Definition of Magnetism. Meaning of Magnetism. Synonyms of Magnetism

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Magnetism. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Magnetism and, of course, Magnetism synonyms and on the right images related to the word Magnetism.

Definition of Magnetism

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Animal magnetism
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Biomagnetism
Biomagnetism Bi`o*mag"net*ism, n. [Gr. ? life + E. magnetism.] Animal magnetism.
Diamagnetism
Diamagnetism Di`a*mag"net*ism, n. 1. The science which treats of diamagnetic phenomena, and of the properties of diamagnetic bodies. 2. That form or condition of magnetic action which characterizes diamagnetics.
Electro-magnetism
Electro-magnetism E*lec`tro-mag"net*ism, n. The magnetism developed by a current of electricity; the science which treats of the development of magnetism by means of voltaic electricity, and of the properties or actions of the currents evolved.
Paramagnetism
Paramagnetism Par`a*mag"net*ism, n. Magnetism, as opposed to diamagnetism. --Faraday.
Photomagnetism
Photomagnetism Pho`to*mag"net*ism, n. The branch of science which treats of the relation of magnetism to light.
Phrenomagnetism
Phrenomagnetism Phre`no*mag"net*ism, n. [Gr. ?, ?, the mind + E. magnetism.] The power of exciting the organs of the brain by magnetic or mesmeric influence.
Remanent magnetism
Remanent Rem"a*nent, a. [L. remanens, p. pr. of remanere. See Remain, and cf. Remnant.] Remaining; residual. That little hope that is remanent hath its degree according to the infancy or growth of the habit. --Jer. Taylor. Remanent magnetism (Physics), magnetism which remains in a body that has little coercive force after the magnetizing force is withdrawn, as soft iron; -- called also residual magnetism.
Residual magnetism
Residual Re*sid"u*al (r?-z?d"?-al), a. [See Residue.] Pertaining to a residue; remaining after a part is taken. Residual air (Physiol.), that portion of air contained in the lungs which can not be expelled even by the most violent expiratory effort. It amounts to from 75 to 100 cubic inches. Cf. Supplemental air, under Supplemental. Residual error. (Mensuration) See Error, 6 (b) . Residual figure (Geom.), the figure which remains after a less figure has been taken from a greater one. Residual magnetism (Physics), remanent magnetism. See under Remanent. Residual product, a by product, as cotton waste from a cotton mill, coke and coal tar from gas works, etc. Residual quantity (Alg.), a binomial quantity the two parts of which are connected by the negative sign, as a-b. Residual root (Alg.), the root of a residual quantity, as [root](a-b).
residual magnetism
Remanent Rem"a*nent, a. [L. remanens, p. pr. of remanere. See Remain, and cf. Remnant.] Remaining; residual. That little hope that is remanent hath its degree according to the infancy or growth of the habit. --Jer. Taylor. Remanent magnetism (Physics), magnetism which remains in a body that has little coercive force after the magnetizing force is withdrawn, as soft iron; -- called also residual magnetism.
Thermomagnetism
Thermomagnetism Ther`mo*mag"net*ism, n. [Thermo- + magnetism.] Magnetism as affected or caused by the action of heat; the relation of heat to magnetism.

Meaning of Magnetism from wikipedia

- Magnetism is a cl**** of physical phenomena that are mediated by magnetic fields. Electric currents and the magnetic moments of elementary particles give...
- Animal magnetism, also known as mesmerism, was the name given by German doctor Franz Mesmer in the 18th century to what he believed to be an invisible...
- sometimes called the Lorentz force, which includes both electricity and magnetism as different manifestations of the same phenomenon. The electromagnetic...
- Magnetism is a phenomenon in physics by which materials exert an attractive or repulsive force on other materials. Magnetism may also refer to: Magnetism...
- Animal Magnetism is the seventh studio album by German rock band Scorpions, released in 1980. The RIAA certified the record as Gold on 8 March 1984, and...
- phenomenon of magnetism in magnets encountered in everyday life. Substances respond weakly to magnetic fields with three other types of magnetism—paramagnetism...
- Human magnetism is a po****r name for an alleged ability of some people to attract objects to their skin. People alleged to have such an ability are often...
- In physics, Gauss's law for magnetism is one of the four Maxwell's equations that underlie cl****ical electrodynamics. It states that the magnetic field...
- Rock magnetism is the study of the magnetic properties of rocks, sediments and soils. The field arose out of the need in paleomagnetism to understand...
- Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. Find sources: "Shim" magnetism – news · newspapers · books · scholar · JSTOR (June 2010) (Learn how and...
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