Definition of Electricity. Meaning of Electricity. Synonyms of Electricity

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Electricity. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Electricity and, of course, Electricity synonyms and on the right images related to the word Electricity.

Definition of Electricity

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Animal electricity
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Dynamical electricity
Dynamic Dy*nam"ic, Dynamical Dy*nam"ic*al, a. [Gr. ? powerful, fr. ? power, fr. ? to be able; cf. L. durus hard, E. dure: cf. F. dynamique.] 1. Of or pertaining to dynamics; belonging to energy or power; characterized by energy or production of force. Science, as well as history, has its past to show, -- a past indeed, much larger; but its immensity is dynamic, not divine. --J. Martineau. The vowel is produced by phonetic, not by dynamic, causes. --J. Peile. 2. Relating to physical forces, effects, or laws; as, dynamical geology. As natural science has become more dynamic, so has history. --Prof. Shedd. Dynamical electricity. See under Electricity.
Franklinic electricity
Franklinic Frank*lin"ic, a. Of or pertaining to Benjamin Franklin. Franklinic electricity, electricity produced by friction; called also statical electricity.
Magneto-electricity
Magneto-electricity Mag`net*o-e`lec*tric"i*ty, n. 1. Electricity evolved by the action of magnets. 2. (Physics) That branch of science which treats of the development of electricity by the action of magnets; -- the counterpart of electro-magnetism.
Organic electricity
Organic Or*gan"ic, a. [L. organicus, Gr. ?: cf. F. organique.] 1. (Biol.) Of or pertaining to an organ or its functions, or to objects composed of organs; consisting of organs, or containing them; as, the organic structure of animals and plants; exhibiting characters peculiar to living organisms; as, organic bodies, organic life, organic remains. Cf. Inorganic. 2. Produced by the organs; as, organic pleasure. [R.] 3. Instrumental; acting as instruments of nature or of art to a certain destined function or end. [R.] Those organic arts which enable men to discourse and write perspicuously. --Milton. 4. Forming a whole composed of organs. Hence: Of or pertaining to a system of organs; inherent in, or resulting from, a certain organization; as, an organic government; his love of truth was not inculcated, but organic. 5. Pertaining to, or denoting, any one of the large series of substances which, in nature or origin, are connected with vital processes, and include many substances of artificial production which may or may not occur in animals or plants; -- contrasted with inorganic. Note: The principles of organic and inorganic chemistry are identical; but the enormous number and the completeness of related series of organic compounds, together with their remarkable facility of exchange and substitution, offer an illustration of chemical reaction and homology not to be paralleled in inorganic chemistry. Organic analysis (Chem.), the analysis of organic compounds, concerned chiefly with the determination of carbon as carbon dioxide, hydrogen as water, oxygen as the difference between the sum of the others and 100 per cent, and nitrogen as free nitrogen, ammonia, or nitric oxide; -- formerly called ultimate analysis, in distinction from proximate analysis. Organic chemistry. See under Chemistry. Organic compounds. (Chem.) See Carbon compounds, under Carbon. Organic description of a curve (Geom.), the description of a curve on a plane by means of instruments. --Brande & C. Organic disease (Med.), a disease attended with morbid changes in the structure of the organs of the body or in the composition of its fluids; -- opposed to functional disease. Organic electricity. See under Electricity. Organic law or laws, a law or system of laws, or declaration of principles fundamental to the existence and organization of a political or other association; a constitution. Organic stricture (Med.), a contraction of one of the natural passages of the body produced by structural changes in its walls, as distinguished from a spasmodic stricture, which is due to muscular contraction.
Pyroelectricity
Pyroelectricity Pyr`o*e`lec*tric"i*ty, n. (Physics) Electricity developed by means of heat; the science which treats of electricity thus developed.
Statical electricity
Static Stat"ic, Statical Stat"ic*al, a. [Gr. ? causing to stand, skilled in weighing, fr. ? to cause to stand: cf. F. statique. See Stand, and cf. Stage.] 1. Resting; acting by mere weight without motion; as, statical pressure; static objects. 2. Pertaining to bodies at rest or in equilibrium. Statical electricity. See Note under Electricity, 1. Statical moment. See under Moment.
statical electricity
Franklinic Frank*lin"ic, a. Of or pertaining to Benjamin Franklin. Franklinic electricity, electricity produced by friction; called also statical electricity.
Voltaic electricity
Voltaic Vol*ta"ic, a. [Cf. F. volta["i]que, It. voltaico.] 1. Of or pertaining to Alessandro Volta, who first devised apparatus for developing electric currents by chemical action, and established this branch of electric science; discovered by Volta; as, voltaic electricity. 2. Of or pertaining to voltaism, or voltaic electricity; as, voltaic induction; the voltaic arc. Note: See the Note under Galvanism. Voltaic arc, a luminous arc, of intense brilliancy, formed between carbon points as electrodes by the passage of a powerful voltaic current. Voltaic battery, an apparatus variously constructed, consisting of a series of plates or pieces of dissimilar metals, as copper and zinc, arranged in pairs, and subjected to the action of a saline or acid solution, by which a current of electricity is generated whenever the two poles, or ends of the series, are connected by a conductor; a galvanic battery. See Battery, 4. (b), and Note. Voltaic circuit. See under Circuit. Voltaic couple or element, a single pair of the connected plates of a battery. Voltaic electricity. See the Note under Electricity. Voltaic pile, a kind of voltaic battery consisting of alternate disks of dissimilar metals, separated by moistened cloth or paper. See 5th Pile. Voltaic protection of metals, the protection of a metal exposed to the corrosive action of sea water, saline or acid liquids, or the like, by associating it with a metal which is positive to it, as when iron is galvanized, or coated with zinc.

Meaning of Electricity from wikipedia

- Electricity is the set of physical phenomena ****ociated with the presence and motion of matter that has a property of electric charge. In early days,...
- Electricity generation is the process of generating electric power from sources of primary energy. For electric utilities in the electric power industry...
- Electricity pricing (sometimes referred to as electricity tariff or the price of electricity) varies widely from country to country and significantly from...
- Static electricity is an imbalance of electric charges within or on the surface of a material. The charge remains until it is able to move away by means...
- considered sustainable. Sustainable energy sources can be used to generate electricity, to heat and cool buildings, and to power transportation systems and...
- is electricity produced from hydropower. In 2015, hydropower generated 16.6% of the world's total electricity and 70% of all renewable electricity, and...
- The utility electricity sector in India has one national grid with an installed capacity of 357.875 GW as of 30 June 2019. Renewable power plants, which...
- Mains electricity (as it is known in the UK and some parts of Canada; US terms include grid power, wall power, and domestic power; in much of Canada it...
- An electricity meter, electric meter, electrical meter, or energy meter is a device that measures the amount of electric energy consumed by a residence...
- heat. Renewable energy often provides energy in four important areas: electricity generation, air and water heating/cooling, transportation, and rural...
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