Definition of Geographic. Meaning of Geographic. Synonyms of Geographic

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Geographic. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Geographic and, of course, Geographic synonyms and on the right images related to the word Geographic.

Definition of Geographic

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Anthropogeographical
Anthropogeography An`thro*po*ge*og"ra*phy, n. [Gr. ? man + geography.] The science of the human species as to geographical distribution and environment. Broadly, it includes industrial, commercial, and political geography, and that part of ethnology which deals with distribution and physical environment. -- An`thro*po*ge*og"ra*pher, n. -- An`thro*po*ge`o*graph"ic*al, a.
Biogeographic
Biogeography Bi`o*ge*og"ra*phy, n. [Gr. bi`os life + E. geography.] The branch of biology which deals with the geographical distribution of animals and plants. It includes both zo["o]geography and phytogeography. -- Bi`o*ge`o*graph"ic, a. -- Bi`o*ge`o*graph"ic*al*ly, adv.
Biogeographically
Biogeography Bi`o*ge*og"ra*phy, n. [Gr. bi`os life + E. geography.] The branch of biology which deals with the geographical distribution of animals and plants. It includes both zo["o]geography and phytogeography. -- Bi`o*ge`o*graph"ic, a. -- Bi`o*ge`o*graph"ic*al*ly, adv.
Geographical
Mile Mile, n. [AS. m[=i]l, fr. L. millia, milia; pl. of mille a thousand, i. e., milia passuum a thousand paces. Cf. Mill the tenth of a cent, Million.] A certain measure of distance, being equivalent in England and the United States to 320 poles or rods, or 5,280 feet. Note: The distance called a mile varies greatly in different countries. Its length in yards is, in Norway, 12,182; in Brunswick, 11,816; in Sweden, 11,660; in Hungary, 9,139; in Switzerland, 8,548; in Austria, 8,297; in Prussia, 8,238; in Poland, 8,100; in Italy, 2,025; in England and the United States, 1,760; in Spain, 1,552; in the Netherlands, 1,094. Geographical, or Nautical mile, one sixtieth of a degree of a great circle of the earth, or 6080.27 feet. Mile run. Same as Train mile. See under Train. Roman mile, a thousand paces, equal to 1,614 yards English measure. Statute mile, a mile conforming to statute, that is, in England and the United States, a mile of 5,280 feet, as distinguished from any other mile.
Geographical coordinates
Note: Co["o]rdinates are of several kinds, consisting in some of the different cases, of the following elements, namely: (a) (Geom. of Two Dimensions) The abscissa and ordinate of any point, taken together; as the abscissa PY and ordinate PX of the point P (Fig. 2, referred to the co["o]rdinate axes AY and AX. (b) Any radius vector PA (Fig. 1), together with its angle of inclination to a fixed line, APX, by which any point A in the same plane is referred to that fixed line, and a fixed point in it, called the pole, P. (c) (Geom. of Three Dimensions) Any three lines, or distances, PB, PC, PD (Fig. 3), taken parallel to three co["o]rdinate axes, AX, AY, AZ, and measured from the corresponding co["o]rdinate fixed planes, YAZ, XAZ, XAY, to any point in space, P, whose position is thereby determined with respect to these planes and axes. (d) A radius vector, the angle which it makes with a fixed plane, and the angle which its projection on the plane makes with a fixed line line in the plane, by which means any point in space at the free extremity of the radius vector is referred to that fixed plane and fixed line, and a fixed point in that line, the pole of the radius vector. Cartesian co["o]rdinates. See under Cartesian. Geographical co["o]rdinates, the latitude and longitude of a place, by which its relative situation on the globe is known. The height of the above the sea level constitutes a third co["o]rdinate. Polar co["o]rdinates, co["o]rdinates made up of a radius vector and its angle of inclination to another line, or a line and plane; as those defined in (b) and (d) above. Rectangular co["o]rdinates, co["o]rdinates the axes of which intersect at right angles. Rectilinear co["o]rdinates, co["o]rdinates made up of right lines. Those defined in (a) and (c) above are called also Cartesian co["o]rdinates. Trigonometrical or Spherical co["o]rdinates, elements of reference, by means of which the position of a point on the surface of a sphere may be determined with respect to two great circles of the sphere. Trilinear co["o]rdinates, co["o]rdinates of a point in a plane, consisting of the three ratios which the three distances of the point from three fixed lines have one to another.
Geographical distribution
Distribution Dis`tri*bu"tion, n. [L. distributio: cf. F. distribution.] 1. The act of distributing or dispensing; the act of dividing or apportioning among several or many; apportionment; as, the distribution of an estate among heirs or children. The phenomena of geological distribution are exactly analogous to those of geography. --A. R. Wallace. 2. Separation into parts or classes; arrangement of anything into parts; disposition; classification. 3. That which is distributed. ``Our charitable distributions.' --Atterbury. 4. (Logic) A resolving a whole into its parts. 5. (Print.) The sorting of types and placing them in their proper boxes in the cases. 6. (Steam Engine) The steps or operations by which steam is supplied to and withdrawn from the cylinder at each stroke of the piston; viz., admission, suppression or cutting off, release or exhaust, and compression of exhaust steam prior to the next admission. Geographical distribution, the natural arrangements of animals and plants in particular regions or districts. Syn: Apportionments; allotment; dispensation; disposal; dispersion; classification; arrangement.
Geographically
Geographically Ge`o*graph"ic*al*ly, adv. In a geographical manner or method; according to geography.
Phytogeographical
Phytogeographical Phy`to*ge"o*graph"ic*al, a. Of or pertaining to phytogeography.
Zoogeographical
Zoogeographical o`["o]*ge`o*graph"ic*al, a. Of or pertaining to zo["o]graphy.

Meaning of Geographic from wikipedia

- the quantitative revolution in geography in the mid-1950s. Today, geomatics methods include spatial analysis, geographic information systems (GIS), remote...
- A geographic coordinate system is a coordinate system used in geography that enables every location on Earth to be specified by a set of numbers, letters...
- National Geographic (formerly the National Geographic Magazine and branded also as NAT GEO) is the official magazine of the National Geographic Society...
- A geographic information system (GIS) is a system designed to capture, store, mani****te, analyze, manage, and present spatial or geographic data. GIS...
- with geographic tongue, and some consider fissured tongue to be an end stage of geographic tongue. In the past, some research suggested that geographic tongue...
- in 1887. The National Geographic Society was founded in the United States in 1888 and began publication of the National Geographic magazine which became...
- National Geographic (formerly National Geographic Channel and also commercially abbreviated and trademarked as Nat Geo or Nat Geo TV) is an American digital...
- other media operations. The National Geographic Society was founded in 1888 "to increase and diffuse geographic knowledge." It is governed by a board...
- for the names of countries, dependent territories, special areas of geographical interest, and their prin****l subdivisions (e.g., provinces or states)...
- typically 100 or 500 feet (30 or 152 m). At one time the U.S. Board on Geographic Names defined a mountain as being 1,000 feet (300 m) or taller, but has...
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