Definition of Anima. Meaning of Anima. Synonyms of Anima

Definition of Anima. Meaning of Anima. Synonyms of Anima

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Anima. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Anima and, of course, Anima synonyms and on the right images related to the word Anima.

Definition of Anima

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Animadversal
Animadversal An`i*mad*ver"sal, n. The faculty of perceiving; a percipient. [Obs.] --Dr. H. More.
Animadversion
Animadversion An`i*mad*ver"sion, n. [L. animadversio, fr. animadvertere: cf. F. animadversion. See Animadvert.] 1. The act or power of perceiving or taking notice; direct or simple perception. [Obs.] The soul is the sole percipient which hath animadversion and sense, properly so called. --Glanvill. 2. Monition; warning. [Obs.] --Clarendon. 3. Remarks by way of criticism and usually of censure; adverse criticism; reproof; blame. He dismissed their commissioners with severe and sharp animadversions. --Clarendon. 4. Judicial cognizance of an offense; chastisement; punishment. [Archaic] ``Divine animadversions.' --Wesley. Syn: Stricture; criticism; censure; reproof; blame; comment.
Animadversive
Animadversive An`i*mad*ver"sive, a. Having the power of perceiving; percipient. [Archaic] --Glanvill. I do not mean there is a certain number of ideas glaring and shining to the animadversive faculty. --Coleridge.
Animadvert
Animadvert An`i*mad*vert", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Animadverted; p. pr. & vb. n. Animadverting.] [L. animadvertere; animus mind + advertere to turn to; ad to + vertere to turn.] 1. To take notice; to observe; -- commonly followed by that. --Dr. H. More. 2. To consider or remark by way of criticism or censure; to express censure; -- with on or upon. I should not animadvert on him . . . if he had not used extreme severity in his judgment of the incomparable Shakespeare. --Dryden. 3. To take cognizance judicially; to inflict punishment. [Archaic] --Grew. Syn: To remark; comment; criticise; censure.
Animadverted
Animadvert An`i*mad*vert", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Animadverted; p. pr. & vb. n. Animadverting.] [L. animadvertere; animus mind + advertere to turn to; ad to + vertere to turn.] 1. To take notice; to observe; -- commonly followed by that. --Dr. H. More. 2. To consider or remark by way of criticism or censure; to express censure; -- with on or upon. I should not animadvert on him . . . if he had not used extreme severity in his judgment of the incomparable Shakespeare. --Dryden. 3. To take cognizance judicially; to inflict punishment. [Archaic] --Grew. Syn: To remark; comment; criticise; censure.
Animadverter
Animadverter An`i*mad*vert"er, n. One who animadverts; a censurer; also [Obs.], a chastiser.
Animadverting
Animadvert An`i*mad*vert", v. i. [imp. & p. p. Animadverted; p. pr. & vb. n. Animadverting.] [L. animadvertere; animus mind + advertere to turn to; ad to + vertere to turn.] 1. To take notice; to observe; -- commonly followed by that. --Dr. H. More. 2. To consider or remark by way of criticism or censure; to express censure; -- with on or upon. I should not animadvert on him . . . if he had not used extreme severity in his judgment of the incomparable Shakespeare. --Dryden. 3. To take cognizance judicially; to inflict punishment. [Archaic] --Grew. Syn: To remark; comment; criticise; censure.
Animal
Animal An"i*mal, n. [L., fr. anima breath, soul: cf. F. animal. See Animate.] 1. An organized living being endowed with sensation and the power of voluntary motion, and also characterized by taking its food into an internal cavity or stomach for digestion; by giving carbonic acid to the air and taking oxygen in the process of respiration; and by increasing in motive power or active aggressive force with progress to maturity. 2. One of the lower animals; a brute or beast, as distinguished from man; as, men and animals.
Animal
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Animal charcoal
Charcoal Char"coal`, n. [See Char, v. t., to burn or to reduce to coal, and Coal.] 1. Impure carbon prepared from vegetable or animal substances; esp., coal made by charring wood in a kiln, retort, etc., from which air is excluded. It is used for fuel and in various mechanical, artistic, and chemical processes. 2. (Fine Arts) Finely prepared charcoal in small sticks, used as a drawing implement. Animal charcoal, a fine charcoal prepared by calcining bones in a closed vessel; -- used as a filtering agent in sugar refining, and as an absorbent and disinfectant. Charcoal blacks, the black pigment, consisting of burnt ivory, bone, cock, peach stones, and other substances. Charcoal drawing (Fine Arts), a drawing made with charcoal. See Charcoal, 2. Until within a few years this material has been used almost exclusively for preliminary outline, etc., but at present many finished drawings are made with it. Charcoal point, a carbon pencil prepared for use in an electric light apparatus. Mineral charcoal, a term applied to silky fibrous layers of charcoal, interlaminated in beds of ordinary bituminous coal; -- known to miners as mother of coal.
Animal electricity
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Animal flower
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Animal flower
Note: If we examine a common flower, such for instance as a geranium, we shall find that it consists of: First, an outer envelope or calyx, sometimes tubular, sometimes consisting of separate leaves called sepals; secondly, an inner envelope or corolla, which is generally more or less colored, and which, like the calyx, is sometimes tubular, sometimes composed of separate leaves called petals; thirdly, one or more stamens, consisting of a stalk or filament and a head or anther, in which the pollen is produced; and fourthly, a pistil, which is situated in the center of the flower, and consists generally of three principal parts; one or more compartments at the base, each containing one or more seeds; the stalk or style; and the stigma, which in many familiar instances forms a small head, at the top of the style or ovary, and to which the pollen must find its way in order to fertilize the flower. --Sir J. Lubbock. 3. The fairest, freshest, and choicest part of anything; as, the flower of an army, or of a family; the state or time of freshness and bloom; as, the flower of life, that is, youth. The choice and flower of all things profitable the Psalms do more briefly contain. --Hooker. The flower of the chivalry of all Spain. --Southey. A simple maiden in her flower Is worth a hundred coats of arms. --Tennyson. 4. Grain pulverized; meal; flour. [Obs.] The flowers of grains, mixed with water, will make a sort of glue. --Arbuthnot. 5. pl. (Old. Chem.) A substance in the form of a powder, especially when condensed from sublimation; as, the flowers of sulphur. 6. A figure of speech; an ornament of style. 7. pl. (Print.) Ornamental type used chiefly for borders around pages, cards, etc. --W. Savage. 8. pl. Menstrual discharges. --Lev. xv. 24. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.) See under Animal. Cut flowers, flowers cut from the stalk, as for making a bouquet. Flower bed, a plat in a garden for the cultivation of flowers. Flower beetle (Zo["o]l.), any beetle which feeds upon flowers, esp. any one of numerous small species of the genus Meligethes, family Nitidulid[ae], some of which are injurious to crops. Flower bird (Zo["o]l.), an Australian bird of the genus Anthornis, allied to the honey eaters. Flower bud, an unopened flower. Flower clock, an assemblage of flowers which open and close at different hours of the day, thus indicating the time. Flower head (Bot.), a compound flower in which all the florets are sessile on their receptacle, as in the case of the daisy. Flower pecker (Zo["o]l.), one of a family (Dic[ae]id[ae]) of small Indian and Australian birds. They resemble humming birds in habits. Flower piece. (a) A table ornament made of cut flowers. (b) (Fine Arts) A picture of flowers. Flower stalk (Bot.), the peduncle of a plant, or the stem that supports the flower or fructification.
animal flowers
Actinia Ac*tin"i*a, n.; pl. L. Actini[ae], E. Actinias. [Latinized fr. Gr. ?, ?, ray.] (Zo["o]l.) (a) An animal of the class Anthozoa, and family Actinid[ae]. From a resemblance to flowers in form and color, they are often called animal flowers and sea anemones. [See Polyp.]. (b) A genus in the family Actinid[ae].
Animal force
Force Force, n. [F. force, LL. forcia, fortia, fr. L. fortis strong. See Fort, n.] 1. Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; especially, power to persuade, or convince, or impose obligation; pertinency; validity; special signification; as, the force of an appeal, an argument, a contract, or a term. He was, in the full force of the words, a good man. --Macaulay. 2. Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion. Which now they hold by force, and not by right. --Shak. 3. Strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; -- an armament; troops; warlike array; -- often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation. Is Lucius general of the forces? --Shak. 4. (Law) (a) Strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; violence. (b) Validity; efficacy. --Burrill. 5. (Physics) Any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally, which changes, or tends to change, any physical relation between them, whether mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic, or of any other kind; as, the force of gravity; cohesive force; centrifugal force. Animal force (Physiol.), muscular force or energy. Catabiotic force [Gr. ? down (intens.) + ? life.] (Biol.), the influence exerted by living structures on adjoining cells, by which the latter are developed in harmony with the primary structures. Centrifugal force, Centripetal force, Coercive force, etc. See under Centrifugal, Centripetal, etc. Composition of forces, Correlation of forces, etc. See under Composition, Correlation, etc. Force and arms [trans. of L. vi et armis] (Law), an expression in old indictments, signifying violence. In force, or Of force, of unimpaired efficacy; valid; of full virtue; not suspended or reversed. ``A testament is of force after men are dead.' --Heb. ix. 17. Metabolic force (Physiol.), the influence which causes and controls the metabolism of the body. No force, no matter of urgency or consequence; no account; hence, to do no force, to make no account of; not to heed. [Obs.] --Chaucer. Of force, of necessity; unavoidably; imperatively. ``Good reasons must, of force, give place to better.' --Shak. Plastic force (Physiol.), the force which presumably acts in the growth and repair of the tissues. Vital force (Physiol.), that force or power which is inherent in organization; that form of energy which is the cause of the vital phenomena of the body, as distinguished from the physical forces generally known. Syn: Strength; vigor; might; energy; stress; vehemence; violence; compulsion; coaction; constraint; coercion. Usage: Force, Strength. Strength looks rather to power as an inward capability or energy. Thus we speak of the strength of timber, bodily strength, mental strength, strength of emotion, etc. Force, on the other hand, looks more to the outward; as, the force of gravitation, force of circumstances, force of habit, etc. We do, indeed, speak of strength of will and force of will; but even here the former may lean toward the internal tenacity of purpose, and the latter toward the outward expression of it in action. But, though the two words do in a few cases touch thus closely on each other, there is, on the whole, a marked distinction in our use of force and strength. ``Force is the name given, in mechanical science, to whatever produces, or can produce, motion.' --Nichol. Thy tears are of no force to mollify This flinty man. --Heywood. More huge in strength than wise in works he was. --Spenser. Adam and first matron Eve Had ended now their orisons, and found Strength added from above, new hope to spring Out of despair. --Milton.
Animal heat
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Animal kingdom
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Animal magnetism
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Animal spirits
Spirit Spir"it, n. [OF. espirit, esperit, F. esprit, L. spiritus, from spirare to breathe, to blow. Cf. Conspire, Expire, Esprit, Sprite.] 1. Air set in motion by breathing; breath; hence, sometimes, life itself. [Obs.] ``All of spirit would deprive.' --Spenser. The mild air, with season moderate, Gently attempered, and disposed eo well, That still it breathed foorth sweet spirit. --Spenser. 2. A rough breathing; an aspirate, as the letter h; also, a mark to denote aspiration; a breathing. [Obs.] Be it a letter or spirit, we have great use for it. --B. Jonson. 3. Life, or living substance, considered independently of corporeal existence; an intelligence conceived of apart from any physical organization or embodiment; vital essence, force, or energy, as distinct from matter. 4. The intelligent, immaterial and immortal part of man; the soul, in distinction from the body in which it resides; the agent or subject of vital and spiritual functions, whether spiritual or material. There is a spirit in man; and the inspiration of the Almighty giveth them understanding. --Job xxxii. 8. As the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also. --James ii. 26. Spirit is a substance wherein thinking, knowing, doubting, and a power of moving, do subsist. --Locke. 5. Specifically, a disembodied soul; the human soul after it has left the body. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was, and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it. --Eccl. xii. 7. Ye gentle spirits far away, With whom we shared the cup of grace. --Keble. 6. Any supernatural being, good or bad; an apparition; a specter; a ghost; also, sometimes, a sprite,; a fairy; an elf. Whilst young, preserve his tender mind from all impressions of spirits and goblins in the dark. --Locke. 7. Energy, vivacity, ardor, enthusiasm, courage, etc. ``Write it then, quickly,' replied Bede; and summoning all his spirits together, like the last blaze of a candle going out, he indited it, and expired. --Fuller. 8. One who is vivacious or lively; one who evinces great activity or peculiar characteristics of mind or temper; as, a ruling spirit; a schismatic spirit. Such spirits as he desired to please, such would I choose for my judges. --Dryden. 9. Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; -- often in the plural; as, to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be downhearted, or in bad spirits. God has . . . made a spirit of building succeed a spirit of pulling down. --South. A perfect judge will read each work of wit With the same spirit that its author writ. --Pope. 10. Intent; real meaning; -- opposed to the letter, or to formal statement; also, characteristic quality, especially such as is derived from the individual genius or the personal character; as, the spirit of an enterprise, of a document, or the like. 11. Tenuous, volatile, airy, or vapory substance, possessed of active qualities. All bodies have spirits . . . within them. --Bacon. 12. Any liquid produced by distillation; especially, alcohol, the spirits, or spirit, of wine (it having been first distilled from wine): -- often in the plural. 13. pl. Rum, whisky, brandy, gin, and other distilled liquors having much alcohol, in distinction from wine and malt liquors. 14. (Med.) A solution in alcohol of a volatile principle. Cf. Tincture. --U. S. Disp. 15. (Alchemy) Any one of the four substances, sulphur, sal ammoniac, quicksilver, or arsenic (or, according to some, orpiment). The four spirits and the bodies seven. --Chaucer. 16. (Dyeing) Stannic chloride. See under Stannic. Note: Spirit is sometimes joined with other words, forming compounds, generally of obvious signification; as, spirit-moving, spirit-searching, spirit-stirring, etc. Astral spirits, Familiar spirits, etc. See under Astral, Familiar, etc. Animal spirits. (a) (Physiol.) The fluid which at one time was supposed to circulate through the nerves and was regarded as the agent of sensation and motion; -- called also the nervous fluid, or nervous principle. (b) Physical health and energy; frolicsomeness; sportiveness. Ardent spirits, strong alcoholic liquors, as brandy, rum, whisky, etc., obtained by distillation. Holy Spirit, or The Spirit (Theol.), the Spirit of God, or the third person of the Trinity; the Holy Ghost. The spirit also signifies the human spirit as influenced or animated by the Divine Spirit. Proof spirit. (Chem.) See under Proof. Rectified spirit (Chem.), spirit rendered purer or more concentrated by redistillation, so as to increase the percentage of absolute alcohol. Spirit butterfly (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of delicate butterflies of tropical America belonging to the genus Ithomia. The wings are gauzy and nearly destitute of scales. Spirit duck. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The buffle-headed duck. (b) The golden-eye. Spirit lamp (Art), a lamp in which alcohol or methylated spirit is burned. Spirit level. See under Level. Spirit of hartshorn. (Old Chem.) See under Hartshorn. Spirit of Mindererus (Med.), an aqueous solution of acetate of ammonium; -- named after R. Minderer, physician of Augsburg. Spirit of nitrous ether (Med. Chem.), a pale yellow liquid, of a sweetish taste and a pleasant ethereal odor. It is obtained by the distillation of alcohol with nitric and sulphuric acids, and consists essentially of ethyl nitrite with a little acetic aldehyde. It is used as a diaphoretic, diuretic, antispasmodic, etc. Called also sweet spirit of niter. Spirit of salt (Chem.), hydrochloric acid; -- so called because obtained from salt and sulphuric acid. [Obs.] Spirit of sense, the utmost refinement of sensation. [Obs.] --Shak. Spirits, or Spirit, of turpentine (Chem.), rectified oil of turpentine, a transparent, colorless, volatile, and very inflammable liquid, distilled from the turpentine of the various species of pine; camphine. See Camphine. Spirit of vitriol (Chem.), sulphuric acid; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of green vitriol. [Obs.] Spirit of vitriolic ether (Chem.) ether; -- often but incorrectly called sulphuric ether. See Ether. [Obs.] Spirits, or Spirit, of wine (Chem.), alcohol; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of wine. Spirit rapper, one who practices spirit rapping; a ``medium' so called. Spirit rapping, an alleged form of communication with the spirits of the dead by raps. See Spiritualism, 3. Sweet spirit of niter. See Spirit of nitrous ether, above.
Animal spirits
Animal An"i*mal, a. [Cf. F. animal.] 1. Of or relating to animals; as, animal functions. 2. Pertaining to the merely sentient part of a creature, as distinguished from the intellectual, rational, or spiritual part; as, the animal passions or appetites. 3. Consisting of the flesh of animals; as, animal food. Animal magnetism. See Magnetism and Mesmerism. Animal electricity, the electricity developed in some animals, as the electric eel, torpedo, etc. Animal flower (Zo["o]l.), a name given to certain marine animals resembling a flower, as any species of actinia or sea anemone, and other Anthozoa, hydroids, starfishes, etc. Animal heat (Physiol.), the heat generated in the body of a living animal, by means of which the animal is kept at nearly a uniform temperature. Animal spirits. See under Spirit. Animal kingdom, the whole class of beings endowed with animal life. It embraces several subkingdoms, and under these there are Classes, Orders, Families, Genera, Species, and sometimes intermediate groupings, all in regular subordination, but variously arranged by different writers. Note: The following are the grand divisions, or subkingdoms, and the principal classes under them, generally recognized at the present time:
Animalcula
Animalculum An`i*mal"cu*lum, n.; pl. Animalcula. [NL. See Animalcule.] An animalcule. Note: Animalcul[ae], as if from a Latin singular animalcula, is a barbarism.
Animalcular
Animalcular An`i*mal"cu*lar, Animalculine An`i*mal"cu*line, a. Of, pertaining to, or resembling, animalcules. ``Animalcular life.' --Tyndall.
Animalcule
Animalcule An`i*mal"cule, n. [As if fr. a L. animalculum, dim. of animal.] 1. A small animal, as a fly, spider, etc. [Obs.] --Ray. 2. (Zo["o]l.) An animal, invisible, or nearly so, to the naked eye. See Infusoria. Note: Many of the so-called animalcules have been shown to be plants, having locomotive powers something like those of animals. Among these are Volvox, the Desmidiac[ae], and the siliceous Diatomace[ae]. Spermatic animalcules. See Spermatozoa.
Animalculine
Animalcular An`i*mal"cu*lar, Animalculine An`i*mal"cu*line, a. Of, pertaining to, or resembling, animalcules. ``Animalcular life.' --Tyndall.
Animalculism
Animalculism An`i*mal"cu*lism, n. (Biol.) The theory that the spermatozo["o]n and not the ovum contains the whole of the embryo; spermatism; -- opposed to ovism.
Animalculism
Animalculism An`i*mal"cu*lism, n. [Cf. F. animalculisme.] (Biol.) The theory which seeks to explain certain physiological and pathological phenomena by means of animalcules.
Animalculist
Animalculist An`i*mal"cu*list, n. [Cf. F. animalculiste.] 1. One versed in the knowledge of animalcules. --Keith. 2. A believer in the theory of animalculism.
Animalculum
Animalculum An`i*mal"cu*lum, n.; pl. Animalcula. [NL. See Animalcule.] An animalcule. Note: Animalcul[ae], as if from a Latin singular animalcula, is a barbarism.
Animalish
Animalish An"i*mal*ish, a. Like an animal.
Animalism
Animalism An"i*mal*ism, n. [Cf. F. animalisme.] The state, activity, or enjoyment of animals; mere animal life without intellectual or moral qualities; sensuality.

Meaning of Anima from wikipedia

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