Definition of Indica. Meaning of Indica. Synonyms of Indica

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Definition of Indica

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C Indica
Canna Can"na, n. [L., a reed. See Cane.] (Bot.) A genus of tropical plants, with large leaves and often with showy flowers. The Indian shot (C. Indica) is found in gardens of the northern United States.
Cannabis Indica
Bhang Bhang, n. [Per. bang; cf. Skr. bhang[=a] hemp.] An astringent and narcotic drug made from the dried leaves and seed capsules of wild hemp (Cannabis Indica), and chewed or smoked in the East as a means of intoxication. See Hasheesh.
Cannabis Indica
Cannabis Can"na*bis, n. [L., hemp. See Canvas.] (Bot.) A genus of a single species belonging to the order Uricace[ae]; hemp. Cannabis Indica, the Indian hemp, a powerful narcotic, now considered a variety of the common hemp.
Coindication
Coindication Co*in`di*ca"tion, n. [Cf. F. co["i]dication.] One of several signs or symptoms indicating the same fact; as, a coindication of disease.
Contraindicant
Contraindicant Con"tra*in"di*cant, n. (Med.) Something, as a symptom, indicating that the usual mode of treatment is not to be followed. --Burke.
Contraindicate
Contraindicate Con"tra*in*"di*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Contraindicated; p. pr. & vb. n. Contraindicating.] (Med.) To indicate, as by a symptom, some method of treatment contrary to that which the general tenor of the case would seem to require. Contraindicating symptoms must be observed. --Harvey.
Contraindicated
Contraindicate Con"tra*in*"di*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Contraindicated; p. pr. & vb. n. Contraindicating.] (Med.) To indicate, as by a symptom, some method of treatment contrary to that which the general tenor of the case would seem to require. Contraindicating symptoms must be observed. --Harvey.
Contraindicating
Contraindicate Con"tra*in*"di*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Contraindicated; p. pr. & vb. n. Contraindicating.] (Med.) To indicate, as by a symptom, some method of treatment contrary to that which the general tenor of the case would seem to require. Contraindicating symptoms must be observed. --Harvey.
Contraindication
Contraindication Con"tra*in`di*ca"tion, n. (med.) An indication or symptom which forbids the method of treatment usual in such cases.
Counter indication
Counter Coun"ter, a. Contrary; opposite; contrasted; opposed; adverse; antagonistic; as, a counter current; a counter revolution; a counter poison; a counter agent; counter fugue. ``Innumerable facts attesting the counter principle.' --I. Taylor. Counter approach (Fort.), a trench or work pushed forward from defensive works to meet the approaches of besiegers. See Approach. Counter bond (Law), in old practice, a bond to secure one who has given bond for another. Counter brace. See Counter brace, in Vocabulary. Counter deed (Law), a secret writing which destroys, invalidates, or alters, a public deed. Counter distinction, contradistinction. [Obs.] Counter drain, a drain at the foot of the embankment of a canal or watercourse, for carrying off the water that may soak through. Counter extension (Surg.), the fixation of the upper part of a limb, while extension is practiced on the lower part, as in cases of luxation or fracture. Counter fissure (Surg.) Same as Contrafissure. Counter indication. (Med.) Same as Contraindication. Counter irritant (Med.), an irritant to produce a blister, a pustular eruption, or other irritation in some part of the body, in order to relieve an existing irritation in some other part. ``Counter irritants are of as great use in moral as in physical diseases.' --Macaulay. Counter irritation (Med.), the act or the result of applying a counter irritant. Counter opening, an aperture or vent on the opposite side, or in a different place. Counter parole (Mil.), a word in addition to the password, given in time of alarm as a signal. Counter plea (Law), a replication to a plea. --Cowell. Counter pressure, force or pressure that acts in a contrary direction to some other opposing pressure. Counter project, a project, scheme, or proposal brought forward in opposition to another, as in the negotiation of a treaty. --Swift. Counter proof, in engraving, a print taken off from another just printed, which, by being passed through the press, gives a copy in reverse, and of course in the same position as that of plate from which the first was printed, the object being to enable the engraver to inspect the state of the plate. Counter revolution, a revolution opposed to a former one, and restoring a former state of things. Counter revolutionist, one engaged in, or befriending, a counter revolution. Counter round (Mil.), a body of officers whose duty it is to visit and inspect the rounds and sentinels. Counter sea (Naut.), a sea running in an opposite direction from the wind. Counter sense, opposite meaning. Counter signal, a signal to answer or correspond to another. Counter signature, the name of a secretary or other officer countersigned to a writing. --Tooke. Counter slope, an overhanging slope; as, a wall with a counter slope. --Mahan. Counter statement, a statement made in opposition to, or denial of, another statement. Counter surety, a counter bond, or a surety to secure one who has given security. Counter tally, a tally corresponding to another. Counter tide, contrary tide.
Eleusine Indica
Wire Wire, n. [OE. wir, AS. wir; akin to Icel. v[=i]rr, Dan. vire, LG. wir, wire; cf. OHG. wiara fine gold; perhaps akin to E. withy. ????.] 1. A thread or slender rod of metal; a metallic substance formed to an even thread by being passed between grooved rollers, or drawn through holes in a plate of steel. Note: Wire is made of any desired form, as round, square, triangular, etc., by giving this shape to the hole in the drawplate, or between the rollers. 2. A telegraph wire or cable; hence, an electric telegraph; as, to send a message by wire. [Colloq.] Wire bed, Wire mattress, an elastic bed bottom or mattress made of wires interwoven or looped together in various ways. Wire bridge, a bridge suspended from wires, or cables made of wire. Wire cartridge, a shot cartridge having the shot inclosed in a wire cage. Wire cloth, a coarse cloth made of woven metallic wire, -- used for strainers, and for various other purposes. Wire edge, the thin, wirelike thread of metal sometimes formed on the edge of a tool by the stone in sharpening it. Wire fence, a fence consisting of posts with strained horizontal wires, wire netting, or other wirework, between. Wire gauge or gage. (a) A gauge for measuring the diameter of wire, thickness of sheet metal, etc., often consisting of a metal plate with a series of notches of various widths in its edge. (b) A standard series of sizes arbitrarily indicated, as by numbers, to which the diameter of wire or the thickness of sheet metal in usually made, and which is used in describing the size or thickness. There are many different standards for wire gauges, as in different countries, or for different kinds of metal, the Birmingham wire gauges and the American wire gauge being often used and designated by the abbreviations B. W. G. and A. W. G. respectively. Wire gauze, a texture of finely interwoven wire, resembling gauze. Wire grass (Bot.), either of the two common grasses Eleusine Indica, valuable for hay and pasture, and Poa compressa, or blue grass. See Blue grass. Wire grub (Zo["o]l.), a wireworm. Wire iron, wire rods of iron. Wire lathing, wire cloth or wire netting applied in the place of wooden lathing for holding plastering. Wire mattress. See Wire bed, above. Wire micrometer, a micrometer having spider lines, or fine wires, across the field of the instrument. Wire nail, a nail formed of a piece of wire which is headed and pointed. Wire netting, a texture of woven wire coarser than ordinary wire gauze. Wire rod, a metal rod from which wire is formed by drawing. Wire rope, a rope formed wholly, or in great part, of wires.
Eleusine Indica
Yard Yard, n. [OE. yard, yerd, AS. geard; akin to OFries. garda garden, OS. gardo garden, gard yard, D. gaard garden, G. garten, OHG. garto garden, gari inclosure, Icel. gar[eth]r yard, house, Sw. g[*a]rd, Dan. gaard, Goth. gards a house, garda sheepfold, L. hortus garden, Gr. cho`rtos an inclosure. Cf. Court, Garden, Garth, Horticulture, Orchard.] 1. An inclosure; usually, a small inclosed place in front of, or around, a house or barn; as, a courtyard; a cowyard; a barnyard. A yard . . . inclosed all about with sticks In which she had a cock, hight chanticleer. --Chaucer. 2. An inclosure within which any work or business is carried on; as, a dockyard; a shipyard. Liberty of the yard, a liberty, granted to persons imprisoned for debt, of walking in the yard, or within any other limits prescribed by law, on their giving bond not to go beyond those limits. Prison yard, an inclosure about a prison, or attached to it. Yard grass (Bot.), a low-growing grass (Eleusine Indica) having digitate spikes. It is common in dooryards, and like places, especially in the Southern United States. Called also crab grass. Yard of land. See Yardland.
Eleusine Indica
Bunch grass, grazing. Far West. Eriocoma, Festuca, Stips, etc. Chess, or Cheat, a weed. Bromus secalinus, etc. Couch grass. Same as Quick grass (below). Crab grass, (a) Hay, in South. A weed, in North. Panicum sanguinale. (b) Pasture and hay. South. Eleusine Indica. Darnel (a) Bearded, a noxious weed. Lolium temulentum. (b) Common. Same as Rye grass (below). Drop seed, fair for forage and hay. Muhlenbergia, several species. English grass. Same as Redtop (below). Fowl meadow grass. (a) Pasture and hay. Poa serotina. (b) Hay, on moist land. Gryceria nervata. Gama grass, cut fodder. South. Tripsacum dactyloides.
Ficus Indica
Banyan Ban"yan, n. [See Banian.] (Bot.) A tree of the same genus as the common fig, and called the Indian fig (Ficus Indica), whose branches send shoots to the ground, which take root and become additional trunks, until it may be the tree covers some acres of ground and is able to shelter thousands of men.
Ficus Indica
Bo tree Bo" tree` (Bot.) The peepul tree; esp., the very ancient tree standing at Anurajahpoora in Ceylon, grown from a slip of the tree under which Gautama is said to have received the heavenly light and so to have become Buddha. The sacred bo tree of the Buddhists (Ficus religiosa), which is planted close to every temple, and attracts almost as much veneration as the status of the god himself. . . . It differs from the banyan (Ficus Indica) by sending down no roots from its branches. --Tennent.
Ficus Indica
Ficus Fi"cus, n. [L., a fig.] A genus of trees or shrubs, one species of which (F. Carica) produces the figs of commerce; the fig tree. Note: Ficus Indica is the banyan tree; F. religiosa, the peepul tree; F. elastica, the India-rubber tree.
Indical
Indical In"dic*al, a. [From L. index, indicis, an index.] Indexical. [R.] --Fuller.
Indican
Indican In"di*can, n. [See Indigo.] 1. (Chem.) A glucoside obtained from woad (indigo plant) and other plants, as a yellow or light brown sirup. It has a nauseous bitter taste, a decomposes or drying. By the action of acids, ferments, etc., it breaks down into sugar and indigo. It is the source of natural indigo. 2. (Physiol. Chem.) An indigo-forming substance, found in urine, and other animal fluids, and convertible into red and blue indigo (urrhodin and uroglaucin). Chemically, it is indoxyl sulphate of potash, C8H6NSO4K, and is derived from the indol formed in the alimentary canal. Called also uroxanthin.
Indicant
Indicant In"di*cant, a. [L. indicans, p. pr. indicare. See Indicate.] Serving to point out, as a remedy; indicating.
Indicant
Indicant In"di*cant, n. That which indicates or points out; as, an indicant of the remedy for a disease.
Indicate
Indicate In"di*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Indicated; p. pr. & vb. n. Indicating.] [L. indicatus, p. p. of indicare to indicate; pref. in- in + dicare to proclaim; akin to dicere to say. See Diction, and cf. Indict, Indite.] 1. To point out; to discover; to direct to a knowledge of; to show; to make known. That turns and turns to indicate From what point blows the weather. --Cowper. 2. (Med.) To show or manifest by symptoms; to point to as the proper remedies; as, great prostration of strength indicates the use of stimulants. 3. (Mach.) To investigate the condition or power of, as of steam engine, by means of an indicator. Syn: To show; mark; signify; denote; discover; evidence; evince; manifest; declare; specify; explain; exhibit; present; reveal; disclose; display.
Indicated
Indicated In"di*ca`ted, a. Shown; denoted; registered; measured. Indicated power. See Indicated horse power, under Horse power.
Indicated
Indicate In"di*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Indicated; p. pr. & vb. n. Indicating.] [L. indicatus, p. p. of indicare to indicate; pref. in- in + dicare to proclaim; akin to dicere to say. See Diction, and cf. Indict, Indite.] 1. To point out; to discover; to direct to a knowledge of; to show; to make known. That turns and turns to indicate From what point blows the weather. --Cowper. 2. (Med.) To show or manifest by symptoms; to point to as the proper remedies; as, great prostration of strength indicates the use of stimulants. 3. (Mach.) To investigate the condition or power of, as of steam engine, by means of an indicator. Syn: To show; mark; signify; denote; discover; evidence; evince; manifest; declare; specify; explain; exhibit; present; reveal; disclose; display.
Indicated horse power
Horse power Horse" pow`er 1. The power which a horse exerts. 2. (Mach.) A unit of power, used in stating the power required to drive machinery, and in estimating the capabilities of animals or steam engines and other prime movers for doing work. It is the power required for the performance of work at the rate of 33,000 English units of work per minute; hence, it is the power that must be exerted in lifting 33,000 pounds at the rate of one foot per minute, or 550 pounds at the rate of one foot per second, or 55 pounds at the rate of ten feet per second, etc. Note: The power of a draught horse, of average strength, working eight hours per day, is about four fifths of a standard horse power. Brake horse power, the net effective power of a prime mover, as a steam engine, water wheel, etc., in horse powers, as shown by a friction brake. See Friction brake, under Friction. Indicated horse power, the power exerted in the cylinder of an engine, stated in horse powers, estimated from the diameter and speed of the piston, and the mean effective pressure upon it as shown by an indicator. See Indicator. Nominal horse power (Steam Engine), a term still sometimes used in England to express certain proportions of cylinder, but having no value as a standard of measurement. 3. A machine worked by a horse, for driving other machinery; a horse motor.
Indicated power
Indicated In"di*ca`ted, a. Shown; denoted; registered; measured. Indicated power. See Indicated horse power, under Horse power.
Indicating
Indicate In"di*cate, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Indicated; p. pr. & vb. n. Indicating.] [L. indicatus, p. p. of indicare to indicate; pref. in- in + dicare to proclaim; akin to dicere to say. See Diction, and cf. Indict, Indite.] 1. To point out; to discover; to direct to a knowledge of; to show; to make known. That turns and turns to indicate From what point blows the weather. --Cowper. 2. (Med.) To show or manifest by symptoms; to point to as the proper remedies; as, great prostration of strength indicates the use of stimulants. 3. (Mach.) To investigate the condition or power of, as of steam engine, by means of an indicator. Syn: To show; mark; signify; denote; discover; evidence; evince; manifest; declare; specify; explain; exhibit; present; reveal; disclose; display.
Indication
Indication In`di*ca"tion, n. [L. indicatio: cf. F. indication.] 1. Act of pointing out or indicating. 2. That which serves to indicate or point out; mark; token; sign; symptom; evidence. The frequent stops they make in the most convenient places are plain indications of their weariness. --Addison. 3. Discovery made; information. --Bentley. 4. Explanation; display. [Obs.] --Bacon. 5. (Med.) Any symptom or occurrence in a disease, which serves to direct to suitable remedies. Syn: Proof; demonstration; sign; token; mark; evidence; signal.
Indicative
Indicative In*dic"a*tive, n. (Gram.) The indicative mood.
Indicative
Indicative In*dic"a*tive, a. [L. indicativus: cf. F. indicatif.] 1. Pointing out; bringing to notice; giving intimation or knowledge of something not visible or obvious. That truth is productive of utility, and utility indicative of truth, may be thus proved. --Bp. Warburton. 2. (Fine Arts) Suggestive; representing the whole by a part, as a fleet by a ship, a forest by a tree, etc. Indicative mood (Gram.), that mood or form of the verb which indicates, that is, which simply affirms or denies or inquires; as, he writes; he is not writing; has the mail arrived?
Indicative mood
Indicative In*dic"a*tive, a. [L. indicativus: cf. F. indicatif.] 1. Pointing out; bringing to notice; giving intimation or knowledge of something not visible or obvious. That truth is productive of utility, and utility indicative of truth, may be thus proved. --Bp. Warburton. 2. (Fine Arts) Suggestive; representing the whole by a part, as a fleet by a ship, a forest by a tree, etc. Indicative mood (Gram.), that mood or form of the verb which indicates, that is, which simply affirms or denies or inquires; as, he writes; he is not writing; has the mail arrived?

Meaning of Indica from wikipedia

- Indica is cl****ical Gr**** and Latin for "of India". It may refer to: Indica (Arrian), Arrian's account of Nearchus' voyage from India Indica (Ctesias)...
- Cannabis indica is an annual plant in the Cannabaceae family. It is a ****tive species of the genus Cannabis. Whether it and Cannabis sativa are truly...
- The Tata Indica is a supermini car launched by the Indian manufacturer Tata Motors in 1998. It was the first p****enger car from Tata Motors and it is also...
- Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) is a leguminous tree (family Fabaceae) bearing edible fruit that is indigenous to tropical Africa. The genus Tamarindus is...
- Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, nimtree or Indian lilac, is a tree in the ****gany family Meliaceae. It is one of two species in the genus...
- Opuntia ficus-indica (prickly pear) is a species of cactus that has long been a domesticated crop plant grown in agricultural economies throughout arid...
- Mangifera indica, commonly known as mango, is a species of flowering plant in the sumac and poison ivy family Anacardiaceae. It is native to the Indian...
- The Indian giant squirrel, or Malabar giant squirrel, (Ratufa indica) is a large tree squirrel species in the genus Ratufa native to India. It is a large-bodied...
- is disputed. Three species may be recognized: Cannabis sativa, Cannabis indica, and Cannabis ruderalis; C. ruderalis may be included within C. sativa;...
- short-grained ****onica or sinica variety, and the nonsticky, long-grained indica rice [ja] variety. ****onica varieties are usually cultivated in dry fields...
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