Definition of Roadbed. Meaning of Roadbed. Synonyms of Roadbed

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Roadbed. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Roadbed and, of course, Roadbed synonyms and on the right images related to the word Roadbed.

Definition of Roadbed

Roadbed
Roadbed Road"bed`, n. In railroads, the bed or foundation on which the superstructure (ties, rails, etc.) rests; in common roads, the whole material laid in place and ready for travel.

Meaning of Roadbed from wikipedia

- construction requires the creation of an engineered continuous right-of-way or roadbed, overcoming geographic obstacles and having grades low enough to permit...
- driver would follow the road straight at first, then follow the original roadbed as it curves to the right, avoiding the 90-degree intersection ahead. This...
- inside of the turn. For a road or railroad this is usually due to the roadbed having a transverse down-slope towards the inside of the curve. The bank...
- as needed, doubling or tripling the supportive side panels, or on the roadbed sections. The basic bridge consists of three main parts. The bridge's strength...
- roadbed in S****afras Gap don't recognize it as a road, but it is easily recognized because of the short section of steps going down into the roadbed,...
- The location at which the former roadbed of Pennsylvania Route 61 terminates due to the mine fire....
- track is "roadbed" style, with integrated ballast, or without roadbed as “fine scale”. “Fine scale” track is available in Track without roadbed is available...
- is 5,780 feet (1,760 m).: 9  As built, the Bayonne Bridge contained a roadbed 1,675 feet (511 m) long without intermediary piers. The main span was connected...
- built. The truss may carry its roadbed on top, in the middle, or at the bottom of the truss. Bridges with the roadbed at the top or the bottom are the...
- of track, reaching Fremont, Nebraska, and a further 10 miles (16 km) of roadbed. At the end of 1865, Peter A. Dey, Chief Engineer of the Union Pacific...