Definition of Manga. Meaning of Manga. Synonyms of Manga

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Definition of Manga

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Black manganese
Manganese Man`ga*nese", n. [F. mangan[`e]se, It. manganese, sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of its resemblance to the magnet. See Magnet, and cf. Magnesia.] (Chem.) An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8. Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese) is used to increase the density and hardness of steel. Black oxide of manganese, Manganese dioxide or peroxide, or Black manganese (Chem.), a heavy black powder MnO2, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly manganese. It colors glass violet, and is used as a decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass. Manganese bronze, an alloy made by adding from one to two per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in brass.
Black oxide of manganese
Manganese Man`ga*nese", n. [F. mangan[`e]se, It. manganese, sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of its resemblance to the magnet. See Magnet, and cf. Magnesia.] (Chem.) An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8. Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese) is used to increase the density and hardness of steel. Black oxide of manganese, Manganese dioxide or peroxide, or Black manganese (Chem.), a heavy black powder MnO2, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly manganese. It colors glass violet, and is used as a decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass. Manganese bronze, an alloy made by adding from one to two per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in brass.
gray manganese ore
Manganite Man"ga*nite, n. 1. (Min.) One of the oxides of manganese; -- called also gray manganese ore. It occurs in brilliant steel-gray or iron-black crystals, also massive. 2. (Chem.) A compound of manganese dioxide with a metallic oxide; so called as though derived from the hypothetical manganous acid.
mangaby
Mamgabey Mam"ga*bey, n. [So called by Buffon from Mangaby, in Madagascar, where he erroneously supposed them be native.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several African monkeys of the genus Cercocebus, as the sooty mangabey (C. fuliginosus), which is sooty black. [Also written mangaby.]
Mangan
Mangan Man"gan, n. See Mangonel.
Manganate
Manganate Man"ga*nate, n. [Cf. F. manganate.] (Chem.) A salt of manganic acid. Note: The manganates are usually green, and are wellknown compounds, though derived from a hypothetical acid.
Manganesate
Manganesate Man`ga*ne"sate, n. (Chem.) A manganate. [Obs.]
Manganese
Manganese Man`ga*nese", n. [F. mangan[`e]se, It. manganese, sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of its resemblance to the magnet. See Magnet, and cf. Magnesia.] (Chem.) An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8. Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese) is used to increase the density and hardness of steel. Black oxide of manganese, Manganese dioxide or peroxide, or Black manganese (Chem.), a heavy black powder MnO2, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly manganese. It colors glass violet, and is used as a decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass. Manganese bronze, an alloy made by adding from one to two per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in brass.
manganese
Manganese Man`ga*nese", n. [F. mangan[`e]se, It. manganese, sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of its resemblance to the magnet. See Magnet, and cf. Magnesia.] (Chem.) An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8. Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese) is used to increase the density and hardness of steel. Black oxide of manganese, Manganese dioxide or peroxide, or Black manganese (Chem.), a heavy black powder MnO2, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly manganese. It colors glass violet, and is used as a decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass. Manganese bronze, an alloy made by adding from one to two per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in brass.
Manganese bronze
Manganese Man`ga*nese", n. [F. mangan[`e]se, It. manganese, sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of its resemblance to the magnet. See Magnet, and cf. Magnesia.] (Chem.) An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8. Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese) is used to increase the density and hardness of steel. Black oxide of manganese, Manganese dioxide or peroxide, or Black manganese (Chem.), a heavy black powder MnO2, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly manganese. It colors glass violet, and is used as a decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass. Manganese bronze, an alloy made by adding from one to two per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in brass.
Manganese dioxide or peroxide
Manganese Man`ga*nese", n. [F. mangan[`e]se, It. manganese, sasso magnesio; prob. corrupted from L. magnes, because of its resemblance to the magnet. See Magnet, and cf. Magnesia.] (Chem.) An element obtained by reduction of its oxide, as a hard, grayish white metal, fusible with difficulty, but easily oxidized. Its ores occur abundantly in nature as the minerals pyrolusite, manganite, etc. Symbol Mn. Atomic weight 54.8. Note: An alloy of manganese with iron (called ferromanganese) is used to increase the density and hardness of steel. Black oxide of manganese, Manganese dioxide or peroxide, or Black manganese (Chem.), a heavy black powder MnO2, occurring native as the mineral pyrolusite, and valuable as a strong oxidizer; -- called also familiarly manganese. It colors glass violet, and is used as a decolorizer to remove the green tint of impure glass. Manganese bronze, an alloy made by adding from one to two per cent of manganese to the copper and zinc used in brass.
Manganese steel
Manganese steel Man`ga*nese" steel Cast steel containing a considerable percentage of manganese, which makes it very hard and tough. See Alloy steel, above.
Manganesious
Manganesious Man`ga*ne"sious, a. (Chem.) Manganous.
Manganesium
Manganesium Man`ga*ne"si*um, n. [NL.] Manganese.
Manganesous
Manganesous Man`ga*ne"sous, a. (Chem.) Manganous.
Manganic
Manganic Man`gan"ic, a. [Cf. F. manganique.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to resembling, or containing, manganese; specif., designating compounds in which manganese has a higher valence as contrasted with manganous compounds. Cf. Manganous. Manganic acid, an acid, H2MnO4, formed from manganese, analogous to sulphuric acid.
Manganic acid
Manganic Man`gan"ic, a. [Cf. F. manganique.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to resembling, or containing, manganese; specif., designating compounds in which manganese has a higher valence as contrasted with manganous compounds. Cf. Manganous. Manganic acid, an acid, H2MnO4, formed from manganese, analogous to sulphuric acid.
Manganiferous
Manganiferous Man`ga*nif"er*ous, a. [Manganese + -ferous.] Containing manganese.
Manganite
Manganite Man"ga*nite, n. 1. (Min.) One of the oxides of manganese; -- called also gray manganese ore. It occurs in brilliant steel-gray or iron-black crystals, also massive. 2. (Chem.) A compound of manganese dioxide with a metallic oxide; so called as though derived from the hypothetical manganous acid.
Manganium
Manganium Man*ga"ni*um, n. [NL.] Manganese.
Manganous
Manganous Man"ga*nous, a. (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, designating, those compounds of manganese in which the element has a lower valence as contrasted with manganic compounds; as, manganous oxide. Manganous acid, a hypothetical compound analogous to sulphurous acid, and forming the so-called manganites.
Manganous acid
Manganous Man"ga*nous, a. (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, designating, those compounds of manganese in which the element has a lower valence as contrasted with manganic compounds; as, manganous oxide. Manganous acid, a hypothetical compound analogous to sulphurous acid, and forming the so-called manganites.
Permanganate
Permanganate Per*man"ga*nate, n. (Chem.) A salt of permanganic acid. Potassium permanganate. (Chem.) See Potassium permanganate, under Potassium.
Permanganic
Permanganic Per`man*gan"ic, a. (Chem.) Pertaining to, or designating, one of the higher acids of manganese, HMnO4, which forms salts called permanganates.
Potassium permanganate
Permanganate Per*man"ga*nate, n. (Chem.) A salt of permanganic acid. Potassium permanganate. (Chem.) See Potassium permanganate, under Potassium.
Potassium permanganate
Potassium Po*tas"si*um, n. [NL. See Potassa, Potash.] (Chem.) An Alkali element, occurring abundantly but always combined, as in the chloride, sulphate, carbonate, or silicate, in the minerals sylvite, kainite, orthoclase, muscovite, etc. Atomic weight 39.0. Symbol K (Kalium). Note: It is reduced from the carbonate as a soft white metal, lighter than water, which oxidizes with the greatest readiness, and, to be preserved, must be kept under liquid hydrocarbons, as naphtha or kerosene. Its compounds are very important, being used in glass making, soap making, in fertilizers, and in many drugs and chemicals. Potassium permanganate, the salt KMnO4, crystallizing in dark red prisms having a greenish surface color, and dissolving in water with a beautiful purple red color; -- used as an oxidizer and disinfectant. The name chameleon mineral is applied to this salt and also to potassium manganate. Potassium bitartrate. See Cream of tartar, under Cream.
potassium permanganate
Chameleon Cha*me"le*on (k[.a]*m[=e]"l[-e]*[u^]n), n. [L. Chamaeleon, Gr. chamaile`wn, lit., ``ground lion;' chamai` on the ground + le`wn lion. See Humble, and Lion.] (Zo["o]l.) A lizardlike reptile of the genus Cham[ae]leo, of several species, found in Africa, Asia, and Europe. The skin is covered with fine granulations; the tail is prehensile, and the body is much compressed laterally, giving it a high back. Note: Its color changes more or less with the color of the objects about it, or with its temper when disturbed. In a cool, dark place it is nearly white, or grayish; on admitting the light, it changes to brown, bottle-green, or blood red, of various shades, and more or less mottled in arrangment. The American chameleons belong to Anolis and allied genera of the family Iguanid[ae]. They are more slender in form than the true chameleons, but have the same power of changing their colors. Chameleon mineral (Chem.), the compound called potassium permanganate, a dark violet, crystalline substance, KMnO4, which in formation passes through a peculiar succession of color from green to blue, purple, red, etc. See Potassium permanganate, under Potassium.
Red manganese
Red horse. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any large American red fresh-water sucker, especially Moxostoma macrolepidotum and allied species. (b) See the Note under Drumfish. Red lead. (Chem) See under Lead, and Minium. Red-lead ore. (Min.) Same as Crocoite. Red liquor (Dyeing), a solution consisting essentially of aluminium acetate, used as a mordant in the fixation of dyestuffs on vegetable fiber; -- so called because used originally for red dyestuffs. Called also red mordant. Red maggot (Zo["o]l.), the larva of the wheat midge. Red manganese. (Min.) Same as Rhodochrosite. Red man, one of the American Indians; -- so called from his color. Red maple (Bot.), a species of maple (Acer rubrum). See Maple. Red mite. (Zo["o]l.) See Red spider, below. Red mulberry (Bot.), an American mulberry of a dark purple color (Morus rubra). Red mullet (Zo["o]l.), the surmullet. See Mullet. Red ocher (Min.), a soft earthy variety of hematite, of a reddish color. Red perch (Zo["o]l.), the rosefish. Red phosphorus. (Chem.) See under Phosphorus. Red pine (Bot.), an American species of pine (Pinus resinosa); -- so named from its reddish bark. Red precipitate. See under Precipitate. Red Republican (European Politics), originally, one who maintained extreme republican doctrines in France, -- because a red liberty cap was the badge of the party; an extreme radical in social reform. [Cant] Red ribbon, the ribbon of the Order of the Bath in England. Red sanders. (Bot.) See Sanders. Red sandstone. (Geol.) See under Sandstone. Red scale (Zo["o]l.), a scale insect (Aspidiotus aurantii) very injurious to the orange tree in California and Australia. Red silver (Min.), an ore of silver, of a ruby-red or reddish black color. It includes proustite, or light red silver, and pyrargyrite, or dark red silver. Red snapper (Zo["o]l.), a large fish (Lutlanus aya or Blackfordii) abundant in the Gulf of Mexico and about the Florida reefs. Red snow, snow colored by a mocroscopic unicellular alga (Protococcus nivalis) which produces large patches of scarlet on the snows of arctic or mountainous regions. Red softening (Med.) a form of cerebral softening in which the affected parts are red, -- a condition due either to infarction or inflammation. Red spider (Zo["o]l.), a very small web-spinning mite (Tetranychus telarius) which infests, and often destroys, plants of various kinds, especially those cultivated in houses and conservatories. It feeds mostly on the under side of the leaves, and causes them to turn yellow and die. The adult insects are usually pale red. Called also red mite. Red squirrel (Zo["o]l.), the chickaree. Red tape, the tape used in public offices for tying up documents, etc.; hence, official formality and delay.

Meaning of Manga from wikipedia

- Manga (漫画, Manga) are comics created in ****an or by creators in the ****anese language, conforming to a style developed in ****an in the late 19th century...
- Manga refers to ****anese comic books or comic strip. Manga may also refer to Manga, Minas Gerais, a muni****lity in Brazil Manga, Burkina Faso, a town...
- Seinen manga (青年漫画) are manga marketed toward young adult men. In ****anese, the word "seinen" literally means "youth," but the term "seinen manga" is also...
- Shōnen, shonen, or shounen manga (少年漫画, shōnen manga) is manga aimed at a teenage male target-demographic readership. The age group varies with individual...
- Bleach (****anese: ブリーチ, Hepburn: Burīchi) is a ****anese manga series written and illustrated by Tite Kubo. Bleach follows the adventures of the hotheaded...
- Manga (漫画, Manga) are comics created in ****an. The following is a list of the best-selling manga series to date. This list is limited to ****anese manga...
- Sins (****anese: 七つの大罪, Hepburn: Nanatsu no Taizai) is a ****anese fantasy manga series written and illustrated by Nakaba Suzuki. It has been serialized...
- (****anese: 戦国御伽草子 犬夜叉, Hepburn: Sengoku Otogizōshi Inuyasha), is a ****anese manga series written and illustrated by Rumiko Takahashi. It premiered in W****ly...
- Shōjo, shojo, or shoujo manga (少女漫画, shōjo manga) is manga aimed at a teenage female target-demographic readership. The name romanizes the ****anese 少女...
- Berserk (****anese: ベルセルク, Hepburn: Beruseruku) is a ****anese manga series written and illustrated by Kentaro Miura. Set in a medieval Europe-inspired...
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