Definition of Laurel. Meaning of Laurel. Synonyms of Laurel

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Laurel. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Laurel and, of course, Laurel synonyms and on the right images related to the word Laurel.

Definition of Laurel

No result for Laurel. Showing similar results...

ground laurel
Arbutus Ar"bu*tus, Arbute Ar"bute, n. [L. arbutus, akin to arbor tree.] The strawberry tree, a genus of evergreen shrubs, of the Heath family. It has a berry externally resembling the strawberry; the arbute tree. Trailing arbutus (Bot.), a creeping or trailing plant of the Heath family (Epig[ae]a repens), having white or usually rose-colored flowers with a delicate fragrance, growing in small axillary clusters, and appearing early in the spring; in New England known as mayflower; -- called also ground laurel. --Gray.
Laureled
Laureled Lau"reled, a. Crowned with laurel, or with a laurel wreath; laureate. [Written also laurelled.]
Laurelia Novae Zelandiae
Sassafras Sas"sa*fras, n. [F. sassafras (cf. It. sassafrasso, sassafras, Sp. sasafras, salsafras, salsifrax, salsifragia, saxifragia), fr. L. saxifraga saxifrage. See Saxifrage.] (Bot.) An American tree of the Laurel family (Sassafras officinale); also, the bark of the roots, which has an aromatic smell and taste. Australian sassafras, a lofty tree (Doryophora Sassafras) with aromatic bark and leaves. Chilian sassafras, an aromatic tree (Laurelia sempervirens). New Zealand sassafras, a similar tree (Laurelia Nov[ae] Zelandi[ae]). Sassafras nut. See Pichurim bean. Swamp sassafras, the sweet bay (Magnolia glauca). See Magnolia.
Laurelia sempervirens
Sassafras Sas"sa*fras, n. [F. sassafras (cf. It. sassafrasso, sassafras, Sp. sasafras, salsafras, salsifrax, salsifragia, saxifragia), fr. L. saxifraga saxifrage. See Saxifrage.] (Bot.) An American tree of the Laurel family (Sassafras officinale); also, the bark of the roots, which has an aromatic smell and taste. Australian sassafras, a lofty tree (Doryophora Sassafras) with aromatic bark and leaves. Chilian sassafras, an aromatic tree (Laurelia sempervirens). New Zealand sassafras, a similar tree (Laurelia Nov[ae] Zelandi[ae]). Sassafras nut. See Pichurim bean. Swamp sassafras, the sweet bay (Magnolia glauca). See Magnolia.
Laurelia sempervirens
Nutmeg Nut"meg, n. [OE. notemuge; note nut + OF. muge musk, of the same origin as E. musk; cf. OF. noix muguette nutmeg, F. noix muscade. See Nut, and Musk.] (Bot.) The kernel of the fruit of the nutmeg tree (Myristica fragrans), a native of the Molucca Islands, but cultivated elsewhere in the tropics. Note: This fruit is a nearly spherical drupe, of the size of a pear, of a yellowish color without and almost white within. This opens into two nearly equal longitudinal valves, inclosing the nut surrounded by its aril, which is mace The nutmeg is an aromatic, very grateful to the taste and smell, and much used in cookery. Other species of Myristica yield nutmegs of inferior quality. American, Calabash, or Jamaica, nutmeg, the fruit of a tropical shrub (Monodora Myristica). It is about the size of an orange, and contains many aromatic seeds imbedded in pulp. Brazilian nutmeg, the fruit of a lauraceous tree, Cryptocarya moschata. California nutmeg, tree of the Yew family (Torreya Californica), growing in the Western United States, and having a seed which resembles a nutmeg in appearance, but is strongly impregnated with turpentine. Clove nutmeg, the Ravensara aromatica, a laura ceous tree of Madagascar. The foliage is used as a spice, but the seed is acrid and caustic. Jamaica nutmeg. See American nutmeg (above). Nutmeg bird (Zo["o]l.), an Indian finch (Munia punctularia). Nutmeg butter, a solid oil extracted from the nutmeg by expression. Nutmeg flower (Bot.), a ranunculaceous herb (Nigella sativa) with small black aromatic seeds, which are used medicinally and for excluding moths from furs and clothing. Nutmeg liver (Med.), a name applied to the liver, when, as the result of heart or lung disease, it undergoes congestion and pigmentation about the central veins of its lobules, giving it an appearance resembling that of a nutmeg. Nutmeg melon (Bot.), a small variety of muskmelon of a rich flavor. Nutmeg pigeon (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of pigeons of the genus Myristicivora, native of the East Indies and Australia. The color is usually white, or cream-white, with black on the wings and tail. Nutmeg wood (Bot.), the wood of the Palmyra palm. Peruvian nutmeg, the aromatic seed of a South American tree (Laurelia sempervirens). Plume nutmeg (Bot.), a spicy tree of Australia (Atherosperma moschata).
laurelled
Laureled Lau"reled, a. Crowned with laurel, or with a laurel wreath; laureate. [Written also laurelled.]
mountain laurel
Kalmia Kal"mi*a, n. [NL. Named in honor of Peter Kalm, a Swedish botanist.] (Bot.) A genus of North American shrubs with poisonous evergreen foliage and corymbs of showy flowers. Called also mountain laurel, ivy bush, lamb kill, calico bush, etc.
sheep laurel
Lambkill Lamb"kill`, n. (Bot.) A small American ericaceous shrub (Kalmia angustifolia); -- called also calfkill, sheepkill, sheep laurel, etc. It is supposed to poison sheep and other animals that eat it at times when the snow is deep and they cannot find other food.
Swamp laurel
Swamp Swamp, n. [Cf. AS. swam a fungus, OD. swam a sponge, D. zwam a fungus, G. schwamm a sponge, Icel. sv["o]ppr, Dan. & Sw. swamp, Goth. swamms, Gr. somfo`s porous, spongy.] Wet, spongy land; soft, low ground saturated with water, but not usually covered with it; marshy ground away from the seashore. Gray swamps and pools, waste places of the hern. --Tennyson. A swamp differs from a bog and a marsh in producing trees and shrubs, while the latter produce only herbage, plants, and mosses. --Farming Encyc. (E. Edwards, Words). Swamp blackbird. (Zo["o]l.) See Redwing (b) . Swamp cabbage (Bot.), skunk cabbage. Swamp deer (Zo["o]l.), an Asiatic deer (Rucervus Duvaucelli) of India. Swamp hen. (Zo["o]l.) (a) An Australian azure-breasted bird (Porphyrio bellus); -- called also goollema. (b) An Australian water crake, or rail (Porzana Tabuensis); -- called also little swamp hen. (c) The European purple gallinule. Swamp honeysuckle (Bot.), an American shrub (Azalea, or Rhododendron, viscosa) growing in swampy places, with fragrant flowers of a white color, or white tinged with rose; -- called also swamp pink. Swamp hook, a hook and chain used by lumbermen in handling logs. Cf. Cant hook. Swamp itch. (Med.) See Prairie itch, under Prairie. Swamp laurel (Bot.), a shrub (Kalmia glauca) having small leaves with the lower surface glaucous. Swamp maple (Bot.), red maple. See Maple. Swamp oak (Bot.), a name given to several kinds of oak which grow in swampy places, as swamp Spanish oak (Quercus palustris), swamp white oak (Q. bicolor), swamp post oak (Q. lyrata). Swamp ore (Min.), bog ore; limonite. Swamp partridge (Zo["o]l.), any one of several Australian game birds of the genera Synoicus and Excalfatoria, allied to the European partridges. Swamp robin (Zo["o]l.), the chewink. Swamp sassafras (Bot.), a small North American tree of the genus Magnolia (M. glauca) with aromatic leaves and fragrant creamy-white blossoms; -- called also sweet bay. Swamp sparrow (Zo["o]l.), a common North American sparrow (Melospiza Georgiana, or M. palustris), closely resembling the song sparrow. It lives in low, swampy places. Swamp willow. (Bot.) See Pussy willow, under Pussy.
Wood laurel
Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; -- frequently used in the plural. Light thickens, and the crow Makes wing to the rooky wood. --Shak. 2. The substance of trees and the like; the hard fibrous substance which composes the body of a tree and its branches, and which is covered by the bark; timber. ``To worship their own work in wood and stone for gods.' --Milton. 3. (Bot.) The fibrous material which makes up the greater part of the stems and branches of trees and shrubby plants, and is found to a less extent in herbaceous stems. It consists of elongated tubular or needle-shaped cells of various kinds, usually interwoven with the shinning bands called silver grain. Note: Wood consists chiefly of the carbohydrates cellulose and lignin, which are isomeric with starch. 4. Trees cut or sawed for the fire or other uses. Wood acid, Wood vinegar (Chem.), a complex acid liquid obtained in the dry distillation of wood, and containing large quantities of acetic acid; hence, specifically, acetic acid. Formerly called pyroligneous acid. Wood anemone (Bot.), a delicate flower (Anemone nemorosa) of early spring; -- also called windflower. See Illust. of Anemone. Wood ant (Zo["o]l.), a large ant (Formica rufa) which lives in woods and forests, and constructs large nests. Wood apple (Bot.). See Elephant apple, under Elephant. Wood baboon (Zo["o]l.), the drill. Wood betony. (Bot.) (a) Same as Betony. (b) The common American lousewort (Pedicularis Canadensis), a low perennial herb with yellowish or purplish flowers. Wood borer. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The larva of any one of numerous species of boring beetles, esp. elaters, longicorn beetles, buprestidans, and certain weevils. See Apple borer, under Apple, and Pine weevil, under Pine. (b) The larva of any one of various species of lepidopterous insects, especially of the clearwing moths, as the peach-tree borer (see under Peach), and of the goat moths. (c) The larva of various species of hymenopterous of the tribe Urocerata. See Tremex. (d) Any one of several bivalve shells which bore in wood, as the teredos, and species of Xylophaga. (e) Any one of several species of small Crustacea, as the Limnoria, and the boring amphipod (Chelura terebrans). Wood carpet, a kind of floor covering made of thin pieces of wood secured to a flexible backing, as of cloth. --Knight. Wood cell (Bot.), a slender cylindrical or prismatic cell usually tapering to a point at both ends. It is the principal constituent of woody fiber. Wood choir, the choir, or chorus, of birds in the woods. [Poetic] --Coleridge. Wood coal, charcoal; also, lignite, or brown coal. Wood cricket (Zo["o]l.), a small European cricket (Nemobius sylvestris). Wood culver (Zo["o]l.), the wood pigeon. Wood cut, an engraving on wood; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood dove (Zo["o]l.), the stockdove. Wood drink, a decoction or infusion of medicinal woods. Wood duck (Zo["o]l.) (a) A very beautiful American duck (Aix sponsa). The male has a large crest, and its plumage is varied with green, purple, black, white, and red. It builds its nest in trees, whence the name. Called also bridal duck, summer duck, and wood widgeon. (b) The hooded merganser. (c) The Australian maned goose (Chlamydochen jubata). Wood echo, an echo from the wood. Wood engraver. (a) An engraver on wood. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any of several species of small beetles whose larv[ae] bore beneath the bark of trees, and excavate furrows in the wood often more or less resembling coarse engravings; especially, Xyleborus xylographus. Wood engraving. (a) The act or art engraving on wood; xylography. (b) An engraving on wood; a wood cut; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood fern. (Bot.) See Shield fern, under Shield. Wood fiber. (a) (Bot.) Fibrovascular tissue. (b) Wood comminuted, and reduced to a powdery or dusty mass. Wood fretter (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of beetles whose larv[ae] bore in the wood, or beneath the bark, of trees. Wood frog (Zo["o]l.), a common North American frog (Rana sylvatica) which lives chiefly in the woods, except during the breeding season. It is drab or yellowish brown, with a black stripe on each side of the head. Wood germander. (Bot.) See under Germander. Wood god, a fabled sylvan deity. Wood grass. (Bot.) See under Grass. Wood grouse. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The capercailzie. (b) The spruce partridge. See under Spruce. Wood guest (Zo["o]l.), the ringdove. [Prov. Eng.] Wood hen. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of Old World short-winged rails of the genus Ocydromus, including the weka and allied species. (b) The American woodcock. Wood hoopoe (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World arboreal birds belonging to Irrisor and allied genera. They are closely allied to the common hoopoe, but have a curved beak, and a longer tail. Wood ibis (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of large, long-legged, wading birds belonging to the genus Tantalus. The head and neck are naked or scantily covered with feathers. The American wood ibis (Tantalus loculator) is common in Florida. Wood lark (Zo["o]l.), a small European lark (Alauda arborea), which, like, the skylark, utters its notes while on the wing. So called from its habit of perching on trees. Wood laurel (Bot.), a European evergreen shrub (Daphne Laureola). Wood leopard (Zo["o]l.), a European spotted moth (Zeuzera [ae]sculi) allied to the goat moth. Its large fleshy larva bores in the wood of the apple, pear, and other fruit trees. Wood lily (Bot.), the lily of the valley. Wood lock (Naut.), a piece of wood close fitted and sheathed with copper, in the throating or score of the pintle, to keep the rudder from rising. Wood louse (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial isopod Crustacea belonging to Oniscus, Armadillo, and related genera. See Sow bug, under Sow, and Pill bug, under Pill. (b) Any one of several species of small, wingless, pseudoneuropterous insects of the family Psocid[ae], which live in the crevices of walls and among old books and papers. Some of the species are called also book lice, and deathticks, or deathwatches. Wood mite (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous small mites of the family Oribatid[ae]. They are found chiefly in woods, on tree trunks and stones. Wood mote. (Eng. Law) (a) Formerly, the forest court. (b) The court of attachment. Wood nettle. (Bot.) See under Nettle. Wood nightshade (Bot.), woody nightshade. Wood nut (Bot.), the filbert. Wood nymph. (a) A nymph inhabiting the woods; a fabled goddess of the woods; a dryad. ``The wood nymphs, decked with daisies trim.' --Milton. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored moths belonging to the genus Eudryas. The larv[ae] are bright-colored, and some of the species, as Eudryas grata, and E. unio, feed on the leaves of the grapevine. (c) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored South American humming birds belonging to the genus Thalurania. The males are bright blue, or green and blue. Wood offering, wood burnt on the altar. We cast the lots . . . for the wood offering. --Neh. x. 34. Wood oil (Bot.), a resinous oil obtained from several East Indian trees of the genus Dipterocarpus, having properties similar to those of copaiba, and sometimes substituted for it. It is also used for mixing paint. See Gurjun. Wood opal (Min.), a striped variety of coarse opal, having some resemblance to wood. Wood paper, paper made of wood pulp. See Wood pulp, below. Wood pewee (Zo["o]l.), a North American tyrant flycatcher (Contopus virens). It closely resembles the pewee, but is smaller. Wood pie (Zo["o]l.), any black and white woodpecker, especially the European great spotted woodpecker. Wood pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of Old World pigeons belonging to Palumbus and allied genera of the family Columbid[ae]. (b) The ringdove. Wood puceron (Zo["o]l.), a plant louse. Wood pulp (Technol.), vegetable fiber obtained from the poplar and other white woods, and so softened by digestion with a hot solution of alkali that it can be formed into sheet paper, etc. It is now produced on an immense scale. Wood quail (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of East Indian crested quails belonging to Rollulus and allied genera, as the red-crested wood quail (R. roulroul), the male of which is bright green, with a long crest of red hairlike feathers. Wood rabbit (Zo["o]l.), the cottontail. Wood rat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of American wild rats of the genus Neotoma found in the Southern United States; -- called also bush rat. The Florida wood rat (Neotoma Floridana) is the best-known species. Wood reed grass (Bot.), a tall grass (Cinna arundinacea) growing in moist woods. Wood reeve, the steward or overseer of a wood. [Eng.] Wood rush (Bot.), any plant of the genus Luzula, differing from the true rushes of the genus Juncus chiefly in having very few seeds in each capsule. Wood sage (Bot.), a name given to several labiate plants of the genus Teucrium. See Germander. Wood screw, a metal screw formed with a sharp thread, and usually with a slotted head, for insertion in wood. Wood sheldrake (Zo["o]l.), the hooded merganser. Wood shock (Zo["o]l.), the fisher. See Fisher, 2. Wood shrike (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World singing birds belonging to Grallina, Collyricincla, Prionops, and allied genera, common in India and Australia. They are allied to the true shrikes, but feed upon both insects and berries. Wood snipe. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The American woodcock. (b) An Asiatic snipe (Gallinago nemoricola). Wood soot, soot from burnt wood. Wood sore. (Zo["o]l.) See Cuckoo spit, under Cuckoo. Wood sorrel (Bot.), a plant of the genus Oxalis (Oxalis Acetosella), having an acid taste. See Illust. (a) of Shamrock. Wood spirit. (Chem.) See Methyl alcohol, under Methyl. Wood stamp, a carved or engraved block or stamp of wood, for impressing figures or colors on fabrics. Wood star (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small South American humming birds belonging to the genus Calothorax. The male has a brilliant gorget of blue, purple, and other colors. Wood sucker (Zo["o]l.), the yaffle. Wood swallow (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World passerine birds belonging to the genus Artamus and allied genera of the family Artamid[ae]. They are common in the East Indies, Asia, and Australia. In form and habits they resemble swallows, but in structure they resemble shrikes. They are usually black above and white beneath. Wood tapper (Zo["o]l.), any woodpecker. Wood tar. See under Tar. Wood thrush, (Zo["o]l.) (a) An American thrush (Turdus mustelinus) noted for the sweetness of its song. See under Thrush. (b) The missel thrush. Wood tick. See in Vocabulary. Wood tin. (Min.). See Cassiterite. Wood titmouse (Zo["o]l.), the goldcgest. Wood tortoise (Zo["o]l.), the sculptured tortoise. See under Sculptured. Wood vine (Bot.), the white bryony. Wood vinegar. See Wood acid, above. Wood warbler. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of American warblers of the genus Dendroica. See Warbler. (b) A European warbler (Phylloscopus sibilatrix); -- called also green wren, wood wren, and yellow wren. Wood worm (Zo["o]l.), a larva that bores in wood; a wood borer. Wood wren. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The wood warbler. (b) The willow warbler.

Meaning of Laurel from wikipedia

- Laurel may refer to: Lauraceae, also known as the laurel family, a family of flowering plants Laurel particularly refers to plants used for laurel wreaths:...
- Stan Laurel (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson, 16 June 1890 – 23 February 1965) was an English comic actor, writer, and film director who was part of the...
- Laurel and Hardy were a comedy double act during the early Cl****ical Hollywood era of American cinema. The team was composed of Englishman Stan Laurel...
- A laurel wreath is a symbol of victory and honor. It is a round wreath made of interlocking branches and leaves of the bay laurel (Laurus nobilis), an...
- include bay tree (esp. United Kingdom), bay laurel, sweet bay, true laurel, Grecian laurel, or simply laurel. Laurus nobilis figures prominently in cl****ical...
- "Yanny or Laurel" is an auditory illusion of a re-recording of a vocabulary word plus added background sounds, also mixed into the recording, which became...
- Laurel Lisa Holloman (born May 23, 1971) is an American painter and actress. She is best known for playing Tina Kennard in The L Word. Holloman is the...
- José P. Laurel, CCLH (born José Paciano Laurel y García; March 9, 1891 – November 6, 1959) was a Filipino politician and judge. He was the president of...
- The Nissan Laurel is a front-engine, rear-drive two- and four-door sedan manufactured and marketed by Nissan from 1969 to 2002. Introduced in 1968 as a...
- Salvador Roman Hidalgo Laurel (November 18, 1928 – January 27, 2004), also known as Doy Laurel, was a Filipino lawyer and politician who served as Vice-President...
Loading...