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Absolution day
Absolution Ab`so*lu"tion, n. [F. absolution, L. absolutio, fr. absolvere to absolve. See Absolve.] 1. An absolving, or setting free from guilt, sin, or penalty; forgiveness of an offense. ``Government . . . granting absolution to the nation.' --Froude. 2. (Civil Law) An acquittal, or sentence of a judge declaring and accused person innocent. [Obs.] 3. (R. C. Ch.) The exercise of priestly jurisdiction in the sacrament of penance, by which Catholics believe the sins of the truly penitent are forgiven. Note: In the English and other Protestant churches, this act regarded as simply declaratory, not as imparting forgiveness. 4. (Eccl.) An absolving from ecclesiastical penalties, -- for example, excommunication. --P. Cyc. 5. The form of words by which a penitent is absolved. --Shipley. 6. Delivery, in speech. [Obs.] --B. Jonson. Absolution day (R. C. Ch.), Tuesday before Easter.
After damp
After damp Aft"er damp` An irrespirable gas, remaining after an explosion of fire damp in mines; choke damp. See Carbonic acid.
after damp
Carbonic Car*bon"ic, a. [Cf. F. carbonique. See Carbon.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, carbon; as, carbonic oxide. Carbonic acid (Chem.), an acid H2CO3, not existing separately, which, combined with positive or basic atoms or radicals, forms carbonates. In common language the term is very generally applied to a compound of carbon and oxygen, CO2, more correctly called carbon dioxide. It is a colorless, heavy, irrespirable gas, extinguishing flame, and when breathed destroys life. It can be reduced to a liquid and solid form by intense pressure. It is produced in the fermentation of liquors, and by the combustion and decomposition of organic substances, or other substances containing carbon. It is formed in the explosion of fire damp in mines, and is hence called after damp; it is also know as choke damp, and mephitic air. Water will absorb its own volume of it, and more than this under pressure, and in this state becomes the common soda water of the shops, and the carbonated water of natural springs. Combined with lime it constitutes limestone, or common marble and chalk. Plants imbibe it for their nutrition and growth, the carbon being retained and the oxygen given out. Carbonic oxide (Chem.), a colorless gas, CO, of a light odor, called more correctly carbon monoxide. It is almost the only definitely known compound in which carbon seems to be divalent. It is a product of the incomplete combustion of carbon, and is an abundant constituent of water gas. It is fatal to animal life, extinguishes combustion, and burns with a pale blue flame, forming carbon dioxide.
Agathis Dammara
Amboyna pine Amboyna pine (Bot.) The resiniferous tree Agathis Dammara, of the Moluccas.
Agathis or Dammara australis
Kauri Ka"u*ri, n. [Native name.] (Bot.) A lofty coniferous tree of New Zealand Agathis, or Dammara, australis), furnishing valuable timber and yielding one kind of dammar resin. [Written also kaudi, cowdie, and cowrie.]
Agathis or Dammara orientalis
Dammar Dam"mar, Dammara Dam"ma*ra, n. [Jav. & Malay. damar.] An oleoresin used in making varnishes; dammar gum; dammara resin. It is obtained from certain resin trees indigenous to the East Indies, esp. Shorea robusta and the dammar pine. Dammar pine, (Bot.), a tree of the Moluccas (Agathis, or Dammara, orientalis), yielding dammar.
Anniversary day
Anniversary An`ni*ver"sa*ry, a. [L. anniversarius; annus year + vertere, versum, to turn: cf. F. anniversaire.] Returning with the year, at a stated time; annual; yearly; as, an anniversary feast. Anniversary day (R. C. Ch.). See Anniversary, n., 2. Anniversary week, that week in the year in which the annual meetings of religious and benevolent societies are held in Boston and New York. [Eastern U. S.]
Arbor Day
Arbor Ar"bor, n. [Written also arbour.] [L., a tree, a beam.] 1. (Bot.) A tree, as distinguished from a shrub. 2. [Cf. F. arbre.] (Mech.) (a) An axle or spindle of a wheel or opinion. (b) A mandrel in lathe turning. --Knight. Arbor Day, a day appointed for planting trees and shrubs. [U.S.]
Bear-trap dam
Bear-trap dam Bear"-trap` dam (Engin.) A kind of movable dam, in one form consisting of two leaves resting against each other at the top when raised and folding down one over the other when lowered, for deepening shallow parts in a river.
blue darter
Soldier Sol"dier, n. [OE. souldier, soudiour, souder, OF. soldier, soldoier, soldeier, sodoier, soudoier, soudier, fr. L. solidus a piece of money (hence applied to the pay of a soldier), fr. solidus solid. See Solid, and cf. Sold, n.] 1. One who is engaged in military service as an officer or a private; one who serves in an army; one of an organized body of combatants. I am a soldier and unapt to weep. --Shak. 2. Especially, a private in military service, as distinguished from an officer. It were meet that any one, before he came to be a captain, should have been a soldier. --Spenser. 3. A brave warrior; a man of military experience and skill, or a man of distinguished valor; -- used by way of emphasis or distinction. --Shak. 4. (Zo["o]l.) The red or cuckoo gurnard (Trigla pini.) [Prov. Eng.] 5. (Zo["o]l.) One of the asexual polymorphic forms of white ants, or termites, in which the head and jaws are very large and strong. The soldiers serve to defend the nest. See Termite. Soldier beetle (Zo["o]l.), an American carabid beetle (Chauliognathus Americanus) whose larva feeds upon other insects, such as the plum curculio. Soldier bug (Zo["o]l.), any hemipterous insect of the genus Podisus and allied genera, as the spined soldier bug (Podius spinosus). These bugs suck the blood of other insects. Soldier crab (Zo["o]l.) (a) The hermit crab. (b) The fiddler crab. Soldier fish (Zo["o]l.), a bright-colored etheostomoid fish (Etheostoma c[oe]ruleum) found in the Mississippi River; -- called also blue darter, and rainbow darter. Soldier fly (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of small dipterous flies of the genus Stratyomys and allied genera. They are often bright green, with a metallic luster, and are ornamented on the sides of the back with markings of yellow, like epaulets or shoulder straps. Soldier moth (Zo["o]l.), a large geometrid moth (Euschema militaris), having the wings bright yellow with bluish black lines and spots. Soldier orchis (Bot.), a kind of orchis (Orchis militaris).
Born days
Born again (Theol.), regenerated; renewed; having received spiritual life. ``Except a man be born again, he can not see the kingdom of God.' --John iii. 3. Born days, days since one was born; lifetime. [Colloq.]
Boxing day
Boxing day Box"ing day` The first week day after Christmas, a legal holiday on which Christmas boxes are given to postmen, errand boys, employees, etc. The night of this day is boxing night. [Eng.]
Buchloe dactyloides
Buffalo Buf"fa*lo, n.; pl. Buffaloes. [Sp. bufalo (cf. It. bufalo, F. buffle), fr. L. bubalus, bufalus, a kind of African stag or gazelle; also, the buffalo or wild ox, fr. Gr. ? buffalo, prob. fr. ? ox. See Cow the animal, and cf. Buff the color, and Bubale.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) A species of the genus Bos or Bubalus (B. bubalus), originally from India, but now found in most of the warmer countries of the eastern continent. It is larger and less docile than the common ox, and is fond of marshy places and rivers. 2. (Zo["o]l.) A very large and savage species of the same genus (B. Caffer) found in South Africa; -- called also Cape buffalo. 3. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of wild ox. 4. (Zo["o]l.) The bison of North America. 5. A buffalo robe. See Buffalo robe, below. 6. (Zo["o]l.) The buffalo fish. See Buffalo fish, below. Buffalo berry (Bot.), a shrub of the Upper Missouri (Sherherdia argentea) with acid edible red berries. Buffalo bird (Zo["o]l.), an African bird of the genus Buphaga, of two species. These birds perch upon buffaloes and cattle, in search of parasites. Buffalo bug, the carpet beetle. See under Carpet. Buffalo chips, dry dung of the buffalo, or bison, used for fuel. [U.S.] Buffalo clover (Bot.), a kind of clover (Trifolium reflexum and T.soloniferum) found in the ancient grazing grounds of the American bison. Buffalo cod (Zo["o]l.), a large, edible, marine fish (Ophiodon elongatus) of the northern Pacific coast; -- called also blue cod, and cultus cod. Buffalo fish (Zo["o]l.), one of several large fresh-water fishes of the family Catostomid[ae], of the Mississippi valley. The red-mouthed or brown (Ictiobus bubalus), the big-mouthed or black (Bubalichthys urus), and the small-mouthed (B. altus), are among the more important species used as food. Buffalo fly, or Buffalo gnat (Zo["o]l.), a small dipterous insect of the genus Simulium, allied to the black fly of the North. It is often extremely abundant in the lower part of the Mississippi valley and does great injury to domestic animals, often killing large numbers of cattle and horses. In Europe the Columbatz fly is a species with similar habits. Buffalo grass (Bot.), a species of short, sweet grass (Buchlo["e] dactyloides), from two to four inches high, covering the prairies on which the buffaloes, or bisons, feed. [U.S.] Buffalo nut (Bot.), the oily and drupelike fruit of an American shrub (Pyrularia oleifera); also, the shrub itself; oilnut. Buffalo robe, the skin of the bison of North America, prepared with the hair on; -- much used as a lap robe in sleighs.
Canicular days
Canicular Ca*nic"u*lar, a. [L. canicularis; cf. F. caniculaire.] Pertaining to, or measured, by the rising of the Dog Star. Canicular days, the dog days, See Dog days. Canicular year, the Egyptian year, computed from one heliacal rising of the Dog Star to another.
Cervus dama
Fallow deer Fal"low deer` [So called from its fallow or pale yellow color.] (Zo["o]l.) A European species of deer (Cervus dama), much smaller than the red deer. In summer both sexes are spotted with white. It is common in England, where it is often domesticated in the parks.
choke damp
Carbonic Car*bon"ic, a. [Cf. F. carbonique. See Carbon.] (Chem.) Of, pertaining to, or obtained from, carbon; as, carbonic oxide. Carbonic acid (Chem.), an acid H2CO3, not existing separately, which, combined with positive or basic atoms or radicals, forms carbonates. In common language the term is very generally applied to a compound of carbon and oxygen, CO2, more correctly called carbon dioxide. It is a colorless, heavy, irrespirable gas, extinguishing flame, and when breathed destroys life. It can be reduced to a liquid and solid form by intense pressure. It is produced in the fermentation of liquors, and by the combustion and decomposition of organic substances, or other substances containing carbon. It is formed in the explosion of fire damp in mines, and is hence called after damp; it is also know as choke damp, and mephitic air. Water will absorb its own volume of it, and more than this under pressure, and in this state becomes the common soda water of the shops, and the carbonated water of natural springs. Combined with lime it constitutes limestone, or common marble and chalk. Plants imbibe it for their nutrition and growth, the carbon being retained and the oxygen given out. Carbonic oxide (Chem.), a colorless gas, CO, of a light odor, called more correctly carbon monoxide. It is almost the only definitely known compound in which carbon seems to be divalent. It is a product of the incomplete combustion of carbon, and is an abundant constituent of water gas. It is fatal to animal life, extinguishes combustion, and burns with a pale blue flame, forming carbon dioxide.
Choke damp
Choke damp Choke" damp` See Carbonic acid, under Carbonic.
Christmas day
Christmas Christ"mas, n. [Christ + mass.] An annual church festival (December 25) and in some States a legal holiday, in memory of the birth of Christ, often celebrated by a particular church service, and also by special gifts, greetings, and hospitality. Christmas box. (a) A box in which presents are deposited at Christmas. (b) A present or small gratuity given to young people and servants at Christmas; a Christmas gift. Christmas carol, a carol sung at, or suitable for, Christmas. Christmas day. Same as Christmas. Christmas eve, the evening before Christmas. Christmas fern (Bot.), an evergreen North American fern (Aspidium acrostichoides), which is much used for decoration in winter. Christmas flower, Christmas rose, the black hellebore, a poisonous plant of the buttercup family, which in Southern Europe often produces beautiful roselike flowers midwinter. Christmas tree, a small evergreen tree, set up indoors, to be decorated with bonbons, presents, etc., and illuminated on Christmas eve.
Class day
Class day Class day In American colleges and universities, a day of the commencement season on which the senior class celebrates the completion of its course by exercises conducted by the members, such as the reading of the class histories and poem, the delivery of the class oration, the planting of the class ivy, etc.
Clear days
Clear Clear (kl[=e]r), a. [Compar. Clearer (-[~e]r); superl. Clearest.] [OE. cler, cleer, OF. cler, F. clair, fr.L. clarus, clear, broght, loud, distinct, renownwd; perh. akin to L. clamare to call, E. claim. Cf. Chanticleer, Clairvoyant, Claret, Clarufy.] 1. Free from opaqueness; transparent; bright; light; luminous; unclouded. The stream is so transparent, pure, and clear. --Denham. Fair as the moon, clear as the sun. --Canticles vi. 10. 2. Free from ambiguity or indistinctness; lucid; perspicuous; plain; evident; manifest; indubitable. One truth is clear; whatever is, is right. --Pope. 3. Able to perceive clearly; keen; acute; penetrating; discriminating; as, a clear intellect; a clear head. Mother of science! now I feel thy power Within me clear, not only to discern Things in their causes, but to trace the ways Of highest agents. --Milton. 4. Not clouded with passion; serene; cheerful. With a countenance as clear As friendship wears at feasts. --Shak. 5. Easily or distinctly heard; audible; canorous. Hark! the numbers soft and clear Gently steal upon the ear. --Pope. 6. Without mixture; entirely pure; as, clear sand. 7. Without defect or blemish, such as freckles or knots; as, a clear complexion; clear lumber. 8. Free from guilt or stain; unblemished. Statesman, yet friend to truth! in soul sincere, In action faithful, and in honor clear. --Pope. 9. Without diminution; in full; net; as, clear profit. I often wished that I had clear, For life, six hundred pounds a-year. --Swift . 10. Free from impediment or obstruction; unobstructed; as, a clear view; to keep clear of debt. My companion . . . left the way clear for him. --Addison. 11. Free from embarrassment; detention, etc. The cruel corporal whispered in my ear, Five pounds, if rightly tipped, would set me clear. --Gay. Clear breach. See under Breach, n., 4. Clear days (Law.), days reckoned from one day to another, excluding both the first and last day; as, from Sunday to Sunday there are six clear days. Clear stuff, boards, planks, etc., free from knots. Syn: Manifest; pure; unmixed; pellucid; transparent; luminous; obvious; visible; plain; evident; apparent; distinct; perspicuous. See Manifest.
Clog dance
Clog Clog, n. [OE. clogge clog, Scot. clag, n., a clot, v., to to obstruct, cover with mud or anything adhesive; prob. of the same origin as E. clay.] 1. That which hinders or impedes motion; hence, an encumbrance, restraint, or impediment, of any kind. All the ancient, honest, juridical principles and institutions of England are so many clogs to check and retard the headlong course of violence and opression. --Burke. 2. A weight, as a log or block of wood, attached to a man or an animal to hinder motion. As a dog . . . but chance breaks loose, And quits his clog. --Hudibras. A clog of lead was round my feet. --Tennyson. 3. A shoe, or sandal, intended to protect the feet from wet, or to increase the apparent stature, and having, therefore, a very thick sole. Cf. Chopine. In France the peasantry goes barefoot; and the middle sort . . . makes use of wooden clogs. --Harvey. Clog almanac, a primitive kind of almanac or calendar, formerly used in England, made by cutting notches and figures on the four edges of a clog, or square piece of wood, brass, or bone; -- called also a Runic staff, from the Runic characters used in the numerical notation. Clog dance, a dance performed by a person wearing clogs, or thick-soled shoes. Clog dancer.
Clog dancer
Clog Clog, n. [OE. clogge clog, Scot. clag, n., a clot, v., to to obstruct, cover with mud or anything adhesive; prob. of the same origin as E. clay.] 1. That which hinders or impedes motion; hence, an encumbrance, restraint, or impediment, of any kind. All the ancient, honest, juridical principles and institutions of England are so many clogs to check and retard the headlong course of violence and opression. --Burke. 2. A weight, as a log or block of wood, attached to a man or an animal to hinder motion. As a dog . . . but chance breaks loose, And quits his clog. --Hudibras. A clog of lead was round my feet. --Tennyson. 3. A shoe, or sandal, intended to protect the feet from wet, or to increase the apparent stature, and having, therefore, a very thick sole. Cf. Chopine. In France the peasantry goes barefoot; and the middle sort . . . makes use of wooden clogs. --Harvey. Clog almanac, a primitive kind of almanac or calendar, formerly used in England, made by cutting notches and figures on the four edges of a clog, or square piece of wood, brass, or bone; -- called also a Runic staff, from the Runic characters used in the numerical notation. Clog dance, a dance performed by a person wearing clogs, or thick-soled shoes. Clog dancer.
Columbus Day
Columbus Day Co*lum"bus Day The 12th day of October, on which day in 1492 Christopher Columbus discovered America, landing on one of the Bahama Islands (probably the one now commonly called Watling Island), and naming it ``San Salvador'; -- called also Discovery Day. This day is made a legal holiday in many States of The United States.
Commemoration day
Commemoration Com*mem`o*ra"tion, n. [L. commemoratio.] 1. The act of commemorating; an observance or celebration designed to honor the memory of some person or event. This sacrament was designed to be a standing commemoration of the death and passion of our Lord. --Abp. Tillotson. The commonwealth which . . . chooses the most flagrant act of murderous regicide treason for a feast of eternal commemoration. --Burke. 2. Whatever serves the purpose of commemorating; a memorial. Commemoration day, at the University of Oxford, Eng., an annual observance or ceremony in honor of the benefactors of the University, at which time honorary degrees are conferred.
Consequential damage
Consequential Con`se*quen"tial, a. 1. Following as a consequence, result, or logical inference; consequent. All that is revealed in Scripture has a consequential necessity of being believed . . . because it is of divine authority. --Locke. These kind of arguments . . . are highly consequential and concludent to my purpose. --Sir M. Hale. 2. Assuming or exhibiting an air of consequence; pretending to importance; pompous; self-important; as, a consequential man. See Consequence, n., 4. His stately and consequential pace. --Sir W. Scott. Consequential damage (Law) (a) Damage so remote as not to be actionable (b) Damage which although remote is actionable. (c) Actionable damage, but not following as an immediate result of an act.
Consequential damage
Damage Dam"age, n. [OF. damage, domage, F. dommage, fr. assumed LL. damnaticum, from L. damnum damage. See Damn.] 1. Injury or harm to person, property, or reputation; an inflicted loss of value; detriment; hurt; mischief. He that sendeth a message by the hand of a fool cutteth off the feet and drinketh damage. --Prov. xxvi. 6. Great errors and absurdities many commit for want of a friend to tell them of them, to the great damage both of their fame and fortune. --Bacon. 2. pl. (Law) The estimated reparation in money for detriment or injury sustained; a compensation, recompense, or satisfaction to one party, for a wrong or injury actually done to him by another. Note: In common-law action, the jury are the proper judges of damages. Consequential damage. See under Consequential. Exemplary damages (Law), damages imposed by way of example to others. Nominal damages (Law), those given for a violation of a right where no actual loss has accrued. Vindictive damages, those given specially for the punishment of the wrongdoer. Syn: Mischief; injury; harm; hurt; detriment; evil; ill. See Mischief.
cushion dance
Cushion Cush"ion (k??sh"?n), n. [OE. cuischun, quisshen, OF. coissin, cuissin, F. coussin, fr. (assumed) LL. culcitinum, dim. of L. culcita cushion, mattress, pillow. See Quilt, and cf. Counterpoint a coverlet.] 1. A case or bag stuffed with some soft and elastic material, and used to sit or recline upon; a soft pillow or pad. Two cushions stuffed with straw, the seat to raise. --Dryden. 2. Anything resembling a cushion in properties or use; as: (a) a pad on which gilders cut gold leaf; (b) a mass of steam in the end of the cylinder of a steam engine to receive the impact of the piston; (c) the elastic edge of a billiard table. 3. A riotous kind of dance, formerly common at weddings; -- called also cushion dance. --Halliwell. Cushion capital.(Arch.) A capital so sculptured as to appear like a cushion pressed down by the weight of its entablature. (b) A name given to a form of capital, much used in the Romanesque style, modeled like a bowl, the upper part of which is cut away on four sides, leaving vertical faces. Cushion star (Zo["o]l.) a pentagonal starfish belonging to Goniaster, Astrogonium, and other allied genera; -- so called from its form.
Cynodon Dactylon
Scutch grass Scutch" grass` (Bot.) A kind of pasture grass (Cynodon Dactylon). See Bermuda grass: also Illustration in Appendix.
Cynodon dactylon
Doob grass Doob" grass` [Hind. d?b.] (Bot.) A perennial, creeping grass (Cynodon dactylon), highly prized, in Hindostan, as food for cattle, and acclimated in the United States. [Written also doub grass.]
Cynodon Dactylon
Bermuda grass Ber*mu"da grass` (Bot.) A kind of grass (Cynodon Dactylon) esteemed for pasture in the Southern United States. It is a native of Southern Europe, but is now wide-spread in warm countries; -- called also scutch grass, and in Bermuda, devil grass.

Meaning of da from wikipedia

- "Da Da Da I Don't Love You You Don't Love Me Aha Aha Aha" (usually shortened to "Da Da Da") is a song by the German band Trio (sometimes stylised as TRIO)...
- Da, DA, dA, and other variants may refer to: DA! (band), a Chicago post-punk band of the 1980s Da (play), a 1978 play by Hugh Leonard Da (film), a...
- di ser Piero da Vinci (Italian: [leoˈnardo di ˌsɛr ˈpjɛːro da (v)ˈvintʃi] (listen); 15 April 1452 – 2 May 1519), more commonly Leonardo da Vinci or simply...
- DaDa is the fifteenth studio album by Alice Cooper. It was originally released in September 28, 1983, on the label Warner Bros.. DaDa would be Cooper's...
- "Da Da Da" is a 1982 song by the German band Trio. Da Da Da may also refer to: Da Da Da (album), by Maki Ohguro (1983) "Da Da Da" (Lil Wayne Single) (2009)...
- Da Good Da Bad & Da Ugly is the sixth studio album by the Houston hip hop group the Geto Boys, released in late 1998 on Rap-A-Lot/Virgin Records. Following...
- Maria da Graça Meneghel (Portuguese: [maˈɾia da ˈgɾasa ˈʃuʃa mẽneˈgɛw]; born 27 March 1963), commonly known as Xuxa (English: /ˈʃuːʃə/ SHOO-shə; Portuguese: [ˈʃuʃɐ])...
- Da'at or Daas ("Knowledge", Hebrew: דעת [ˈdaʕaθ]) is a word in the Hebrew language. In the branch of Jewish mysticism known as Kabbalah, Da'at is the...
- Uff da! (sometimes also spelled huffda, uff-da, uffda, uff-dah, oofda, ufda, ufdah, oofta, or uf daa) is an exclamation or interjection expressing bafflement...
- as cà phê đá or cafe da (Vietnamese: cà phê đá, literally "ice coffee") is a traditional Vietnamese coffee recipe. At its simplest, cà phê đá is made using...
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