Definition of Diction. Meaning of Diction. Synonyms of Diction

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Definition of Diction

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Addiction
Addiction Ad*dic"tion, n. [Cf. L. addictio an adjudging.] The state of being addicted; devotion; inclination. ``His addiction was to courses vain.' --Shak.
Benedictional
Benedictional Ben`e*dic"tion*al, n. A book of benedictions.
Contentious jurisdiction
Contentious Con*ten"tious, a. [L. contentiosus: cf. F. contentieux.] 1. Fond of contention; given to angry debate; provoking dispute or contention; quarrelsome. Despotic and contentious temper. --Macaulay. 2. Relating to contention or strife; involving or characterized by contention. --Spenser. More cheerful, though not less contentious, regions. --Brougham. 3. (Law) Contested; litigated; litigious; having power to decide controversy. Contentious jurisdiction (Eng. Eccl. Law), jurisdiction over matters in controversy between parties, in contradistinction to voluntary jurisdiction, or that exercised upon matters not opposed or controverted. Syn: Quarrelsome; pugnacious; dissentious; wrangling; litigious; perverse; peevish. -- Con*ten"tious*ly, adv. -- Con*ten"tious*ness, n.
Contradiction
Contradiction Con`tra*dic"tion, n. [L. contradictio answer, objection: cf. F. contradiction.] 1. An assertion of the contrary to what has been said or affirmed; denial of the truth of a statement or assertion; contrary declaration; gainsaying. His fair demands Shall be accomplished without contradiction. --Shak. 2. Direct opposition or repugnancy; inconsistency; incongruity or contrariety; one who, or that which, is inconsistent. can be make deathless death? That were to make Strange contradiction. --Milton. We state our experience and then we come to a manly resolution of acting in contradiction to it. --Burke. Both parts of a contradiction can not possibly be true. --Hobbes. Of contradictions infinite the slave. --Wordsworth. Principle of contradiction (Logic), the axiom or law of thought that a thing cannot be and not be at the same time, or a thing must either be or not be, or the same attribute can not at the same time be affirmed and and denied of the same subject. Note: It develops itself in three specific forms which have been called the ``Three Logical Axioms.' First, ``A is A.' Second, ``A is not Not-A' Third, ``Everything is either A or Not-A.'
Contradictional
Contradictional Con`tra*dic"tion*al, a. Contradictory; inconsistent; opposing. [R.] --Milton.
Contradictions
Contradictions Con`tra*dic"tions, a. 1. Filled with contradictions; inconsistent. [Obs.] 2. Inclined to contradict or cavil [Obs.] --Sharp. -- Con`tra*dic"tious*ness, n. --Norris.
Cycle of indiction
Cycle of indiction, a period of 15 years, employed in Roman and ecclesiastical chronology, not founded on any astronomical period, but having reference to certain judicial acts which took place at stated epochs under the Greek emperors. Cycle of the moon, or Metonic cycle, a period of 19 years, after the lapse of which the new and full moon returns to the same day of the year; -- so called from Meton, who first proposed it. Cycle of the sun, Solar cycle, a period of 28 years, at the end of which time the days of the month return to the same days of the week. The dominical or Sunday letter follows the same order; hence the solar cycle is also called the cycle of the Sunday letter. In the Gregorian calendar the solar cycle is in general interrupted at the end of the century.
Dictionalrian
Dictionalrian Dic`tion*al"ri*an, n. A lexicographer. [R.]
Dictionaries
Dictionary Dic"tion*a*ry, n.; pl. Dictionaries. [Cf. F. dictionnaire. See Diction.] 1. A book containing the words of a language, arranged alphabetically, with explanations of their meanings; a lexicon; a vocabulary; a wordbook. I applied myself to the perusal of our writers; and noting whatever might be of use to ascertain or illustrate any word or phrase, accumulated in time the materials of a dictionary. --Johnson. 2. Hence, a book containing the words belonging to any system or province of knowledge, arranged alphabetically; as, a dictionary of medicine or of botany; a biographical dictionary.
Dictionary
Dictionary Dic"tion*a*ry, n.; pl. Dictionaries. [Cf. F. dictionnaire. See Diction.] 1. A book containing the words of a language, arranged alphabetically, with explanations of their meanings; a lexicon; a vocabulary; a wordbook. I applied myself to the perusal of our writers; and noting whatever might be of use to ascertain or illustrate any word or phrase, accumulated in time the materials of a dictionary. --Johnson. 2. Hence, a book containing the words belonging to any system or province of knowledge, arranged alphabetically; as, a dictionary of medicine or of botany; a biographical dictionary.
Extradictionary
Extradictionary Ex`tra*dic"tion*a*ry, a. [Pref. extra- + L. dictio a saying. See Diction.] Consisting not in words, but in realities. [Obs.] Of these extradictionary and real fallacies, Aristotle and logicians make in number six. --Sir T. Browne.
Indiction
Indiction In*dic"tion, n. [L. indictio: cf. F. indiction. See Indict, Indite.] 1. Declaration; proclamation; public notice or appointment. [Obs.] ``Indiction of a war.' --Bacon. Secular princes did use to indict, or permit the indiction of, synods of bishops. --Jer. Taylor. 2. A cycle of fifteen years. Note: This mode of reckoning time is said to have been introduced by Constantine the Great, in connection with the payment of tribute. It was adopted at various times by the Greek emperors of Constantinople, the popes, and the parliaments of France. Through the influence of the popes, it was extensively used in the ecclesiastical chronology of the Middle Ages. The number of indictions was reckoned at first from 312 a. d., but since the twelfth century it has been reckoned from the birth of Christ. The papal indiction is the only one ever used at the present day. To find the indiction and year of the indiction by the first method, subtract 312 from the given year a. d., and divide by 15; by the second method, add 3 to the given year a. d., and the divide by 15. In either case, the quotient is the number of the current indiction, and the remainder the year of the indiction. See Cycle of indiction, under Cycle.
Interdiction
Interdiction In`ter*dic"tion, n. [L. interdictio: cf. F. interdiction.] The act of interdicting; prohibition; prohibiting decree; curse; interdict. The truest issue of thy throne By his own interdiction stands accurst. --Shak.
Jurisdictional
Jurisdictional Ju`ris*dic"tion*al, a. [Cf. LL. jurisdictionalis, F. juridictionnel.] Of or pertaining to jurisdiction; as jurisdictional rights. --Barrow.
Predictional
Predictional Pre*dic"tion*al, a. Prophetic; prognostic. [R.]
Principle of contradiction
Contradiction Con`tra*dic"tion, n. [L. contradictio answer, objection: cf. F. contradiction.] 1. An assertion of the contrary to what has been said or affirmed; denial of the truth of a statement or assertion; contrary declaration; gainsaying. His fair demands Shall be accomplished without contradiction. --Shak. 2. Direct opposition or repugnancy; inconsistency; incongruity or contrariety; one who, or that which, is inconsistent. can be make deathless death? That were to make Strange contradiction. --Milton. We state our experience and then we come to a manly resolution of acting in contradiction to it. --Burke. Both parts of a contradiction can not possibly be true. --Hobbes. Of contradictions infinite the slave. --Wordsworth. Principle of contradiction (Logic), the axiom or law of thought that a thing cannot be and not be at the same time, or a thing must either be or not be, or the same attribute can not at the same time be affirmed and and denied of the same subject. Note: It develops itself in three specific forms which have been called the ``Three Logical Axioms.' First, ``A is A.' Second, ``A is not Not-A' Third, ``Everything is either A or Not-A.'
Valediction
Valediction Val`e*dic"tion, n. [L., valedicere, valedictum, to say farewell; vale farewell (imperative of valere to be strong or well) + dicere to say. See Valiant, Diction.] A farewell; a bidding farewell. --Donne.

Meaning of Diction from wikipedia

- Diction (Latin: dictionem (nom. dictio), "a saying, expression, word"), in its original meaning, is a writer's or speaker's distinctive vocabulary choices...
- Poetic diction is the term used to refer to the linguistic style, the vocabulary, and the metaphors used in the writing of poetry. In the Western tradition...
- literature. After finishing his B. Litt., which became his third book Poetic Diction, he was a dedicated poet and author for over ten years. After 1934 his...
- Macaronic language uses a mixture of languages, particularly bilingual puns or situations in which the languages are otherwise used in the same context...
- Purity of Diction in English Verse was written by Donald Davie and first published by Chatto & Windus in 1952. It was Davie's first book, and was followed...
- of ambiguity, symbolism, irony, and other stylistic elements of poetic diction often leaves a poem open to multiple interpretations. Similarly, figures...
- element that goes into generating mood is diction, that is, the choice and style of words the writer uses. Diction conveys a sensibility as well as portrays...
- Layar Terkembang (With Sails Unfurled) is an Indonesian novel by Sutan Takdir Alisjahbana. Published in 1936 or 1937 by Balai Pustaka, it tells the story...
- Rapping (or rhyming, spitting, emceeing, or MCing) is a musical form of vocal delivery that incorporates "rhyme, rhythmic speech, and street vernacular"...
- Eat a Bowl of Tea is a 1961 novel by Louis Chu. It was the first Chinese American novel set in Chinese America.[dubious – discuss] Because of its portrayal...
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