Definition of Anthus. Meaning of Anthus. Synonyms of Anthus

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Definition of Anthus

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Ailanthus
Ailanthus Ai*lan"thus, n. Same as Ailantus.
Amaranthus
Amaranthus Am`a*ran"thus ([a^]m`[.a]*r[a^]n"th[u^]s), Amarantus Am`a*ran"tus ([a^]m`[.a]*r[a^]n"t[u^]s), n. Same as Amaranth.
Andropogon Shoenanthus
Lemon Lem"on (l[e^]m"[u^]n), n. [F. limon, Per. l[imac]m[=u]n; cf. Ar. laim[=u]n, Sp. limon, It. limone. Cf. Lime a fruit.] 1. (Bot.) An oval or roundish fruit resembling the orange, and containing a pulp usually intensely acid. It is produced by a tropical tree of the genus Citrus, the common fruit known in commerce being that of the species C. Limonum or C. Medica (var. Limonum). There are many varieties of the fruit, some of which are sweet. 2. The tree which bears lemons; the lemon tree. Lemon grass (Bot.), a fragrant East Indian grass (Andropogon Sh[oe]nanthus, and perhaps other allied species), which yields the grass oil used in perfumery. Lemon sole (Zo["o]l.), a yellow European sole (Solea aurantiaca). Salts of lemon (Chem.), a white crystalline substance, inappropriately named, as it consists of an acid potassium oxalate and contains no citric acid, which is the characteristic acid of lemon; -- called also salts of sorrel. It is used in removing ink stains. See Oxalic acid, under Oxalic. [Colloq.]
Anthus obscurus
Sea lark Sea" lark` (Zo["o]l.) (a) The rock pipit (Anthus obscurus). (b) Any one of several small sandpipers and plovers, as the ringed plover, the turnstone, the dunlin, and the sanderling.
Anthus obscurus
Shore Shore, n. [OE. schore, AS. score, probably fr. scieran, and so meaning properly, that which is shorn off, edge; akin to OD. schoore, schoor. See Shear, v. t.] The coast or land adjacent to a large body of water, as an ocean, lake, or large river. Michael Cassio, Lieutenant to the warlike Moor Othello, Is come shore. --Shak. The fruitful shore of muddy Nile. --Spenser. In shore, near the shore. --Marryat. On shore. See under On. Shore birds (Zo["o]l.), a collective name for the various limicoline birds found on the seashore. Shore crab (Zo["o]l.), any crab found on the beaches, or between tides, especially any one of various species of grapsoid crabs, as Heterograpsus nudus of California. Shore lark (Zo["o]l.), a small American lark (Otocoris alpestris) found in winter, both on the seacoast and on the Western plains. Its upper parts are varied with dark brown and light brown. It has a yellow throat, yellow local streaks, a black crescent on its breast, a black streak below each eye, and two small black erectile ear tufts. Called also horned lark. Shore plover (Zo["o]l.), a large-billed Australian plover (Esacus magnirostris). It lives on the seashore, and feeds on crustaceans, etc. Shore teetan (Zo["o]l.), the rock pipit (Anthus obscurus). [Prov. Eng.]
Anthus Pensilvanicus
Pipit Pip"it, n. [So named from its call note.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of small singing birds belonging to Anthus and allied genera, of the family Motacillid[ae]. They strongly resemble the true larks in habits, colors, and the great length of the hind claw. They are, therefore, often called titlarks, and pipit larks. Note: The meadow pipit (Anthus pratensis); the tree pipit, or tree lark (A. trivialis); and the rock pipit, or sea lark (A. obscurus) are well-known European species. The common American pipit, or brown lark, is Anthus Pensilvanicus. The Western species (A. Spraguei) is called the American skylark, on account of its musical powers.
Anthus pratensis
Pipit Pip"it, n. [So named from its call note.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of small singing birds belonging to Anthus and allied genera, of the family Motacillid[ae]. They strongly resemble the true larks in habits, colors, and the great length of the hind claw. They are, therefore, often called titlarks, and pipit larks. Note: The meadow pipit (Anthus pratensis); the tree pipit, or tree lark (A. trivialis); and the rock pipit, or sea lark (A. obscurus) are well-known European species. The common American pipit, or brown lark, is Anthus Pensilvanicus. The Western species (A. Spraguei) is called the American skylark, on account of its musical powers.
Anthus pratensis
Titlark Tit"lark`, n. [Tit a small bird + lark.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous small spring birds belonging to Anthus, Corydalla, and allied genera, which resemble the true larks in color and in having a very long hind claw; especially, the European meadow pipit (Anthus pratensis).
Anthus Spraguei
Skylark Sky"lark`, n. (Zo["o]l.) A lark that mounts and sings as it files, especially the common species (Alauda arvensis) found in Europe and in some parts of Asia, and celebrated for its melodious song; -- called also sky laverock. See under Lark. Note: The Australian skylark (Cincloramphus cantillans) is a pipit which has the habit of ascending perpendicularly like a skylark, but it lacks the song of a true lark. The Missouri skylark is a pipit (Anthus Spraguei) of the Western United States, resembling the skylark in habit and song.
Calycanthus floridus
Allspice All"spice`, n. The berry of the pimento (Eugenia pimenta), a tree of the West Indies; a spice of a mildly pungent taste, and agreeably aromatic; Jamaica pepper; pimento. It has been supposed to combine the flavor of cinnamon, nutmegs, and cloves; and hence the name. The name is also given to other aromatic shrubs; as, the Carolina allspice (Calycanthus floridus); wild allspice (Lindera benzoin), called also spicebush, spicewood, and feverbush.
Canthus
Canthus Can"thus, n.; pl. Canthi. [NL., fr. Gr. ?.] (Anat.) The corner where the upper and under eyelids meet on each side of the eye.
Cephalacanthus spinarella
Batfish Bat"fish`, n. (Zo["o]l.) A name given to several species of fishes: (a) The Malthe vespertilio of the Atlantic coast. (b) The flying gurnard of the Atlantic (Cephalacanthus spinarella). (c) The California batfish or sting ray (Myliobatis Californicus.)
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Buttonbush But"ton*bush`, n. (Bot.) A shrub (Cephalanthus occidentalis) growing by the waterside; -- so called from its globular head of flowers. See Capitulum.
Cheiranthus
Wallflower Wall"flow`er, n. 1. (Bot.) A perennial, cruciferous plant (Cheiranthus Cheiri), with sweet-scented flowers varying in color from yellow to orange and deep red. In Europe it very common on old walls. Note: The name is sometimes extended to other species of Cheiranthus and of the related genus Erysimum, especially the American Western wallflower (Erysimum asperum), a biennial herb with orange-yellow flowers. 2. A lady at a ball, who, either from choice, or because not asked to dance, remains a spectator. [Colloq.]
Cheiranthus Cheiri
Wallflower Wall"flow`er, n. 1. (Bot.) A perennial, cruciferous plant (Cheiranthus Cheiri), with sweet-scented flowers varying in color from yellow to orange and deep red. In Europe it very common on old walls. Note: The name is sometimes extended to other species of Cheiranthus and of the related genus Erysimum, especially the American Western wallflower (Erysimum asperum), a biennial herb with orange-yellow flowers. 2. A lady at a ball, who, either from choice, or because not asked to dance, remains a spectator. [Colloq.]
Chimonanthus fragrans
Japan Ja*pan", a. Of or pertaining to Japan, or to the lacquered work of that country; as, Japan ware. Japan allspice (Bot.), a spiny shrub from Japan (Chimonanthus fragrans), related to the Carolina allspice. Japan black (Chem.), a quickly drying black lacquer or varnish, consisting essentially of asphaltum dissolved in naphtha or turpentine, and used for coating ironwork; -- called also Brunswick black, Japan lacquer, or simply Japan. Japan camphor, ordinary camphor brought from China or Japan, as distinguished from the rare variety called borneol or Borneo camphor. Japan clover, or Japan pea (Bot.), a cloverlike plant (Lespedeza striata) from Eastern Asia, useful for fodder, first noticed in the Southern United States about 1860, but now become very common. During the Civil War it was called variously Yankee clover and Rebel clover. Japan earth. See Catechu. Japan ink, a kind of writing ink, of a deep, glossy black when dry. Japan varnish, a varnish prepared from the milky juice of the Rhus vernix, a small Japanese tree related to the poison sumac.
Chionanthus virginica
Fringe tree Fringe tree A small oleaceous tree (Chionanthus virginica), of the southern United States, having clusters of white flowers with slender petals. It is often cultivated.
Chionanthus Virginica
Fringe Fringe, n. [OF, fringe, F. frange, prob. fr. L. fimbria fiber, thread, fringe, cf. fibra fiber, E. fiber, fimbriate.] 1. An ornamental appendage to the border of a piece of stuff, originally consisting of the ends of the warp, projecting beyond the woven fabric; but more commonly made separate and sewed on, consisting sometimes of projecting ends, twisted or plaited together, and sometimes of loose threads of wool, silk, or linen, or narrow strips of leather, or the like. 2. Something resembling in any respect a fringe; a line of objects along a border or edge; a border; an edging; a margin; a confine. The confines of grace and the fringes of repentance. --Jer. Taylor. 3. (Opt.) One of a number of light or dark bands, produced by the interference of light; a diffraction band; -- called also interference fringe. 4. (Bot.) The peristome or fringelike appendage of the capsules of most mosses. See Peristome. Fringe tree (Bot.), a small tree (Chionanthus Virginica), growing in the Southern United States, and having snow-white flowers, with long pendulous petals.
Chloranthus inconspicuus
Chulan Chu"lan, n. (Bot.) The fragrant flowers of the Chloranthus inconspicuus, used in China for perfuming tea.
Cordia Gerascanthus
Spanish Span"ish, a. Of or pertaining to Spain or the Spaniards. Spanish bayonet (Bot.), a liliaceous plant (Yucca alorifolia) with rigid spine-tipped leaves. The name is also applied to other similar plants of the Southwestern United States and mexico. Called also Spanish daggers. Spanish bean (Bot.) See the Note under Bean. Spanish black, a black pigment obtained by charring cork. --Ure. Spanish broom (Bot.), a leguminous shrub (Spartium junceum) having many green flexible rushlike twigs. Spanish brown, a species of earth used in painting, having a dark reddish brown color, due to the presence of sesquioxide of iron. Spanish buckeye (Bot.), a small tree (Ungnadia speciosa) of Texas, New Mexico, etc., related to the buckeye, but having pinnate leaves and a three-seeded fruit. Spanish burton (Naut.), a purchase composed of two single blocks. A double Spanish burton has one double and two single blocks. --Luce (Textbook of Seamanship). Spanish chalk (Min.), a kind of steatite; -- so called because obtained from Aragon in Spain. Spanish cress (Bot.), a cruciferous plant (lepidium Cadamines), a species of peppergrass. Spanish curiew (Zo["o]l.), the long-billed curlew. [U.S.] Spanish daggers (Bot.) See Spanish bayonet. Spanish elm (Bot.), a large West Indian tree (Cordia Gerascanthus) furnishing hard and useful timber. Spanish feretto, a rich reddish brown pigment obtained by calcining copper and sulphur together in closed crucibles. Spanish flag (Zo["o]l.), the California rockfish (Sebastichthys rubrivinctus). It is conspicuously colored with bands of red and white. Spanish fly (Zo["o]l.), a brilliant green beetle, common in the south of Europe, used for raising blisters. See Blister beetle under Blister, and Cantharis. Spanish fox (Naut.), a yarn twisted against its lay. Spanish grass. (Bot.) See Esparto. Spanish juice (Bot.), licorice. Spanish leather. See Cordwain. Spanish mackerel. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A species of mackerel (Scomber colias) found both in Europe and America. In America called chub mackerel, big-eyed mackerel, and bull mackerel. (b) In the United States, a handsome mackerel having bright yellow round spots (Scomberomorus maculatus), highly esteemed as a food fish. The name is sometimes erroneously applied to other species. See Illust. under Mackerel. Spanish main, the name formerly given to the southern portion of the Caribbean Sea, together with the contiguous coast, embracing the route traversed by Spanish treasure ships from the New to the Old World. Spanish moss. (Bot.) See Tillandsia. Spanish needles (Bot.), a composite weed (Bidens bipinnata) having achenia armed with needlelike awns. Spanish nut (Bot.), a bulbous plant (Iris Sisyrinchium) of the south of Europe. Spanish potato (Bot.), the sweet potato. See under Potato. Spanish red, an ocherous red pigment resembling Venetian red, but slightly yellower and warmer. --Fairholt. Spanish reef (Naut.), a knot tied in the head of a jib-headed sail. Spanish sheep (Zo["o]l.), a merino. Spanish white, an impalpable powder prepared from chalk by pulverizing and repeated washings, -- used as a white pigment. Spanish windlass (Naut.), a wooden roller, with a rope wound about it, into which a marline spike is thrust to serve as a lever.
Cynanthus cyanurus
Sylph Sylph, n. [F. sylphe, m., fr. Gr. ? a kind of grub, beetle, or moth; -- so called by Paracelsus.] 1. An imaginary being inhabiting the air; a fairy. 2. Fig.: A slender, graceful woman. 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of very brilliant South American humming birds, having a very long and deeply-forked tail; as, the blue-tailed sylph (Cynanthus cyanurus).
Dianthus
Dianthus Di*an"thus, n. [NL., fr. Gr. ?, gen. ?, Zeus + ? flower.] (Bot.) A genus of plants containing some of the most popular of cultivated flowers, including the pink, carnation, and Sweet William.
Dianthus barbatus
London tuft London tuft (Bot.) The Sweet William (Dianthus barbatus).
Dianthus barbatus
Sweet Sweet, a. [Compar. Sweeter; superl. Sweetest.] [OE. swete, swote, sote, AS. sw[=e]te; akin to OFries. sw[=e]te, OS. sw[=o]ti, D. zoet, G. s["u]ss, OHG. suozi, Icel. s[ae]tr, s[oe]tr, Sw. s["o]t, Dan. s["o]d, Goth. suts, L. suavis, for suadvis, Gr. ?, Skr. sv[=a]du sweet, svad, sv[=a]d, to sweeten. [root]175. Cf. Assuage, Suave, Suasion.] 1. Having an agreeable taste or flavor such as that of sugar; saccharine; -- opposed to sour and bitter; as, a sweet beverage; sweet fruits; sweet oranges. 2. Pleasing to the smell; fragrant; redolent; balmy; as, a sweet rose; sweet odor; sweet incense. The breath of these flowers is sweet to me. --Longfellow. 3. Pleasing to the ear; soft; melodious; harmonious; as, the sweet notes of a flute or an organ; sweet music; a sweet voice; a sweet singer. To make his English sweet upon his tongue. --Chaucer. A voice sweet, tremulous, but powerful. --Hawthorne. 4. Pleasing to the eye; beautiful; mild and attractive; fair; as, a sweet face; a sweet color or complexion. Sweet interchange Of hill and valley, rivers, woods, and plains. --Milton. 5. Fresh; not salt or brackish; as, sweet water. --Bacon. 6. Not changed from a sound or wholesome state. Specifically: (a) Not sour; as, sweet milk or bread. (b) Not state; not putrescent or putrid; not rancid; as, sweet butter; sweet meat or fish. 7. Plaesing to the mind; mild; gentle; calm; amiable; winning; presuasive; as, sweet manners. Canst thou bind the sweet influence of Pleiades? --Job xxxviii. 31. Mildness and sweet reasonableness is the one established rule of Christian working. --M. Arnold. Note: Sweet is often used in the formation of self-explaining compounds; as, sweet-blossomed, sweet-featured, sweet-smelling, sweet-tempered, sweet-toned, etc. Sweet alyssum. (Bot.) See Alyssum. Sweet apple. (Bot.) (a) Any apple of sweet flavor. (b) See Sweet-top. Sweet bay. (Bot.) (a) The laurel (laurus nobilis). (b) Swamp sassafras. Sweet calabash (Bot.), a plant of the genus Passiflora (P. maliformis) growing in the West Indies, and producing a roundish, edible fruit, the size of an apple. Sweet cicely. (Bot.) (a) Either of the North American plants of the umbelliferous genus Osmorrhiza having aromatic roots and seeds, and white flowers. --Gray. (b) A plant of the genus Myrrhis (M. odorata) growing in England. Sweet calamus, or Sweet cane. (Bot.) Same as Sweet flag, below. Sweet Cistus (Bot.), an evergreen shrub (Cistus Ladanum) from which the gum ladanum is obtained. Sweet clover. (Bot.) See Melilot. Sweet coltsfoot (Bot.), a kind of butterbur (Petasites sagittata) found in Western North America. Sweet corn (Bot.), a variety of the maize of a sweet taste. See the Note under Corn. Sweet fern (Bot.), a small North American shrub (Comptonia, or Myrica, asplenifolia) having sweet-scented or aromatic leaves resembling fern leaves. Sweet flag (Bot.), an endogenous plant (Acorus Calamus) having long flaglike leaves and a rootstock of a pungent aromatic taste. It is found in wet places in Europe and America. See Calamus, 2. Sweet gale (Bot.), a shrub (Myrica Gale) having bitter fragrant leaves; -- also called sweet willow, and Dutch myrtle. See 5th Gale. Sweet grass (Bot.), holy, or Seneca, grass. Sweet gum (Bot.), an American tree (Liquidambar styraciflua). See Liquidambar. Sweet herbs, fragrant herbs cultivated for culinary purposes. Sweet John (Bot.), a variety of the sweet William. Sweet leaf (Bot.), horse sugar. See under Horse. Sweet marjoram. (Bot.) See Marjoram. Sweet marten (Zo["o]l.), the pine marten. Sweet maudlin (Bot.), a composite plant (Achillea Ageratum) allied to milfoil. Sweet oil, olive oil. Sweet pea. (Bot.) See under Pea. Sweet potato. (Bot.) See under Potato. Sweet rush (Bot.), sweet flag. Sweet spirits of niter (Med. Chem.) See Spirit of nitrous ether, under Spirit. Sweet sultan (Bot.), an annual composite plant (Centaurea moschata), also, the yellow-flowered (C. odorata); -- called also sultan flower. Sweet tooth, an especial fondness for sweet things or for sweetmeats. [Colloq.] Sweet William. (a) (Bot.) A species of pink (Dianthus barbatus) of many varieties. (b) (Zo["o]l.) The willow warbler. (c) (Zo["o]l.) The European goldfinch; -- called also sweet Billy. [Prov. Eng.] Sweet willow (Bot.), sweet gale. Sweet wine. See Dry wine, under Dry. To be sweet on, to have a particular fondness for, or special interest in, as a young man for a young woman. [Colloq.] --Thackeray. Syn: Sugary; saccharine; dulcet; luscious.
G triacanthus
Locust tree Lo"cust tree` [Etymol. uncertain.] (Bot.) A large North American tree of the genus Robinia (R. Pseudacacia), producing large slender racemes of white, fragrant, papilionaceous flowers, and often cultivated as an ornamental tree. In England it is called acacia. Note: The name is also applied to other trees of different genera, especially to those of the genus Hymen[ae]a, of which H. Courbaril is a lofty, spreading tree of South America; also to the carob tree (Ceratonia siliqua), a tree growing in the Mediterranean region. Honey locust tree (Bot.), a tree of the genus Gleditschia ) G. triacanthus), having pinnate leaves and strong branching thorns; -- so called from a sweet pulp found between the seeds in the pods. Called also simply honey locust. Water locust tree (Bot.), a small swamp tree (Gleditschia monosperma), of the Southern United States.
Galanthus nivalis
Snowdrop Snow"drop`, n. (Bot.) A bulbous plant (Galanthus nivalis) bearing white flowers, which often appear while the snow is on the ground. It is cultivated in gardens for its beauty. Snowdrop tree. See Silver-bell tree, under Silver, a.
Gyracanthus
Gyracanthus Gyr`a*can"thus, n. [NL., fr. Gr, ? round + ? spine.] (Paleon.) A genus of fossil fishes, found in Devonian and carboniferous strata; -- so named from their round, sculptured spines.
Haemanthus
Bloodflower Blood"flow`er, n. [From the color of the flower.] (Bot.) A genus of bulbous plants, natives of Southern Africa, named H[ae]manthus, of the Amaryllis family. The juice of H. toxicarius is used by the Hottentots to poison their arrows.
Helianthus annuus
Sunflower Sun"flow`er, n. Any plant of the genus Helianthus; -- so called probably from the form and color of its flower, which is large disk with yellow rays. The commonly cultivated sunflower is Helianthus annuus, a native of America.
Helianthus tuberosus
Jerusalem Je*ru"sa*lem, n. [Gr. ?, fr. Heb. Y?r?sh[=a]laim.] The chief city of Palestine, intimately associated with the glory of the Jewish nation, and the life and death of Jesus Christ. Jerusalem artichoke [Perh. a corrupt. of It. girasole i.e., sunflower, or turnsole. See Gyre, Solar.] (Bot.) (a) An American plant, a perennial species of sunflower (Helianthus tuberosus), whose tubers are sometimes used as food. (b) One of the tubers themselves. Jerusalem cherry (Bot.), the popular name of either of either of two species of Solanum (S. Pseudo-capsicum and S. capsicastrum), cultivated as ornamental house plants. They bear bright red berries of about the size of cherries. Jerusalem oak (Bot.), an aromatic goosefoot (Chenopodium Botrys), common about houses and along roadsides. Jerusalem sage (Bot.), a perennial herb of the Mint family (Phlomis tuberosa). Jerusalem thorn (Bot.), a spiny, leguminous tree (Parkinsonia aculeata), widely dispersed in warm countries, and used for hedges. The New Jerusalem, Heaven; the Celestial City.

Meaning of Anthus from wikipedia

- pipit (Anthus novaeseelandiae) African pipit (Anthus cinnamomeus) Mountain pipit (Anthus hoeschi) Blyth's pipit (Anthus godlewskii) Tawny pipit (Anthus campestris)...
- In Gr**** mythology, the name Anthus (Ancient Gr****: Ἄνθος, Anthos "flower", "bloom" or "blossom") may refer to: Anthus, a son of Autonous and Hippodamia...
- Hippodamia and Autonous and sister to Anthus, Erodius, Schoeneus and Acanthus. When their father's horses attacked Anthus out of hunger and ate him, Zeus and...
- identified as Canis anthus Cuvier, 1820 was uncertain, the species should be known as Canis lupaster Hemprich and Ehrenberg, 1832 until Canis anthus can be validated...
- often distinguished as the subspecies Anthus pratensis whistleri, though it intergrades clinally with nominate Anthus pratensis pratensis found in the rest...
- Anthu Inthu Preethi Banthu is a 2008 Kannada film starring Aditya Babu and Ramya in lead roles. The film is a remake of the 2006 Telugu film Aadavari...
- The buff-bellied pipit (Anthus rubescens), or American pipit as it is known in North America, is a small songbird found on both sides of the northern Pacific...
- Genus Anthus: typical pipits Richard's pipit Anthus richardi Paddyfield pipit Anthus rufulus Australian pipit Anthus australis New Zealand pipit Anthus novaeseelandiae...
- (Pantholops hodgsonii), the shrub Magnolia hodgsonii, or the olive-backed pipit (Anthus hodgsoni). The meaning is "of the person named", so that Magnolia hodgsonii...
- dimidiato-albis). The current genus Anthus was created for the pipits by German naturalist Johann Matthäus Bechstein in 1805. Anthus is the Latin name for a small...
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