Definition of Parallels. Meaning of Parallels. Synonyms of Parallels

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Definition of Parallels

Parallels
Parallel Par"al*lel, a. [F. parall[`e]le, L. parallelus, fr. Gr. ?; ? beside + ? of one another, fr. ? other, akin to L. alius. See Allien.] 1. (Geom.) Extended in the same direction, and in all parts equally distant; as, parallel lines; parallel planes. Revolutions . . . parallel to the equinoctial. --Hakluyt. Note: Curved lines or curved planes are said to be parallel when they are in all parts equally distant. 2. Having the same direction or tendency; running side by side; being in accordance (with); tending to the same result; -- used with to and with. When honor runs parallel with the laws of God and our country, it can not be too much cherished. --Addison. 3. Continuing a resemblance through many particulars; applicable in all essential parts; like; similar; as, a parallel case; a parallel passage. --Addison. Parallel bar. (a) (Steam Eng.) A rod in a parallel motion which is parallel with the working beam. (b) One of a pair of bars raised about five feet above the floor or ground, and parallel to each other, -- used for gymnastic exercises. Parallel circles of a sphere, those circles of the sphere whose planes are parallel to each other. Parallel columns, or Parallels (Printing), two or more passages of reading matter printed side by side, for the purpose of emphasizing the similarity or discrepancy between them. Parallel forces (Mech.), forces which act in directions parallel to each other. Parallel motion. (a) (Mach.) A jointed system of links, rods, or bars, by which the motion of a reciprocating piece, as a piston rod, may be guided, either approximately or exactly in a straight line. --Rankine. (b) (Mus.) The ascending or descending of two or more parts at fixed intervals, as thirds or sixths. Parallel rod (Locomotive Eng.), a metal rod that connects the crank pins of two or more driving wheels; -- called also couping rod, in distinction from the connecting rod. See Illust. of Locomotive, in App. -- Parallel ruler, an instrument for drawing parallel lines, so constructed as to have the successive positions of the ruling edge parallel to each other; also, one consisting of two movable parts, the opposite edges of which are always parallel. Parallel sailing (Naut.), sailing on a parallel of latitude. Parallel sphere (Astron. & Geog.), that position of the sphere in which the circles of daily motion are parallel to the horizon, as to an observer at either pole. Parallel vise, a vise having jaws so guided as to remain parallel in all positions.
Parallel
Parallel Par"al*lel, n. (Elec.) That arrangement of an electrical system in which all positive poles, electrodes, terminals, etc., are joined to one conductor, and all negative poles, etc., to another conductor; -- called also multiple. Opposed to series. Note: Parts of a system so arranged are said to be in parallel or in multiple.
Parallel
Parallel Par"al*lel, a. [F. parall[`e]le, L. parallelus, fr. Gr. ?; ? beside + ? of one another, fr. ? other, akin to L. alius. See Allien.] 1. (Geom.) Extended in the same direction, and in all parts equally distant; as, parallel lines; parallel planes. Revolutions . . . parallel to the equinoctial. --Hakluyt. Note: Curved lines or curved planes are said to be parallel when they are in all parts equally distant. 2. Having the same direction or tendency; running side by side; being in accordance (with); tending to the same result; -- used with to and with. When honor runs parallel with the laws of God and our country, it can not be too much cherished. --Addison. 3. Continuing a resemblance through many particulars; applicable in all essential parts; like; similar; as, a parallel case; a parallel passage. --Addison. Parallel bar. (a) (Steam Eng.) A rod in a parallel motion which is parallel with the working beam. (b) One of a pair of bars raised about five feet above the floor or ground, and parallel to each other, -- used for gymnastic exercises. Parallel circles of a sphere, those circles of the sphere whose planes are parallel to each other. Parallel columns, or Parallels (Printing), two or more passages of reading matter printed side by side, for the purpose of emphasizing the similarity or discrepancy between them. Parallel forces (Mech.), forces which act in directions parallel to each other. Parallel motion. (a) (Mach.) A jointed system of links, rods, or bars, by which the motion of a reciprocating piece, as a piston rod, may be guided, either approximately or exactly in a straight line. --Rankine. (b) (Mus.) The ascending or descending of two or more parts at fixed intervals, as thirds or sixths. Parallel rod (Locomotive Eng.), a metal rod that connects the crank pins of two or more driving wheels; -- called also couping rod, in distinction from the connecting rod. See Illust. of Locomotive, in App. -- Parallel ruler, an instrument for drawing parallel lines, so constructed as to have the successive positions of the ruling edge parallel to each other; also, one consisting of two movable parts, the opposite edges of which are always parallel. Parallel sailing (Naut.), sailing on a parallel of latitude. Parallel sphere (Astron. & Geog.), that position of the sphere in which the circles of daily motion are parallel to the horizon, as to an observer at either pole. Parallel vise, a vise having jaws so guided as to remain parallel in all positions.
Parallel
Parallel Par"al*lel, v. i. To be parallel; to correspond; to be like. [Obs.] --Bacon.
Parallel
Parallel Par"al*lel, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Paralleled; p. pr. & vb. n. Paralleling.] 1. To place or set so as to be parallel; to place so as to be parallel to, or to conform in direction with, something else. The needle . . . doth parallel and place itself upon the true meridian. --Sir T. Browne. 2. Fig.: To make to conform to something else in character, motive, aim, or the like. His life is paralleled Even with the stroke and line of his great justice. --Shak. 3. To equal; to match; to correspond to. --Shak. 4. To produce or adduce as a parallel. [R.] --Locke. My young remembrance can not parallel A fellow to it. --Shak.

Meaning of Parallels from wikipedia

- Parallels may refer to: Circle of latitude (often called parallels), imaginary east-west circles connecting all locations that share a given latitude "Parallels"...
- of Parallels was more or less kept under wraps until January 2004, two years before Parallels became mainstream. In 2004 SWsoft acquired Parallels, Inc...
- Parallels Desktop for Mac, by Parallels, is software providing hardware virtualization for Macintosh computers with Intel processors. Parallels, Inc....
- Studio Movie 'Parallels'". Video Ink. Archived from the original on 2018-06-17. Brooks, Summer (March 16, 2015). "Reviewing Parallels". Slice of SciFi...
- Parallels Workstation is the first commercial software product released by Parallels, Inc., a developer of desktop and server virtualization software....
- Slagelexecutive production "Fates Warning "Parallels"". Metal Blade Records. Retrieved 2015-10-29. "Parallels - Fates Warning | Awards". AllMusic. All Media...
- running programs in parallel Parallel Sysplex, a cluster of IBM mainframes Parallel communication Parallel port Parallel ATA Parallel circuits, as opposed...
- at a given latitude. Circles of latitude are often called Parallels because they are parallel to each other; that is, any two circles are always the same...
- York: Pocket Books. ISBN 9780671042998. "Parallels" on IMDb "Parallels" at TV.com Parallels at Memory Alpha (a Star Trek wiki) Parallels at StarTrek.com...
- Parallels is a synthpop band from Toronto, Canada, lead by Holly Dodson (vocalist, composer, producer). Parallels was created by Holly Dodson and Cameron...
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