Definition of Mistry. Meaning of Mistry. Synonyms of Mistry

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Definition of Mistry

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Actino-chemistry
Actino-chemistry Ac`ti*no-chem"is*try, n. Chemistry in its relations to actinism. --Draper.
Alchemistry
Alchemistry Al"che*mis*try, n. Alchemy. [Obs.]
Applied chemistry
Apply Ap*ply", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Applied; p. pr. & vb. n. Applying.] [OF. aplier, F. appliquer, fr. L. applicare to join, fix, or attach to; ad + plicare to fold, to twist together. See Applicant, Ply.] 1. To lay or place; to put or adjust (one thing to another); -- with to; as, to apply the hand to the breast; to apply medicaments to a diseased part of the body. He said, and the sword his throat applied. --Dryden. 2. To put to use; to use or employ for a particular purpose, or in a particular case; to appropriate; to devote; as, to apply money to the payment of a debt. 3. To make use of, declare, or pronounce, as suitable, fitting, or relative; as, to apply the testimony to the case; to apply an epithet to a person. Yet God at last To Satan, first in sin, his doom applied. --Milton. 4. To fix closely; to engage and employ diligently, or with attention; to attach; to incline. Apply thine heart unto instruction. --Prov. xxiii. 12. 5. To direct or address. [R.] Sacred vows . . . applied to grisly Pluto. --Pope. 6. To betake; to address; to refer; -- used reflexively. I applied myself to him for help. --Johnson. 7. To busy; to keep at work; to ply. [Obs.] She was skillful in applying his ``humors.' --Sir P. Sidney. 8. To visit. [Obs.] And he applied each place so fast. --Chapman. Applied chemistry. See under Chemistry. Applied mathematics. See under Mathematics.
Applied chemistry
Chemistry Chem"is*try (k[e^]m"[i^]s*tr[y^]; 277), n. [From Chemist. See Alchemy.] 1. That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule. Note: Historically, chemistry is an outgrowth of alchemy (or alchemistry), with which it was anciently identified. 2. An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo. 3. A treatise on chemistry. Note: This word and its derivatives were formerly written with y, and sometimes with i, instead of e, in the first syllable, chymistry, chymist, chymical, etc., or chimistry, chimist, chimical, etc.; and the pronunciation was conformed to the orthography. Inorganic chemistry, that which treats of inorganic or mineral substances. Organic chemistry, that which treats of the substances which form the structure of organized beings and their products, whether animal or vegetable; -- called also chemistry of the carbon compounds. There is no fundamental difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. Physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the organs and tissues of the body, and of the various physiological processes incident to life. Practical chemistry, or Applied chemistry, that which treats of the modes of manufacturing the products of chemistry that are useful in the arts, of their applications to economical purposes, and of the conditions essential to their best use. Pure chemistry, the consideration of the facts and theories of chemistry in their purely scientific relations, without necessary reference to their practical applications or mere utility.
Biochemistry
Biochemistry Bi`o*chem"is*try, n. [Gr. ? life + E. chemistry.] (Biol.) The chemistry of living organisms; the chemistry of the processes incidental to, and characteristic of, life.
chemistry
10. (Mus.) (a) Produced by natural organs, as those of the human throat, in distinction from instrumental music. (b) Of or pertaining to a key which has neither a flat nor a sharp for its signature, as the key of C major. (c) Applied to an air or modulation of harmony which moves by easy and smooth transitions, digressing but little from the original key. --Moore (Encyc. of Music). Natural day, the space of twenty-four hours. --Chaucer. Natural fats, Natural gas, etc. See under Fat, Gas. etc. Natural Harmony (Mus.), the harmony of the triad or common chord. Natural history, in its broadest sense, a history or description of nature as a whole, incuding the sciences of botany, zo["o]logy, geology, mineralogy, paleontology, chemistry, and physics. In recent usage the term is often restricted to the sciences of botany and zo["o]logy collectively, and sometimes to the science of zoology alone. Natural law, that instinctive sense of justice and of right and wrong, which is native in mankind, as distinguished from specifically revealed divine law, and formulated human law. Natural modulation (Mus.), transition from one key to its relative keys. Natural order. (Nat. Hist.) See under order. Natural person. (Law) See under person, n. Natural philosophy, originally, the study of nature in general; in modern usage, that branch of physical science, commonly called physics, which treats of the phenomena and laws of matter and considers those effects only which are unaccompanied by any change of a chemical nature; -- contrasted with mental and moral philosophy. Natural scale (Mus.), a scale which is written without flats or sharps. Model would be a preferable term, as less likely to mislead, the so-called artificial scales (scales represented by the use of flats and sharps) being equally natural with the so-called natural scale Natural science, natural history, in its broadest sense; -- used especially in contradistinction to mental or moral science. Natural selection (Biol.), a supposed operation of natural laws analogous, in its operation and results, to designed selection in breeding plants and animals, and resulting in the survival of the fittest. The theory of natural selection supposes that this has been brought about mainly by gradual changes of environment which have led to corresponding changes of structure, and that those forms which have become so modified as to be best adapted to the changed environment have tended to survive and leave similarly adapted descendants, while those less perfectly adapted have tended to die out though lack of fitness for the environment, thus resulting in the survival of the fittest. See Darwinism. Natural system (Bot. & Zo["o]l.), a classification based upon real affinities, as shown in the structure of all parts of the organisms, and by their embryology. It should be borne in mind that the natural system of botany is natural only in the constitution of its genera, tribes, orders, etc., and in its grand divisions. --Gray. Natural theology, or Natural religion, that part of theological science which treats of those evidences of the existence and attributes of the Supreme Being which are exhibited in nature; -- distinguished from revealed religion. See Quotation under Natural, a., 3. Natural vowel, the vowel sound heard in urn, furl, sir, her, etc.; -- so called as being uttered in the easiest open position of the mouth organs. See Neutral vowel, under Neutral and Guide to Pronunciation, [sect] 17. Syn: See Native.
Chemistry
Chemistry Chem"is*try (k[e^]m"[i^]s*tr[y^]; 277), n. [From Chemist. See Alchemy.] 1. That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule. Note: Historically, chemistry is an outgrowth of alchemy (or alchemistry), with which it was anciently identified. 2. An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo. 3. A treatise on chemistry. Note: This word and its derivatives were formerly written with y, and sometimes with i, instead of e, in the first syllable, chymistry, chymist, chymical, etc., or chimistry, chimist, chimical, etc.; and the pronunciation was conformed to the orthography. Inorganic chemistry, that which treats of inorganic or mineral substances. Organic chemistry, that which treats of the substances which form the structure of organized beings and their products, whether animal or vegetable; -- called also chemistry of the carbon compounds. There is no fundamental difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. Physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the organs and tissues of the body, and of the various physiological processes incident to life. Practical chemistry, or Applied chemistry, that which treats of the modes of manufacturing the products of chemistry that are useful in the arts, of their applications to economical purposes, and of the conditions essential to their best use. Pure chemistry, the consideration of the facts and theories of chemistry in their purely scientific relations, without necessary reference to their practical applications or mere utility.
chemistry of the carbon compounds
Chemistry Chem"is*try (k[e^]m"[i^]s*tr[y^]; 277), n. [From Chemist. See Alchemy.] 1. That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule. Note: Historically, chemistry is an outgrowth of alchemy (or alchemistry), with which it was anciently identified. 2. An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo. 3. A treatise on chemistry. Note: This word and its derivatives were formerly written with y, and sometimes with i, instead of e, in the first syllable, chymistry, chymist, chymical, etc., or chimistry, chimist, chimical, etc.; and the pronunciation was conformed to the orthography. Inorganic chemistry, that which treats of inorganic or mineral substances. Organic chemistry, that which treats of the substances which form the structure of organized beings and their products, whether animal or vegetable; -- called also chemistry of the carbon compounds. There is no fundamental difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. Physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the organs and tissues of the body, and of the various physiological processes incident to life. Practical chemistry, or Applied chemistry, that which treats of the modes of manufacturing the products of chemistry that are useful in the arts, of their applications to economical purposes, and of the conditions essential to their best use. Pure chemistry, the consideration of the facts and theories of chemistry in their purely scientific relations, without necessary reference to their practical applications or mere utility.
Chymistry
Chymic Chym"ic, Chymist Chym"ist, Chymistry Chym"is*try [Obs.] See Chemic, Chemist, Chemistry.
Electro-chemistry
Electro-chemistry E*lec`tro-chem"is*try, n. That branch of science which treats of the relation of electricity to chemical changes.
Geochemistry
Geochemistry Ge`o*chem"is*try, n. [Gr. ?, ?, the earth + chemistry.] The study of the chemical composition of, and of actual or possible chemical changes in, the crust of the earth. -- Ge`o*chem"ic*al, a. -- Ge`o*chem"ist, n.
Iatrochemistry
Iatrochemistry I*a`tro*chem"is*try, n. Chemistry applied to, or used in, medicine; -- used especially with reference to the doctrines in the school of physicians in Flanders, in the 17th century, who held that health depends upon the proper chemical relations of the fluids of the body, and who endeavored to explain the conditions of health or disease by chemical principles.
Inorganic Chemistry
Inorganic In`or*gan"ic, a. [Pref. in- not + organic: cf. F. inorganique.] Not organic; without the organs necessary for life; devoid of an organized structure; unorganized; lifeness; inanimate; as, all chemical compounds are inorganic substances. Note: The term inorganic is used to denote any one the large series of substances (as minerals, metals, etc.), which are not directly connected with vital processes, either in origin or nature, and which are broadly and relatively contrasted with organic subscances. See Organic. Inorganic Chemistry. See under Chemistry.
Inorganic chemistry
Chemistry Chem"is*try (k[e^]m"[i^]s*tr[y^]; 277), n. [From Chemist. See Alchemy.] 1. That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule. Note: Historically, chemistry is an outgrowth of alchemy (or alchemistry), with which it was anciently identified. 2. An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo. 3. A treatise on chemistry. Note: This word and its derivatives were formerly written with y, and sometimes with i, instead of e, in the first syllable, chymistry, chymist, chymical, etc., or chimistry, chimist, chimical, etc.; and the pronunciation was conformed to the orthography. Inorganic chemistry, that which treats of inorganic or mineral substances. Organic chemistry, that which treats of the substances which form the structure of organized beings and their products, whether animal or vegetable; -- called also chemistry of the carbon compounds. There is no fundamental difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. Physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the organs and tissues of the body, and of the various physiological processes incident to life. Practical chemistry, or Applied chemistry, that which treats of the modes of manufacturing the products of chemistry that are useful in the arts, of their applications to economical purposes, and of the conditions essential to their best use. Pure chemistry, the consideration of the facts and theories of chemistry in their purely scientific relations, without necessary reference to their practical applications or mere utility.
Macro-chemistry
Macro-chemistry Mac`ro-chem"is*try, n. [Macro- + chemistry.] (Chem.) The science which treats of the chemical properties, actions or relations of substances in quantity; -- distinguished from micro-chemistry.
Micro-chemistry
Micro-chemistry Mi`cro-chem"is*try, n. [Micro- + chemistry.] The application of chemical tests to minute objects or portions of matter, magnified by the use of the microscopy; -- distinguished from macro-chemistry.
Organic chemistry
Organic Or*gan"ic, a. [L. organicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. organique.] 1. (Biol.) Of or pertaining to an organ or its functions, or to objects composed of organs; consisting of organs, or containing them; as, the organic structure of animals and plants; exhibiting characters peculiar to living organisms; as, organic bodies, organic life, organic remains. Cf. Inorganic. 2. Produced by the organs; as, organic pleasure. [R.] 3. Instrumental; acting as instruments of nature or of art to a certain destined function or end. [R.] Those organic arts which enable men to discourse and write perspicuously. --Milton. 4. Forming a whole composed of organs. Hence: Of or pertaining to a system of organs; inherent in, or resulting from, a certain organization; as, an organic government; his love of truth was not inculcated, but organic. 5. Pertaining to, or denoting, any one of the large series of substances which, in nature or origin, are connected with vital processes, and include many substances of artificial production which may or may not occur in animals or plants; -- contrasted with inorganic. Note: The principles of organic and inorganic chemistry are identical; but the enormous number and the completeness of related series of organic compounds, together with their remarkable facility of exchange and substitution, offer an illustration of chemical reaction and homology not to be paralleled in inorganic chemistry. Organic analysis (Chem.), the analysis of organic compounds, concerned chiefly with the determination of carbon as carbon dioxide, hydrogen as water, oxygen as the difference between the sum of the others and 100 per cent, and nitrogen as free nitrogen, ammonia, or nitric oxide; -- formerly called ultimate analysis, in distinction from proximate analysis. Organic chemistry. See under Chemistry. Organic compounds. (Chem.) See Carbon compounds, under Carbon. Organic description of a curve (Geom.), the description of a curve on a plane by means of instruments. --Brande & C. Organic disease (Med.), a disease attended with morbid changes in the structure of the organs of the body or in the composition of its fluids; -- opposed to functional disease. Organic electricity. See under Electricity. Organic law or laws, a law or system of laws, or declaration of principles fundamental to the existence and organization of a political or other association; a constitution. Organic stricture (Med.), a contraction of one of the natural passages of the body produced by structural changes in its walls, as distinguished from a spasmodic stricture, which is due to muscular contraction.
Organic chemistry
Chemistry Chem"is*try (k[e^]m"[i^]s*tr[y^]; 277), n. [From Chemist. See Alchemy.] 1. That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule. Note: Historically, chemistry is an outgrowth of alchemy (or alchemistry), with which it was anciently identified. 2. An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo. 3. A treatise on chemistry. Note: This word and its derivatives were formerly written with y, and sometimes with i, instead of e, in the first syllable, chymistry, chymist, chymical, etc., or chimistry, chimist, chimical, etc.; and the pronunciation was conformed to the orthography. Inorganic chemistry, that which treats of inorganic or mineral substances. Organic chemistry, that which treats of the substances which form the structure of organized beings and their products, whether animal or vegetable; -- called also chemistry of the carbon compounds. There is no fundamental difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. Physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the organs and tissues of the body, and of the various physiological processes incident to life. Practical chemistry, or Applied chemistry, that which treats of the modes of manufacturing the products of chemistry that are useful in the arts, of their applications to economical purposes, and of the conditions essential to their best use. Pure chemistry, the consideration of the facts and theories of chemistry in their purely scientific relations, without necessary reference to their practical applications or mere utility.
Palmistry
Palmistry Pal`mis*try, n.[See Palmister.] 1. The art or practice of divining or telling fortunes, or of judging of character, by the lines and marks in the palm of the hand; chiromancy. --Ascham. Cowper. 2. A dexterous use or trick of the hand. --Addison.
Pharmaceutical chemistry
Pharmaceutic Phar`ma*ceu"tic (f[aum]r`m[.a]*s[=u]"t[i^]k), Pharmaceutical Phar`ma*ceu"tic*al (-t[i^]*kal), a. [L. pharmaceuticus, Gr. farmakeytiko`s, fr. farmakey`ein: cf. F. pharmaceutique. See Pharmacy.] Of or pertaining to the knowledge or art of pharmacy, or to the art of preparing medicines according to the rules or formulas of pharmacy; as, pharmaceutical preparations. -- Phar`ma*ceu"tic*al*ly, adv. Pharmaceutical chemistry, that department of chemistry which ascertains or regulates the composition of medicinal substances.
Photochemistry
Photochemistry Pho`to*chem"is*try, n. [Photo- + chemistry.] (Chem.) The branch of chemistry which relates to the effect of light in producing chemical changes, as in photography.
Physiological chemistry
Chemistry Chem"is*try (k[e^]m"[i^]s*tr[y^]; 277), n. [From Chemist. See Alchemy.] 1. That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule. Note: Historically, chemistry is an outgrowth of alchemy (or alchemistry), with which it was anciently identified. 2. An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo. 3. A treatise on chemistry. Note: This word and its derivatives were formerly written with y, and sometimes with i, instead of e, in the first syllable, chymistry, chymist, chymical, etc., or chimistry, chimist, chimical, etc.; and the pronunciation was conformed to the orthography. Inorganic chemistry, that which treats of inorganic or mineral substances. Organic chemistry, that which treats of the substances which form the structure of organized beings and their products, whether animal or vegetable; -- called also chemistry of the carbon compounds. There is no fundamental difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. Physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the organs and tissues of the body, and of the various physiological processes incident to life. Practical chemistry, or Applied chemistry, that which treats of the modes of manufacturing the products of chemistry that are useful in the arts, of their applications to economical purposes, and of the conditions essential to their best use. Pure chemistry, the consideration of the facts and theories of chemistry in their purely scientific relations, without necessary reference to their practical applications or mere utility.
Phytochemistry
Phytochemistry Phy"to*chem"is*try, n. [Phyto- + chemistry.] Chemistry in its relation to vegetable bodies; vegetable chemistry. --R. Hunt.
Practical chemistry
Chemistry Chem"is*try (k[e^]m"[i^]s*tr[y^]; 277), n. [From Chemist. See Alchemy.] 1. That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule. Note: Historically, chemistry is an outgrowth of alchemy (or alchemistry), with which it was anciently identified. 2. An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo. 3. A treatise on chemistry. Note: This word and its derivatives were formerly written with y, and sometimes with i, instead of e, in the first syllable, chymistry, chymist, chymical, etc., or chimistry, chimist, chimical, etc.; and the pronunciation was conformed to the orthography. Inorganic chemistry, that which treats of inorganic or mineral substances. Organic chemistry, that which treats of the substances which form the structure of organized beings and their products, whether animal or vegetable; -- called also chemistry of the carbon compounds. There is no fundamental difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. Physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the organs and tissues of the body, and of the various physiological processes incident to life. Practical chemistry, or Applied chemistry, that which treats of the modes of manufacturing the products of chemistry that are useful in the arts, of their applications to economical purposes, and of the conditions essential to their best use. Pure chemistry, the consideration of the facts and theories of chemistry in their purely scientific relations, without necessary reference to their practical applications or mere utility.
Psalmistry
Psalmistry Psalm"ist*ry, n. The use of psalms in devotion; psalmody.
Pure chemistry
Pure Pure, a. [Compar. Purer; superl. Purest.] [OE. pur, F. pur, fr. L. purus; akin to putus pure, clear, putare to clean, trim, prune, set in order, settle, reckon, consider, think, Skr. p? to clean, and perh. E. fire. Cf. Putative.] 1. Separate from all heterogeneous or extraneous matter; free from mixture or combination; clean; mere; simple; unmixed; as, pure water; pure clay; pure air; pure compassion. The pure fetters on his shins great. --Chaucer. A guinea is pure gold if it has in it no alloy. --I. Watts. 2. Free from moral defilement or quilt; hence, innocent; guileless; chaste; -- applied to persons. ``Keep thyself pure.' --1 Tim. v. 22. Now the end of the commandment is charity out of a pure heart, and of a good conscience. --1 Tim. i. 5. 3. Free from that which harms, vitiates, weakens, or pollutes; genuine; real; perfect; -- applied to things and actions. ``Pure religion and impartial laws.' --Tickell. ``The pure, fine talk of Rome.' --Ascham. Such was the origin of a friendship as warm and pure as any that ancient or modern history records. --Macaulay. 4. (Script.) Ritually clean; fitted for holy services. Thou shalt set them in two rows, six on a row, upon the pure table before the Lord. --Lev. xxiv. 6. 5. (Phonetics) Of a single, simple sound or tone; -- said of some vowels and the unaspirated consonants. Pure-impure, completely or totally impure. ``The inhabitants were pure-impure pagans.' --Fuller. Pure blue. (Chem.) See Methylene blue, under Methylene. Pure chemistry. See under Chemistry. Pure mathematics, that portion of mathematics which treats of the principles of the science, or contradistinction to applied mathematics, which treats of the application of the principles to the investigation of other branches of knowledge, or to the practical wants of life. See Mathematics. --Davies & Peck (Math. Dict. ) Pure villenage (Feudal Law), a tenure of lands by uncertain services at the will of the lord. --Blackstone. Syn: Unmixed; clear; simple; real; true; genuine; unadulterated; uncorrupted; unsullied; untarnished; unstained; stainless; clean; fair; unspotted; spotless; incorrupt; chaste; unpolluted; undefiled; immaculate; innocent; guiltless; guileless; holy.
Pure chemistry
Chemistry Chem"is*try (k[e^]m"[i^]s*tr[y^]; 277), n. [From Chemist. See Alchemy.] 1. That branch of science which treats of the composition of substances, and of the changes which they undergo in consequence of alterations in the constitution of the molecules, which depend upon variations of the number, kind, or mode of arrangement, of the constituent atoms. These atoms are not assumed to be indivisible, but merely the finest grade of subdivision hitherto attained. Chemistry deals with the changes in the composition and constitution of molecules. See Atom, Molecule. Note: Historically, chemistry is an outgrowth of alchemy (or alchemistry), with which it was anciently identified. 2. An application of chemical theory and method to the consideration of some particular subject; as, the chemistry of iron; the chemistry of indigo. 3. A treatise on chemistry. Note: This word and its derivatives were formerly written with y, and sometimes with i, instead of e, in the first syllable, chymistry, chymist, chymical, etc., or chimistry, chimist, chimical, etc.; and the pronunciation was conformed to the orthography. Inorganic chemistry, that which treats of inorganic or mineral substances. Organic chemistry, that which treats of the substances which form the structure of organized beings and their products, whether animal or vegetable; -- called also chemistry of the carbon compounds. There is no fundamental difference between organic and inorganic chemistry. Physiological chemistry, the chemistry of the organs and tissues of the body, and of the various physiological processes incident to life. Practical chemistry, or Applied chemistry, that which treats of the modes of manufacturing the products of chemistry that are useful in the arts, of their applications to economical purposes, and of the conditions essential to their best use. Pure chemistry, the consideration of the facts and theories of chemistry in their purely scientific relations, without necessary reference to their practical applications or mere utility.
Stereo-chemistry
Stereo-chemistry Ste`re*o-chem"is*try, n. [Stereo- + chemistry.] (Chem.) Chemistry considered with reference to the space relations of atoms.
Thermochemistry
Thermochemistry Ther`mo*chem"is*try, n. [Thermo- + chemistry.] That branch of chemical science which includes the investigation of the various relations existing between chemical action and that manifestation of force termed heat, or the determination of the heat evolved by, or employed in, chemical actions.
Zoochemistry
Zoochemistry o`["o]*chem"is*try, n. [Zo["o]- + chemistry.] Animal chemistry; particularly, the description of the chemical compounds entering into the composition of the animal body, in distinction from biochemistry.

Meaning of Mistry from wikipedia

- Cyrus Pallonji Mistry (born 4 July 1968) is a businessman of Indian origin and Irish citizenship, he served as the former chairman of Tata Group, an Indian...
- Mistry or Mistry may refer to: Mistri – a word used for master-craftsman or foreman in India, such as the vishwakarma caste. Mistri (caste) – a caste of...
- Pallonji Shapoorji Mistry (born 1929) is an Indian-born Irish billionaire construction tycoon and chairman of Shapoorji Pallonji Group who is the richest...
- Pranav Mistry (born 14 May 1981) is a computer scientist and inventor. He is the President and CEO of Samsung STAR Labs since October 2019. He is best...
- Rohinton Mistry CM (born 3 July 1952) is an Indian-born Canadian writer. He was awarded the Neustadt International Prize for Literature in 2012. Rohinton...
- Jimi Mistry (born 1 January 1973) is an English actor, known for appearing in numerous films such as East Is East, Blood Diamond, The Guru, 2012, West...
- Amit Mistry is an Indian actor who has worked in theater, TV shows and movies. He pla**** a role in Shor in the City. https://timesofindia.indiatimes...
- Jennifer Mistry Bansiwal is an Indian actress. Born and brought up in Jabalpur, Madhya Pradesh, she is a graduate from Guru Gobind Singh Khalsa College...
- founder Pallonji Mistry, also named Pallonji Mistry, until 2012, when he announced his retirement and the succession of his son, Shapoor Mistry. Shapoorji Pallonji...
- Shapoorji Mistry was an Indian businessman, and the founder of the Shapoorji Pallonji Group. He was the father of Pallonji Mistry. Shapoorji Mistry's grandson...
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