture of alcohol and water, containing not less than a standard amount of alcohol. In the United States ``proof spirit is defined by law to be that mixture of alcohol and water which contains one half of its volume of alcohol, the alcohol when at a temperature of 60[deg] Fahrenheit being of specific gravity 0.7939 referred to water at its maximum density as unity. Proof spirit has at 60[deg] Fahrenheit a specific gravity of 0.93353, 100 parts by volume of the same consisting of 50 parts of absolute alcohol and 53.71 parts of water,' the apparent excess of water being due to contraction of the liquids on mixture. In England proof spirit is defined by Act 58, George III., to be such as shall at a temperature of 51[deg] Fahrenheit weigh exactly the 12/13 part of an equal measure of distilled water. This contains 49.3 per cent by weight, or 57.09 by volume, of alcohol. Stronger spirits, as those of about 60, 70, and 80 per cent of alcohol, are sometimes called second, third, and fourth proof spirits respectively. Proof staff, a straight-edge used by millers to test the flatness of a stone. Proof stick (Sugar Manuf.), a rod in the side of a vacuum pan, for testing the consistency of the sirup. Proof text, a passage of Scripture used to prove a doctrine.
Quarterstaff
Quarterstaff Quar"ter*staff`, n.; pl. Quarterstaves. A long and stout staff formerly used as a weapon of defense and offense; -- so called because in holding it one hand was placed in the middle, and the other between the middle and the end.
Rock staff
Rock staff Rock" staff` [Cf. Rock, v. i.] An oscillating bar in a machine, as the lever of the bellows of a forge.
Runic staff
Runic Ru"nic, a. Of or pertaining to a rune, to runes, or to the Norsemen; as, runic verses; runic letters; runic names; runic rhyme. Runic staff. See Clog almanac, under Clog. Runic wand, a willow wand bearing runes, formerly thought to have been used by the heathen tribes of Northern Europe in magical ceremonies.
Runic staff
Clog Clog, n. [OE. clogge clog, Scot. clag, n., a clot, v., to to obstruct, cover with mud or anything adhesive; prob. of the same origin as E. clay.] 1. That which hinders or impedes motion; hence, an encumbrance, restraint, or impediment, of any kind. All the ancient, honest, juridical principles and institutions of England are so many clogs to check and retard the headlong course of violence and opression. --Burke. 2. A weight, as a log or block of wood, attached to a man or an animal to hinder motion. As a dog . . . but chance breaks loose, And quits his clog. --Hudibras. A clog of lead was round my feet. --Tennyson. 3. A shoe, or sandal, intended to protect the feet from wet, or to increase the apparent stature, and having, therefore, a very thick sole. Cf. Chopine. In France the peasantry goes barefoot; and the middle sort . . . makes use of wooden clogs. --Harvey. Clog almanac, a primitive kind of almanac or calendar, formerly used in England, made by cutting notches and figures on the four edges of a clog, or square piece of wood, brass, or bone; -- called also a Runic staff, from the Runic characters used in the numerical notation. Clog dance, a dance performed by a person wearing clogs, or thick-soled shoes. Clog dancer.
Staffier
Staffier Staf"fi*er, n. An attendant bearing a staff. [Obs.] ``Staffiers on foot.' --Hudibras.
Staffish
Staffish Staff"ish, a. Stiff; harsh. [Obs.] --Ascham.
Staffman
Staffman Staff"man, n.; pl. Staffmen. A workman employed in silk throwing.
Staffmen
Staffman Staff"man, n.; pl. Staffmen. A workman employed in silk throwing.
-staffs
Flagstaff Flag"staff`, n.; pl. -stavesor -staffs. A staff on which a flag is hoisted.
swingling staff
Swingle Swin"gle, n. A wooden instrument like a large knife, about two feet long, with one thin edge, used for beating and cleaning flax; a scutcher; -- called also swingling knife, swingling staff, and swingling wand.
Tipstaff
Tipstaff Tip"staff`, n.; pl. Tipstaff. 1. A staff tipped with metal. --Bacon. 2. An officer who bears a staff tipped with metal; a constable. --Macaulay.
Tipstaff
Tipstaff Tip"staff`, n.; pl. Tipstaff. 1. A staff tipped with metal. --Bacon. 2. An officer who bears a staff tipped with metal; a constable. --Macaulay.
Vane of a leveling staff
1. A contrivance attached to some elevated object for the purpose of showing which way the wind blows; a weathercock. It is usually a plate or strip of metal, or slip of wood, often cut into some fanciful form, and placed upon a perpendicular axis around which it moves freely. Aye undiscreet, and changing as a vane. --Chaucer. 2. Any flat, extended surface attached to an axis and moved by the wind; as, the vane of a windmill; hence, a similar fixture of any form moved in or by water, air, or other fluid; as, the vane of a screw propeller, a fan blower, an anemometer, etc. 3. (Zo["o]l.) The rhachis and web of a feather taken together. 4. One of the sights of a compass, quadrant, etc. Vane of a leveling staff. (Surv.) Same as Target, 3.
Whipstaff
Whipstaff Whip"staff`, n. (Naut.) A bar attached to the tiller, for convenience in steering.

Meaning of Staff from wikipedia

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- characters are staff members and denizens of Hogwarts in the Harry Potter books written by J. K. Rowling. The following are notable teachers and staff members...
- Staff, Joint Staff, the Vice Chief of Staff, Joint Staff, an Administrative Vice Chief of Staff, as well as numerous departments and special staffs....
- Staffing is the process of hiring, positioning and overseeing employees in an organisation. Human resources Recruitment H****n III, Herbert; Judge, Timothy...
- Staff sergeant is a rank of non-commissioned officer used in the armed forces of several countries. It is also a police rank in some police services....
- In Western musical notation, the stave (UK) or staff (US) (plural for either: staves) is a set of five horizontal lines and four spaces that each represent...
- Kathy Staff (born Minnie Higginbottom; 12 July 1928 – 13 December 2008) was an English actress known for her work on British television. She is best known...
- of the General Staff (Russian: Начальник Генерального штаба, romanized: Nachal'nik General'nogo shtaba) is the chief of the General Staff of the Russian...
- The White House Chief of Staff position is the successor to the earlier role of the President's private secretary. The role was formalized as the ****istant...
- of the Defence Staff may refer to: Chief of the Defence Staff (Canada) Chief of the Defence Staff (France) Chief of the Defence Staff (The Gambia) Chief...
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