Definition of Wool. Meaning of Wool. Synonyms of Wool

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Definition of Wool

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Abb wool
Abb wool Abb" wool ([a^]b" w[oo^]l). See Abb.
Berlin wool
Berlin Ber"lin, n. [The capital of Prussia] 1. A four-wheeled carriage, having a sheltered seat behind the body and separate from it, invented in the 17th century, at Berlin. 2. Fine worsted for fancy-work; zephyr worsted; -- called also Berlin wool. Berlin black, a black varnish, drying with almost a dead surface; -- used for coating the better kinds of ironware. --Ure. Berlin blue, Prussian blue. --Ure. Berlin green, a complex cyanide of iron, used as a green dye, and similar to Prussian blue. Berlin iron, a very fusible variety of cast iron, from which figures and other delicate articles are manufactured. These are often stained or lacquered in imitation of bronze. Berlin shop, a shop for the sale of worsted embroidery and the materials for such work. Berlin work, worsted embroidery.
Linsey-woolsey
Linsey-woolsey Lin"sey-wool"sey (-w[oo^]l"s[y^]; 277), n. 1. Cloth made of linen and wool, mixed. 2. Jargon. [Obs.] --Shak.
Linsey-woolsey
Linsey-woolsey Lin"sey-wool"sey, a. Made of linen and wool; hence, of different and unsuitable parts; mean. --Johnson.
Mineral wool
Mineral Min"er*al, a. 1. Of or pertaining to minerals; consisting of a mineral or of minerals; as, a mineral substance. 2. Impregnated with minerals; as, mineral waters. Mineral acids (Chem.), inorganic acids, as sulphuric, nitric, phosphoric, hydrochloric, acids, etc., as distinguished from the organic acids. Mineral blue, the name usually given to azurite, when reduced to an impalpable powder for coloring purposes. Mineral candle, a candle made of paraffine. Mineral caoutchouc, an elastic mineral pitch, a variety of bitumen, resembling caoutchouc in elasticity and softness. See Caoutchouc, and Elaterite. Mineral chameleon (Chem.) See Chameleon mineral, under Chameleon. Mineral charcoal. See under Charcoal. Mineral cotton. See Mineral wool (below). Mineral green, a green carbonate of copper; malachite. Mineral kingdom (Nat. Sci.), that one of the three grand divisions of nature which embraces all inorganic objects, as distinguished from plants or animals. Mineral oil. See Naphtha, and Petroleum. Mineral paint, a pigment made chiefly of some natural mineral substance, as red or yellow iron ocher. Mineral patch. See Bitumen, and Asphalt. Mineral right, the right of taking minerals from land. Mineral salt (Chem.), a salt of a mineral acid. Mineral tallow, a familiar name for hatchettite, from its fatty or spermaceti-like appearance. Mineral water. See under Water. Mineral wax. See Ozocerite. Mineral wool, a fibrous wool-like material, made by blowing a powerful jet of air or steam through melted slag. It is a poor conductor of heat.
Pine wool
Pine Pine, n. [AS. p[=i]n, L. pinus.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus Pinus. See Pinus. Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United States, of which the white pine (P. Strobus), the Georgia pine (P. australis), the red pine (P. resinosa), and the great West Coast sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) are among the most valuable. The Scotch pine or fir, also called Norway or Riga pine (Pinus sylvestris), is the only British species. The nut pine is any pine tree, or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See Pinon. The spruces, firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other genera. 2. The wood of the pine tree. 3. A pineapple. Ground pine. (Bot.) See under Ground. Norfolk Island pine (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree, the Araucaria excelsa. Pine barren, a tract of infertile land which is covered with pines. [Southern U.S.] Pine borer (Zo["o]l.), any beetle whose larv[ae] bore into pine trees. Pine finch. (Zo["o]l.) See Pinefinch, in the Vocabulary. Pine grosbeak (Zo["o]l.), a large grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), which inhabits the northern parts of both hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with red. Pine lizard (Zo["o]l.), a small, very active, mottled gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus), native of the Middle States; -- called also swift, brown scorpion, and alligator. Pine marten. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European weasel (Mustela martes), called also sweet marten, and yellow-breasted marten. (b) The American sable. See Sable. Pine moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small tortricid moths of the genus Retinia, whose larv[ae] burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often doing great damage. Pine mouse (Zo["o]l.), an American wild mouse (Arvicola pinetorum), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine forests. Pine needle (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves of a pine tree. See Pinus. Pine-needle wool. See Pine wool (below). Pine oil, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors. Pine snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless North American snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). It is whitish, covered with brown blotches having black margins. Called also bull snake. The Western pine snake (P. Sayi) is chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange. Pine tree (Bot.), a tree of the genus Pinus; pine. Pine-tree money, money coined in Massachusetts in the seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a figure of a pine tree. Pine weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of weevils whose larv[ae] bore in the wood of pine trees. Several species are known in both Europe and America, belonging to the genera Pissodes, Hylobius, etc. Pine wool, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic arts; -- called also pine-needle wool, and pine-wood wool.
Pine-needle wool
Pine Pine, n. [AS. p[=i]n, L. pinus.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus Pinus. See Pinus. Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United States, of which the white pine (P. Strobus), the Georgia pine (P. australis), the red pine (P. resinosa), and the great West Coast sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) are among the most valuable. The Scotch pine or fir, also called Norway or Riga pine (Pinus sylvestris), is the only British species. The nut pine is any pine tree, or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See Pinon. The spruces, firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other genera. 2. The wood of the pine tree. 3. A pineapple. Ground pine. (Bot.) See under Ground. Norfolk Island pine (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree, the Araucaria excelsa. Pine barren, a tract of infertile land which is covered with pines. [Southern U.S.] Pine borer (Zo["o]l.), any beetle whose larv[ae] bore into pine trees. Pine finch. (Zo["o]l.) See Pinefinch, in the Vocabulary. Pine grosbeak (Zo["o]l.), a large grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), which inhabits the northern parts of both hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with red. Pine lizard (Zo["o]l.), a small, very active, mottled gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus), native of the Middle States; -- called also swift, brown scorpion, and alligator. Pine marten. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European weasel (Mustela martes), called also sweet marten, and yellow-breasted marten. (b) The American sable. See Sable. Pine moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small tortricid moths of the genus Retinia, whose larv[ae] burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often doing great damage. Pine mouse (Zo["o]l.), an American wild mouse (Arvicola pinetorum), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine forests. Pine needle (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves of a pine tree. See Pinus. Pine-needle wool. See Pine wool (below). Pine oil, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors. Pine snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless North American snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). It is whitish, covered with brown blotches having black margins. Called also bull snake. The Western pine snake (P. Sayi) is chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange. Pine tree (Bot.), a tree of the genus Pinus; pine. Pine-tree money, money coined in Massachusetts in the seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a figure of a pine tree. Pine weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of weevils whose larv[ae] bore in the wood of pine trees. Several species are known in both Europe and America, belonging to the genera Pissodes, Hylobius, etc. Pine wool, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic arts; -- called also pine-needle wool, and pine-wood wool.
pine-needle wool
Pine Pine, n. [AS. p[=i]n, L. pinus.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus Pinus. See Pinus. Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United States, of which the white pine (P. Strobus), the Georgia pine (P. australis), the red pine (P. resinosa), and the great West Coast sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) are among the most valuable. The Scotch pine or fir, also called Norway or Riga pine (Pinus sylvestris), is the only British species. The nut pine is any pine tree, or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See Pinon. The spruces, firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other genera. 2. The wood of the pine tree. 3. A pineapple. Ground pine. (Bot.) See under Ground. Norfolk Island pine (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree, the Araucaria excelsa. Pine barren, a tract of infertile land which is covered with pines. [Southern U.S.] Pine borer (Zo["o]l.), any beetle whose larv[ae] bore into pine trees. Pine finch. (Zo["o]l.) See Pinefinch, in the Vocabulary. Pine grosbeak (Zo["o]l.), a large grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), which inhabits the northern parts of both hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with red. Pine lizard (Zo["o]l.), a small, very active, mottled gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus), native of the Middle States; -- called also swift, brown scorpion, and alligator. Pine marten. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European weasel (Mustela martes), called also sweet marten, and yellow-breasted marten. (b) The American sable. See Sable. Pine moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small tortricid moths of the genus Retinia, whose larv[ae] burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often doing great damage. Pine mouse (Zo["o]l.), an American wild mouse (Arvicola pinetorum), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine forests. Pine needle (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves of a pine tree. See Pinus. Pine-needle wool. See Pine wool (below). Pine oil, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors. Pine snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless North American snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). It is whitish, covered with brown blotches having black margins. Called also bull snake. The Western pine snake (P. Sayi) is chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange. Pine tree (Bot.), a tree of the genus Pinus; pine. Pine-tree money, money coined in Massachusetts in the seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a figure of a pine tree. Pine weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of weevils whose larv[ae] bore in the wood of pine trees. Several species are known in both Europe and America, belonging to the genera Pissodes, Hylobius, etc. Pine wool, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic arts; -- called also pine-needle wool, and pine-wood wool.
pine-wood wool
Pine Pine, n. [AS. p[=i]n, L. pinus.] 1. (Bot.) Any tree of the coniferous genus Pinus. See Pinus. Note: There are about twenty-eight species in the United States, of which the white pine (P. Strobus), the Georgia pine (P. australis), the red pine (P. resinosa), and the great West Coast sugar pine (P. Lambertiana) are among the most valuable. The Scotch pine or fir, also called Norway or Riga pine (Pinus sylvestris), is the only British species. The nut pine is any pine tree, or species of pine, which bears large edible seeds. See Pinon. The spruces, firs, larches, and true cedars, though formerly considered pines, are now commonly assigned to other genera. 2. The wood of the pine tree. 3. A pineapple. Ground pine. (Bot.) See under Ground. Norfolk Island pine (Bot.), a beautiful coniferous tree, the Araucaria excelsa. Pine barren, a tract of infertile land which is covered with pines. [Southern U.S.] Pine borer (Zo["o]l.), any beetle whose larv[ae] bore into pine trees. Pine finch. (Zo["o]l.) See Pinefinch, in the Vocabulary. Pine grosbeak (Zo["o]l.), a large grosbeak (Pinicola enucleator), which inhabits the northern parts of both hemispheres. The adult male is more or less tinged with red. Pine lizard (Zo["o]l.), a small, very active, mottled gray lizard (Sceloporus undulatus), native of the Middle States; -- called also swift, brown scorpion, and alligator. Pine marten. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European weasel (Mustela martes), called also sweet marten, and yellow-breasted marten. (b) The American sable. See Sable. Pine moth (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small tortricid moths of the genus Retinia, whose larv[ae] burrow in the ends of the branchlets of pine trees, often doing great damage. Pine mouse (Zo["o]l.), an American wild mouse (Arvicola pinetorum), native of the Middle States. It lives in pine forests. Pine needle (Bot.), one of the slender needle-shaped leaves of a pine tree. See Pinus. Pine-needle wool. See Pine wool (below). Pine oil, an oil resembling turpentine, obtained from fir and pine trees, and used in making varnishes and colors. Pine snake (Zo["o]l.), a large harmless North American snake (Pituophis melanoleucus). It is whitish, covered with brown blotches having black margins. Called also bull snake. The Western pine snake (P. Sayi) is chestnut-brown, mottled with black and orange. Pine tree (Bot.), a tree of the genus Pinus; pine. Pine-tree money, money coined in Massachusetts in the seventeenth century, and so called from its bearing a figure of a pine tree. Pine weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of weevils whose larv[ae] bore in the wood of pine trees. Several species are known in both Europe and America, belonging to the genera Pissodes, Hylobius, etc. Pine wool, a fiber obtained from pine needles by steaming them. It is prepared on a large scale in some of the Southern United States, and has many uses in the economic arts; -- called also pine-needle wool, and pine-wood wool.
Seed wool
Seed Seed, n.; pl. Seed or Seeds. [OE. seed, sed, AS. s?d, fr. s[=a]wan to sow; akin to D. zaad seed, G. saat, Icel. s[=a]?, s??i, Goth. manas?ps seed of men. world. See Sow to scatter seed, and cf. Colza.] 1. (Bot.) (a) A ripened ovule, consisting of an embryo with one or more integuments, or coverings; as, an apple seed; a currant seed. By germination it produces a new plant. (b) Any small seedlike fruit, though it may consist of a pericarp, or even a calyx, as well as the seed proper; as, parsnip seed; thistle seed. And God said, Let the earth bring forth grass, the herb yielding seed, and the fruit tree yielding fruit after his kind, whose seed is in itself. --Gen. i. 11. Note: The seed proper has an outer and an inner coat, and within these the kernel or nucleus. The kernel is either the embryo alone, or the embryo inclosed in the albumen, which is the material for the nourishment of the developing embryo. The scar on a seed, left where the stem parted from it, is called the hilum, and the closed orifice of the ovule, the micropyle. 2. (Physiol.) The generative fluid of the male; semen; sperm; -- not used in the plural. 3. That from which anything springs; first principle; original; source; as, the seeds of virtue or vice. 4. The principle of production. Praise of great acts he scatters as a seed, Which may the like in coming ages breed. --Waller. 5. Progeny; offspring; children; descendants; as, the seed of Abraham; the seed of David. Note: In this sense the word is applied to one person, or to any number collectively, and admits of the plural form, though rarely used in the plural. 6. Race; generation; birth. Of mortal seed they were not held. --Waller. Seed bag (Artesian well), a packing to prevent percolation of water down the bore hole. It consists of a bag encircling the tubing and filled with flax seed, which swells when wet and fills the space between the tubing and the sides of the hole. Seed bud (Bot.), the germ or rudiment of the plant in the embryo state; the ovule. Seed coat (Bot.), the covering of a seed. Seed corn, or Seed grain (Bot.), corn or grain for seed. Seed down (Bot.), the soft hairs on certain seeds, as cotton seed. Seed drill. See 6th Drill, 2 (a) . Seed eater (Zo["o]l.), any finch of the genera Sporophila, and Crithagra. They feed mainly on seeds. Seed gall (Zo["o]l.), any gall which resembles a seed, formed, on the leaves of various plants, usually by some species of Phylloxera. Seed leaf (Bot.), a cotyledon. Seed lobe (Bot.), a cotyledon; a seed leaf. Seed oil, oil expressed from the seeds of plants. Seed oyster, a young oyster, especially when of a size suitable for transplantation to a new locality. Seed pearl, a small pearl of little value. Seed plat, or Seed plot, the ground on which seeds are sown, to produce plants for transplanting; a nursery. Seed stalk (Bot.), the stalk of an ovule or seed; a funicle. Seed tick (Zo["o]l.), one of several species of ticks resembling seeds in form and color. Seed vessel (Bot.), that part of a plant which contains the seeds; a pericarp. Seed weevil (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous small weevels, especially those of the genus Apion, which live in the seeds of various plants. Seed wool, cotton wool not yet cleansed of its seeds. [Southern U.S.]
Skin wool
Skin Skin, n. [Icel. skinn; akin to Sw. skinn, Dan. skind, AS. scinn, G. schined to skin.] 1. (Anat.) The external membranous integument of an animal. Note: In man, and the vertebrates generally, the skin consist of two layers, an outer nonsensitive and nonvascular epidermis, cuticle, or skarfskin, composed of cells which are constantly growing and multiplying in the deeper, and being thrown off in the superficial, layers; and an inner sensitive, and vascular dermis, cutis, corium, or true skin, composed mostly of connective tissue. 2. The hide of an animal, separated from the body, whether green, dry, or tanned; especially, that of a small animal, as a calf, sheep, or goat. 3. A vessel made of skin, used for holding liquids. See Bottle, 1. ``Skins of wine.' --Tennyson. 4. The bark or husk of a plant or fruit; the exterior coat of fruits and plants. 5. (Naut.) (a) That part of a sail, when furled, which remains on the outside and covers the whole. --Totten. (b) The covering, as of planking or iron plates, outside the framing, forming the sides and bottom of a vessel; the shell; also, a lining inside the framing. Skin friction, Skin resistance (Naut.), the friction, or resistance, caused by the tendency of water to adhere to the immersed surface (skin) of a vessel. Skin graft (Surg.), a small portion of skin used in the process of grafting. See Graft, v. t., 2. Skin moth (Zo["o]l.), any insect which destroys the prepared skins of animals, especially the larva of Dermestes and Anthrenus. Skin of the teeth, nothing, or next to nothing; the least possible hold or advantage. --Job xix. 20. Skin wool, wool taken from dead sheep.
Slag wool
Slag Slag, n. [Sw. slagg, or LG. slacke, whence G. schlacke; originally, perhaps, the splinters struck off from the metal by hammering. See Slay, v. t.] 1. The dross, or recrement, of a metal; also, vitrified cinders. 2. The scoria of a volcano. Slag furnace, or Slag hearth (Metal.), a furnace, or hearth, for extracting lead from slags or poor ore. Slag wool, mineral wool. See under Mineral.
Woold
Woold Woold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Woolded; p. pr. & vb. n. Woolding.] [D. woelen, bewoelen; akin to G. wuhlen, bewuhlen. [root]146.] (Naut.) To wind, or wrap; especially, to wind a rope round, as a mast or yard made of two or more pieces, at the place where it has been fished or scarfed, in order to strengthen it.
Woolded
Woold Woold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Woolded; p. pr. & vb. n. Woolding.] [D. woelen, bewoelen; akin to G. wuhlen, bewuhlen. [root]146.] (Naut.) To wind, or wrap; especially, to wind a rope round, as a mast or yard made of two or more pieces, at the place where it has been fished or scarfed, in order to strengthen it.
Woolder
Woolder Woold"er, n. 1. (Naut.) A stick used to tighten the rope in woolding. 2. (Rope Making) One of the handles of the top, formed by a wooden pin passing through it. See 1st Top, 2.
Woolding
Woold Woold, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Woolded; p. pr. & vb. n. Woolding.] [D. woelen, bewoelen; akin to G. wuhlen, bewuhlen. [root]146.] (Naut.) To wind, or wrap; especially, to wind a rope round, as a mast or yard made of two or more pieces, at the place where it has been fished or scarfed, in order to strengthen it.
Woolding
Woolding Woold"ing, n. (Naut.) (a) The act of winding or wrapping anything with a rope, as a mast. (b) A rope used for binding masts and spars.
Wool-dyed
Wool-dyed Wool"-dyed`, a. Dyed before being made into cloth, in distinction from piece-dyed; ingrain.
Wooled
Wooled Wooled, a. Having (such) wool; as, a fine-wooled sheep.
Woolen
Woolen Wool"en, a. [OE. wollen; cf. AS. wyllen. See Wool.] [Written also woollen.] 1. Made of wool; consisting of wool; as, woolen goods. 2. Of or pertaining to wool or woolen cloths; as, woolen manufactures; a woolen mill; a woolen draper. Woolen scribbler, a machine for combing or preparing wool in thin, downy, translucent layers.
Woolen
Woolen Wool"en, n. [Written also woollen.] Cloth made of wool; woollen goods.
Woolen scribbler
Woolen Wool"en, a. [OE. wollen; cf. AS. wyllen. See Wool.] [Written also woollen.] 1. Made of wool; consisting of wool; as, woolen goods. 2. Of or pertaining to wool or woolen cloths; as, woolen manufactures; a woolen mill; a woolen draper. Woolen scribbler, a machine for combing or preparing wool in thin, downy, translucent layers.
Woolenet
Woolenet Wool`en*et", n. A thin, light fabric of wool. [Written also woollenet, woolenette, and woollenette.]
woolenette
Woolenet Wool`en*et", n. A thin, light fabric of wool. [Written also woollenet, woolenette, and woollenette.]
Woolert
Woolert Woo"lert, n. (Zo["o]l.) The barn owl. [Prov. Eng.] [Written also oolert, and owlerd.]
woolfel
Woolfell Wool"fell`, n. [Wool + fell a skin.] A skin with the wool; a skin from which the wool has not been sheared or pulled. [Written also woolfel.]
Woolfell
Woolfell Wool"fell`, n. [Wool + fell a skin.] A skin with the wool; a skin from which the wool has not been sheared or pulled. [Written also woolfel.]
Woolgathering
Woolgathering Wool"gath`er*ing, n. Indulgence in idle imagination; a foolish or useless pursuit or design. His wits were a woolgathering, as they say. --Burton.
Woolgathering
Woolgathering Wool"gath`er*ing, a. Indulging in a vagrant or idle exercise of the imagination; roaming upon a fruitless quest; idly fanciful.
Woolgrower
Woolgrower Wool"grow`er, n. One who raises sheep for the production of wool. -- Wool"grow`ing, n.

Meaning of Wool from wikipedia

- Wool is the textile fiber obtained from sheep and other animals, including cashmere and mohair from goats, qiviut from muskoxen, hide and fur clothing...
- the short story "Wool", which was later published together with four sequel novellas as a novel with the same name. Along with Wool, the series consists...
- Cashmere wool, usually simply known as cashmere, is a fiber obtained from cashmere goats, pashmina goats, and some other breeds of goat. It has been used...
- wool is any fibrous material formed by spinning or drawing molten mineral or rock materials such as slag and ceramics. Applications of mineral wool include...
- Gl**** wool is an insulating material made from fibres of gl**** arranged using a binder into a texture similar to wool. The process traps many small pockets...
- Wood wool, known primarily as excelsior in North America, is a product made of wood slivers cut from logs. It is mainly used in packaging, for cooling...
- Steel wool, also known as iron wool, wire wool, steel wire or wire sponge, is a bundle of very fine and flexible sharp-edged steel filaments. It was described...
- Breeda Wool is an American actress, writer and producer. She is best known for her roles as Lou Linklatter in the Audience crime drama series Mr. Mercedes...
- Wool is the fibre commonly produced from sheep Wool (the fiber) refers to one of the following: Alpaca wool, derived from fur of alpacas Angora wool, derived...
- is also known for its silky texture. It is much warmer and lighter than wool due to the hollow core of the angora fibre. It also gives them[clarification...
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