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A aepypterus
Note: The common or sea lamprey of America and Europe (Petromyzon marinus), which in spring ascends rivers to spawn, is considered excellent food by many, and is sold as a market fish in some localities. The smaller river lampreys mostly belong to the genus Ammoc[oe]les, or Lampetra, as A. fluviatilis, of Europe, and A. [ae]pypterus of America. All lampreys attach themselves to other fishes, as parasites, by means of the suckerlike mouth.
A affinis
2. (Zo["o]l.) A scaup duck. See below. Scaup duck (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of northern ducks of the genus Aythya, or Fuligula. The adult males are, in large part, black. The three North American species are: the greater scaup duck (Aythya marila, var. nearctica), called also broadbill, bluebill, blackhead, flock duck, flocking fowl, and raft duck; the lesser scaup duck (A. affinis), called also little bluebill, river broadbill, and shuffler; the tufted, or ring-necked, scaup duck (A. collaris), called also black jack, ringneck, ringbill, ringbill shuffler, etc. See Illust.. of Ring-necked duck, under Ring-necked. The common European scaup, or mussel, duck (A. marila), closely resembles the American variety.
A agrestis
Vole Vole, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of micelike rodents belonging to Arvicola and allied genera of the subfamily Arvicolin[ae]. They have a thick head, short ears, and a short hairy tail. Note: The water vole, or water rat, of Europe (Arvicola amphibius) is a common large aquatic species. The short-tailed field vole (A. agrestis) of Northern and Central Europe, and Asia, the Southern field vole (A. arvalis), and the Siberian root vole (A. [oe]conomus), are important European species. The common species of the Eastern United States (A. riparius) (called also meadow mouse) and the prairie mouse (A. austerus) are abundant, and often injurious to vegetation. Other species are found in Canada.
A alba
Egret E"gret, n. [See Aigret, Heron.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) The name of several species of herons which bear plumes on the back. They are generally white. Among the best known species are the American egret (Ardea, or Herodias, egretta); the great egret (A. alba); the little egret (A. garzetta), of Europe; and the American snowy egret (A. candidissima). A bunch of egrets killed for their plumage. --G. W. Cable. 2. A plume or tuft of feathers worn as a part of a headdress, or anything imitating such an ornament; an aigrette. 3. (Bot.) The flying feathery or hairy crown of seeds or achenes, as the down of the thistle. 4. (Zo["o]l.) A kind of ape.
A alnifolia
Shad Shad (sh[a^]d), n. sing. & pl. [AS. sceadda a kind of fish, akin to Prov. G. schade; cf. Ir. & Gael. sgadan a herring, W. ysgadan herrings; all perhaps akin to E. skate a fish.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of food fishes of the Herring family. The American species (Clupea sapidissima), which is abundant on the Atlantic coast and ascends the larger rivers in spring to spawn, is an important market fish. The European allice shad, or alose (C. alosa), and the twaite shad. (C. finta), are less important species. [Written also chad.] Note: The name is loosely applied, also, to several other fishes, as the gizzard shad (see under Gizzard), called also mud shad, white-eyed shad, and winter shad. Hardboaded, or Yellow-tailed, shad, the menhaden. Hickory, or Tailor, shad, the mattowacca. Long-boned shad, one of several species of important food fishes of the Bermudas and the West Indies, of the genus Gerres. Shad bush (Bot.), a name given to the North American shrubs or small trees of the rosaceous genus Amelanchier (A. Canadensis, and A. alnifolia) Their white racemose blossoms open in April or May, when the shad appear, and the edible berries (pomes) ripen in June or July, whence they are called Juneberries. The plant is also called service tree, and Juneberry. Shad frog, an American spotted frog (Rana halecina); -- so called because it usually appears at the time when the shad begin to run in the rivers. Trout shad, the squeteague. White shad, the common shad.
A Americana
Maguey Mag"uey, n. [Sp. maguey, Mexican maguei and metl.] (Bot.) The century plant, a species of Agave (A. Americana). See Agave.
A Americana
Widgeon Widg"eon, n. [Probably from an old French form of F. vigeon, vingeon, gingeon; of uncertain origin; cf. L. vipio, -onis, a kind of small crane.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of fresh-water ducks, especially those belonging to the subgenus Mareca, of the genus Anas. The common European widgeon (Anas penelope) and the American widgeon (A. Americana) are the most important species. The latter is called also baldhead, baldpate, baldface, baldcrown, smoking duck, wheat, duck, and whitebelly. Bald-faced, or Green-headed, widgeon, the American widgeon. Black widgeon, the European tufted duck. Gray widgeon. (a) The gadwall. (b) The pintail duck. Great headed widgeon, the poachard. Pied widgeon. (a) The poachard. (b) The goosander. Saw-billed widgeon, the merganser. Sea widgeon. See in the Vocabulary. Spear widgeon, the goosander. [Prov. Eng.] Spoonbilled widgeon, the shoveler. White widgeon, the smew. Wood widgeon, the wood duck.
A Americana
Agave A*ga"ve, n. [L. Agave, prop. name, fr. Gr. ?, fem. of ? illustrious, noble.] (bot.) A genus of plants (order Amaryllidace[ae]) of which the chief species is the maguey or century plant (A. Americana), wrongly called Aloe. It is from ten to seventy years, according to climate, in attaining maturity, when it produces a gigantic flower stem, sometimes forty feet in height, and perishes. The fermented juice is the pulque of the Mexicans; distilled, it yields mescal. A strong thread and a tough paper are made from the leaves, and the wood has many uses.
A Americanus
Lant Lant, n. [Cf. Lance.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small, slender, marine fishes of the genus Ammedytes. The common European species (A. tobianus) and the American species (A. Americanus) live on sandy shores, buried in the sand, and are caught in large quantities for bait. Called also launce, and sand eel.
A Americanus
Moose Moose, n. [A native name; Knisteneaux mouswah; Algonquin monse. Mackenzie.] (Zo["o]l.) A large cervine mammal (Alces machlis, or A. Americanus), native of the Northern United States and Canada. The adult male is about as large as a horse, and has very large, palmate antlers. It closely resembles the European elk, and by many zo["o]logists is considered the same species. See Elk. Moose bird (Zo["o]l.), the Canada jayor whisky jack. See Whisky jack. Moose deer. Same as Moose. Moose yard (Zo["o]l.), a locality where moose, in winter, herd together in a forest to feed and for mutual protection.
A arborea
Lark Lark, n. [OE. larke, laverock, AS. l[=a]werce; akin to D. leeuwerik, LG. lewerke, OHG. l?rahha, G. lerche, Sw. l["a]rka, Dan. lerke, Icel. l[ae]virki.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one numerous species of singing birds of the genus Alauda and allied genera (family Alaudid[ae]). They mostly belong to Europe, Asia, and Northern Africa. In America they are represented by the shore larks, or horned by the shore larks, or horned larks, of the genus Otocoris. The true larks have holaspidean tarsi, very long hind claws, and usually, dull, sandy brown colors. Note: The European skylark, or lark of the poets (Alauda arvensis), is of a brown mottled color, and is noted for its clear and sweet song, uttered as it rises and descends almost perpendicularly in the air. It is considered a table delicacy, and immense numbers are killed for the markets. Other well-known European species are the crested, or tufted, lark (Alauda cristata), and the wood lark (A. arborea). The pipits, or titlarks, of the genus Anthus (family Motacillid[ae]) are often called larks. See Pipit. The American meadow larks, of the genus Sturnella, are allied to the starlings. See Meadow Lark. The Australian bush lark is Mirafra Horsfieldii. See Shore lark. Lark bunting (Zo["o]l.), a fringilline bird (Calamospiza melanocorys) found on the plains of the Western United States. Lark sparrow (Zo["o]l.), a sparrow (Chondestes grammacus), found in the Mississippi Valley and the Western United States.
A artemisiaefolia
Bitterweed Bit"ter*weed`, n. (Bot.) A species of Ambrosia (A. artemisi[ae]folia); Roman worm wood. --Gray.
A arvalis
Vole Vole, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of micelike rodents belonging to Arvicola and allied genera of the subfamily Arvicolin[ae]. They have a thick head, short ears, and a short hairy tail. Note: The water vole, or water rat, of Europe (Arvicola amphibius) is a common large aquatic species. The short-tailed field vole (A. agrestis) of Northern and Central Europe, and Asia, the Southern field vole (A. arvalis), and the Siberian root vole (A. [oe]conomus), are important European species. The common species of the Eastern United States (A. riparius) (called also meadow mouse) and the prairie mouse (A. austerus) are abundant, and often injurious to vegetation. Other species are found in Canada.
A arvensis
Pimpernel Pim"per*nel, n. [F. pimprenelle; cf. Sp. pimpinela, It. pimpinella; perh. from LL. bipinnella, for bipinnula two-winged, equiv. to L. bipennis; bis twice + penna feather, wing. Cf. Pen a feather.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus Anagallis, of which one species (A. arvensis) has small flowers, usually scarlet, but sometimes purple, blue, or white, which speedily close at the approach of bad weather. Water pimpernel. (Bot.) See Brookweed.
A Ascalonium
Rocambole Roc"am*bole, n. [F.] [Written also rokambole.] (Bot.) A name of Allium Scorodoprasum and A. Ascalonium, two kinds of garlic, the latter of which is also called shallot.
A athamanticum
Male Male, a. [F. m[^a]le, OF. masle, mascle, fr. L. masculus male, masculine, dim. of mas a male; possibly akin to E. man. Cf. Masculine, Marry, v. t.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sex that begets or procreates young, or (in a wider sense) to the sex that produces spermatozoa, by which the ova are fertilized; not female; as, male organs. 2. (Bot.) Capable of producing fertilization, but not of bearing fruit; -- said of stamens and antheridia, and of the plants, or parts of plants, which bear them. 3. Suitable to the male sex; characteristic or suggestive of a male; masculine; as, male courage. 4. Consisting of males; as, a male choir. 5. (Mech.) Adapted for entering another corresponding piece (the female piece) which is hollow and which it fits; as, a male gauge, for gauging the size or shape of a hole; a male screw, etc. Male berry (Bot.), a kind of coffee. See Pea berry. Male fern (Bot.), a fern of the genus Aspidium (A. Filixmas), used in medicine as an anthelmintic, esp. against the tapeworm. Aspidium marginale in America, and A. athamanticum in South Africa, are used as good substitutes for the male fern in medical practice. See Female fern, under Female. Male rhyme, a rhyme in which only the last syllables agree, as laid, afraid, dismayed. See Female rhyme, under Female. Male screw (Mech.), a screw having threads upon its exterior which enter the grooves upon the inside of a corresponding nut or female screw. Male thread, the thread of a male screw.
A atricapillus
Goshawk Gos"hawk`, n. [AS. g?shafuc, lit., goosehawk; or Icel. g[=a]shaukr. See Goose, and Hawk the bird.] (Zo["o]l.) Any large hawk of the genus Astur, of which many species and varieties are known. The European (Astur palumbarius) and the American (A. atricapillus) are the best known species. They are noted for their powerful flight, activity, and courage. The Australian goshawk (A. Nov[ae]-Hollandi[ae]) is pure white.
A aurea
Colicroot Col"ic*root`, n. A bitter American herb of the Bloodwort family, with the leaves all radical, and the small yellow or white flowers in a long spike (Aletris farinosa and A. aurea). Called sometimes star grass, blackroot, blazing star, and unicorn root.
A austerus
Vole Vole, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of micelike rodents belonging to Arvicola and allied genera of the subfamily Arvicolin[ae]. They have a thick head, short ears, and a short hairy tail. Note: The water vole, or water rat, of Europe (Arvicola amphibius) is a common large aquatic species. The short-tailed field vole (A. agrestis) of Northern and Central Europe, and Asia, the Southern field vole (A. arvalis), and the Siberian root vole (A. [oe]conomus), are important European species. The common species of the Eastern United States (A. riparius) (called also meadow mouse) and the prairie mouse (A. austerus) are abundant, and often injurious to vegetation. Other species are found in Canada.
A australis
Kivikivi Ki`vi*ki"vi, Kiwikiwi Ki`wi*ki"wi, n.; pl. Kivikivies (?), Kiwikiwies. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of Apteryx, esp. A. australis; -- so called in imitation of its notes. Called also kiwi. See Apteryx.
A B C
A B C A B C" ([=a] b[=e] s[=e]"). 1. The first three letters of the alphabet, used for the whole alphabet. 2. A primer for teaching the alphabet and first elements of reading. [Obs.] 3. The simplest rudiments of any subject; as, the A B C of finance. A B C book, a primer. --Shak.
A B C book
A B C A B C" ([=a] b[=e] s[=e]"). 1. The first three letters of the alphabet, used for the whole alphabet. 2. A primer for teaching the alphabet and first elements of reading. [Obs.] 3. The simplest rudiments of any subject; as, the A B C of finance. A B C book, a primer. --Shak.
A balsamifera
Poison Poi"son, n. [F. poison, in Old French also, a potion, fr. L. potio a drink, draught, potion, a poisonous draught, fr. potare to drink. See Potable, and cf. Potion.] 1. Any agent which, when introduced into the animal organism, is capable of producing a morbid, noxious, or deadly effect upon it; as, morphine is a deadly poison; the poison of pestilential diseases. 2. That which taints or destroys moral purity or health; as, the poison of evil example; the poison of sin. Poison ash. (Bot.) (a) A tree of the genus Amyris (A. balsamifera) found in the West Indies, from the trunk of which a black liquor distills, supposed to have poisonous qualities. (b) The poison sumac (Rhus venenata). [U. S.] Poison dogwood (Bot.), poison sumac. Poison fang (Zo["o]l.), one of the superior maxillary teeth of some species of serpents, which, besides having the cavity for the pulp, is either perforated or grooved by a longitudinal canal, at the lower end of which the duct of the poison gland terminates. See Illust. under Fang. Poison gland (Biol.), a gland, in animals or plants, which secretes an acrid or venomous matter, that is conveyed along an organ capable of inflicting a wound. Poison hemlock (Bot.), a poisonous umbelliferous plant (Conium maculatum). See Hemlock. Poison ivy (Bot.), a poisonous climbing plant (Rhus Toxicodendron) of North America. It is common on stone walls and on the trunks of trees, and has trifoliate, rhombic-ovate, variously notched leaves. Many people are poisoned by it, if they touch the leaves. See Poison sumac. Called also poison oak, and mercury. Poison nut. (Bot.) (a) Nux vomica. (b) The tree which yields this seed (Strychnos Nuxvomica). It is found on the Malabar and Coromandel coasts. Poison oak (Bot.), the poison ivy; also, the more shrubby Rhus diversiloba of California and Oregon. Poison sac. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Poison gland, above. See Illust. under Fang. Poison sumac (Bot.), a poisonous shrub of the genus Rhus (R. venenata); -- also called poison ash, poison dogwood, and poison elder. It has pinnate leaves on graceful and slender common petioles, and usually grows in swampy places. Both this plant and the poison ivy (Rhus Toxicodendron) have clusters of smooth greenish white berries, while the red-fruited species of this genus are harmless. The tree (Rhus vernicifera) which yields the celebrated Japan lacquer is almost identical with the poison sumac, and is also very poisonous. The juice of the poison sumac also forms a lacquer similar to that of Japan. Syn: Venom; virus; bane; pest; malignity. Usage: Poison, Venom. Poison usually denotes something received into the system by the mouth, breath, etc. Venom is something discharged from animals and received by means of a wound, as by the bite or sting of serpents, scorpions, etc. Hence, venom specifically implies some malignity of nature or purpose.
A barbara
Harvesting Har"vest*ing, a. & n., from Harvest, v. t. Harvesting ant (Zo["o]l.), any species of ant which gathers and stores up seeds for food. Many species are known. Note: The species found in Southern Europe and Palestine are Aphenogaster structor and A. barbara; that of Texas, called agricultural ant, is Pogonomyrmex barbatus or Myrmica molifaciens; that of Florida is P. crudelis. See Agricultural ant, under Agricultural.
A beating wind
Beat Beat, v. i. 1. To strike repeatedly; to inflict repeated blows; to knock vigorously or loudly. The men of the city . . . beat at the door. --Judges. xix. 22. 2. To move with pulsation or throbbing. A thousand hearts beat happily. --Byron. 3. To come or act with violence; to dash or fall with force; to strike anything, as, rain, wind, and waves do. Sees rolling tempests vainly beat below. --Dryden. They [winds] beat at the crazy casement. --Longfellow. The sun beat upon the head of Jonah, that he fainted, and wisbed in himself to die. --Jonah iv. 8. Public envy seemeth to beat chiefly upon ministers. --Bacon. 4. To be in agitation or doubt. [Poetic] To still my beating mind. --Shak. 5. (Naut.) To make progress against the wind, by sailing in a zigzag line or traverse. 6. To make a sound when struck; as, the drums beat. 7. (Mil.) To make a succession of strokes on a drum; as, the drummers beat to call soldiers to their quarters. 8. (Acoustics & Mus.) To sound with more or less rapid alternations of greater and less intensity, so as to produce a pulsating effect; -- said of instruments, tones, or vibrations, not perfectly in unison. A beating wind (Naut.), a wind which necessitates tacking in order to make progress. To beat about, to try to find; to search by various means or ways. --Addison. To beat about the bush, to approach a subject circuitously. To beat up and down (Hunting), to run first one way and then another; -- said of a stag. To beat up for recruits, to go diligently about in order to get helpers or participators in an enterprise.
A belladonna
Belladonna Bel`la*don"na, n. [It., literally fine lady; bella beautiful + donna lady.] (Bot.) (a) An herbaceous European plant (Atropa belladonna) with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berries. The whole plant and its fruit are very poisonous, and the root and leaves are used as powerful medicinal agents. Its properties are largely due to the alkaloid atropine which it contains. Called also deadly nightshade. (b) A species of Amaryllis (A. belladonna); the belladonna lily.
A bevel angle
Bevel Bev"el, a. 1. Having the slant of a bevel; slanting. 2. Hence: Morally distorted; not upright. [Poetic] I may be straight, though they themselves be bevel. --Shak. A bevel angle, any angle other than one of 90[deg]. Bevel wheel, a cogwheel whose working face is oblique to the axis. --Knight.
a bifilar
Bifilar Bi*fi"lar, a. [Pref. bi- + filar.] Two-threaded; involving the use of two threads; as, bifilar suspension; a bifilar balance. Bifilar micrometer (often called a bifilar), an instrument form measuring minute distances or angles by means of two very minute threads (usually spider lines), one of which, at least, is movable; -- more commonly called a filar micrometer.
A bispinosa
Natal plum Na*tal" plum` (Bot.) The drupaceous fruit of two South African shrubs of the genus Arduina (A. bispinosa and A. grandiflora).
A blind boil
Boil Boil, n. [Influenced by boil, v. See Beal, Bile.] A hard, painful, inflamed tumor, which, on suppuration, discharges pus, mixed with blood, and discloses a small fibrous mass of dead tissue, called the core. A blind boil, one that suppurates imperfectly, or fails to come to a head. Delhi boil (Med.), a peculiar affection of the skin, probably parasitic in origin, prevailing in India (as among the British troops) and especially at Delhi.

Meaning of A from wikipedia

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