Definition of Cloth. Meaning of Cloth. Synonyms of Cloth

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Definition of Cloth

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Altar cloth
Altar Al"tar, n. [OE. alter, auter, autier, fr. L. altare, pl. altaria, altar, prob. fr. altus high: cf. OF. alter, autier, F. autel. Cf. Altitude.] 1. A raised structure (as a square or oblong erection of stone or wood) on which sacrifices are offered or incense burned to a deity. Noah builded an altar unto the Lord. --Gen. viii. 20. 2. In the Christian church, a construction of stone, wood, or other material for the celebration of the Holy Eucharist; the communion table. Note: Altar is much used adjectively, or as the first part of a compound; as, altar bread or altar-bread. Altar cloth or Altar-cloth, the cover for an altar in a Christian church, usually richly embroidered. Altar cushion, a cushion laid upon the altar in a Christian church to support the service book. Altar frontal. See Frontal. Altar rail, the railing in front of the altar or communion table. Altar screen, a wall or partition built behind an altar to protect it from approach in the rear. Altar tomb, a tomb resembling an altar in shape, etc. Family altar, place of family devotions. To lead (as a bride) to the altar, to marry; -- said of a woman.
Altar-cloth
Altar Al"tar, n. [OE. alter, auter, autier, fr. L. altare, pl. altaria, altar, prob. fr. altus high: cf. OF. alter, autier, F. autel. Cf. Altitude.] 1. A raised structure (as a square or oblong erection of stone or wood) on which sacrifices are offered or incense burned to a deity. Noah builded an altar unto the Lord. --Gen. viii. 20. 2. In the Christian church, a construction of stone, wood, or other material for the celebration of the Holy Eucharist; the communion table. Note: Altar is much used adjectively, or as the first part of a compound; as, altar bread or altar-bread. Altar cloth or Altar-cloth, the cover for an altar in a Christian church, usually richly embroidered. Altar cushion, a cushion laid upon the altar in a Christian church to support the service book. Altar frontal. See Frontal. Altar rail, the railing in front of the altar or communion table. Altar screen, a wall or partition built behind an altar to protect it from approach in the rear. Altar tomb, a tomb resembling an altar in shape, etc. Family altar, place of family devotions. To lead (as a bride) to the altar, to marry; -- said of a woman.
Barmcloth
Barmcloth Barm"cloth`, n. Apron. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Bearing cloth
Bearing cloth Bear"ing cloth` A cloth with which a child is covered when carried to be baptized. --Shak.
Bedclothes
Bedclothes Bed"clothes`, n. pl. Blankets, sheets, coverlets, etc., for a bed. --Shak.
Body clothes
Clothes Clothes (? or ?; 277), n. pl. [From Cloth.] 1. Covering for the human body; dress; vestments; vesture; -- a general term for whatever covering is worn, or is made to be worn, for decency or comfort. She . . . speaks well, and has excellent good clothes. --Shak. If I may touch but his clothes, I shall be whole. --Mark. v. 28. 2. The covering of a bed; bedclothes. She turned each way her frighted head, Then sunk it deep beneath the clothes. --Prior. Body clothes. See under Body. Clothes moth (Zo["o]l.), a small moth of the genus Tinea. The most common species (T. flavifrontella)is yellowish white. The larv[ae] eat woolen goods, furs, feathers, etc. They live in tubular cases made of the material upon which they feed, fastened together with silk. Syn: Garments; dress; clothing; apparel; attire; vesture; raiment; garb; costume; habit; habiliments.
Bolting cloth
Bolting Bolt"ing, n. 1. A sifting, as of flour or meal. 2. (Law) A private arguing of cases for practice by students, as in the Inns of Court. [Obs.] Bolting cloth, wire, hair, silk, or other sieve cloth of different degrees of fineness; -- used by millers for sifting flour. --McElrath. Bolting hutch, a bin or tub for the bolted flour or meal; (fig.) a receptacle.
Breechcloth
Breechcloth Breech"cloth`, n. A cloth worn around the breech.
Carborundum cloth
Carborundum cloth Carborundum cloth or paper paper . Cloth or paper covered with powdered carborundum.
Card clothing
Card Card, n. [F. carde teasel, the head of a thistle, card, from L. carduus, cardus, thistle, fr. carere to card.] 1. An instrument for disentangling and arranging the fibers of cotton, wool, flax, etc.; or for cleaning and smoothing the hair of animals; -- usually consisting of bent wire teeth set closely in rows in a thick piece of leather fastened to a back. 2. A roll or sliver of fiber (as of wool) delivered from a carding machine. Card clothing, strips of wire-toothed card used for covering the cylinders of carding machines.
Cerecloth
Cerecloth Cere"cloth`, n. [L. cera wax + E. cloth.] A cloth smeared with melted wax, or with some gummy or glutinous matter. Linen, besmeared with gums, in manner of cerecloth. --Bacon.
Cheese cloth
Cheese cloth Cheese" cloth` A thin, loosewoven cotton cloth, such as is used in pressing cheese curds.
Cloth of gold
Noisette Noi*sette", n. (Bot.) A hybrid rose produced in 1817, by a French gardener, Noisette, of Charleston, South Carolina, from the China rose and the musk rose. It has given rise to many fine varieties, as the Lamarque, the Marechal (or Marshal) Niel, and the Cloth of gold. Most roses of this class have clustered flowers and are of vigorous growth. --P. Henderson.
Clothe
Clothe Clothe, v. i. To wear clothes. [Poetic] Care no more to clothe eat. --Shak.
Clothes
Clothes Clothes (? or ?; 277), n. pl. [From Cloth.] 1. Covering for the human body; dress; vestments; vesture; -- a general term for whatever covering is worn, or is made to be worn, for decency or comfort. She . . . speaks well, and has excellent good clothes. --Shak. If I may touch but his clothes, I shall be whole. --Mark. v. 28. 2. The covering of a bed; bedclothes. She turned each way her frighted head, Then sunk it deep beneath the clothes. --Prior. Body clothes. See under Body. Clothes moth (Zo["o]l.), a small moth of the genus Tinea. The most common species (T. flavifrontella)is yellowish white. The larv[ae] eat woolen goods, furs, feathers, etc. They live in tubular cases made of the material upon which they feed, fastened together with silk. Syn: Garments; dress; clothing; apparel; attire; vesture; raiment; garb; costume; habit; habiliments.
Clothes moth
Clothes Clothes (? or ?; 277), n. pl. [From Cloth.] 1. Covering for the human body; dress; vestments; vesture; -- a general term for whatever covering is worn, or is made to be worn, for decency or comfort. She . . . speaks well, and has excellent good clothes. --Shak. If I may touch but his clothes, I shall be whole. --Mark. v. 28. 2. The covering of a bed; bedclothes. She turned each way her frighted head, Then sunk it deep beneath the clothes. --Prior. Body clothes. See under Body. Clothes moth (Zo["o]l.), a small moth of the genus Tinea. The most common species (T. flavifrontella)is yellowish white. The larv[ae] eat woolen goods, furs, feathers, etc. They live in tubular cases made of the material upon which they feed, fastened together with silk. Syn: Garments; dress; clothing; apparel; attire; vesture; raiment; garb; costume; habit; habiliments.
Clotheshorse
Clotheshorse Clothes"horse`, n. A frame to hang clothes on.
Clothesline
Clothesline Clothes"line`, n. A rope or wire on which clothes are hung to dry.
Clothespin
Clothespin Clothes"pin` (? or ?), n. A forked piece of wood, or a small spring clamp, used for fastening clothes on a line.
Clothespress
Clothespress Clothes"press`, n. A receptacle for clothes.
Clothier
Clothier Cloth"ier, n. 1. One who makes cloths; one who dresses or fulls cloth. --Hayward. 2. One who sells cloth or clothes, or who makes and sells clothes.
Clothing
Clothing Cloth"ing, n. 1. Garments in general; clothes; dress; raiment; covering. From others he shall stand in need of nothing, Yet on his brothers shall depend for clothing. --Milton. As for me, . . . my clothing was sackloth. --Ps. xxxv. 13 2. The art of process of making cloth. [R.] Instructing [refugees] in the art of clothing. --Ray. 3. A covering of non-conducting material on the outside of a boiler, or steam chamber, to prevent radiation of heat. --Knight. 4. (Mach.) See Card clothing, under 3d Card.
Clotho nasicornis
River Riv"er, n. [F. riv[`e]re a river, LL. riparia river, bank of a river, fr. L. riparius belonging to a bank or shore, fr. ripa a bank or shore; of uncertain origin. Cf. Arrive, Riparian.] 1. A large stream of water flowing in a bed or channel and emptying into the ocean, a sea, a lake, or another stream; a stream larger than a rivulet or brook. Transparent and sparkling rivers, from which it is delightful to drink as they flow. --Macaulay. 2. Fig.: A large stream; copious flow; abundance; as, rivers of blood; rivers of oil. River chub (Zo["o]l.), the hornyhead and allied species of fresh-water fishes. River crab (Zo["o]l.), any species of fresh-water crabs of the genus Thelphusa, as T. depressa of Southern Europe. River dragon, a crocodile; -- applied by Milton to the king of Egypt. River driver, a lumberman who drives or conducts logs down rivers. --Bartlett. River duck (Zo["o]l.), any species of duck belonging to Anas, Spatula, and allied genera, in which the hind toe is destitute of a membranous lobe, as in the mallard and pintail; -- opposed to sea duck. River god, a deity supposed to preside over a river as its tutelary divinity. River herring (Zo["o]l.), an alewife. River hog. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any species of African wild hogs of the genus Potamoch[oe]rus. They frequent wet places along the rivers. (b) The capybara. River horse (Zo["o]l.), the hippopotamus. River jack (Zo["o]l.), an African puff adder (Clotho nasicornis) having a spine on the nose. River limpet (Zo["o]l.), a fresh-water, air-breathing mollusk of the genus Ancylus, having a limpet-shaped shell. River pirate (Zo["o]l.), the pike. River snail (Zo["o]l.), any species of fresh-water gastropods of Paludina, Melontho, and allied genera. See Pond snail, under Pond. River tortoise (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous fresh-water tortoises inhabiting rivers, especially those of the genus Trionyx and allied genera. See Trionyx.
Clothred
Clothred Clot"hred, p. p. Clottered. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Composition cloth
Composition Com`po*si"tion, n. [F. composition, fr. L. compositio. See Composite.] 1. The act or art of composing, or forming a whole or integral, by placing together and uniting different things, parts, or ingredients. In specific uses: (a) The invention or combination of the parts of any literary work or discourse, or of a work of art; as, the composition of a poem or a piece of music. ``The constant habit of elaborate composition.' --Macaulay. (b) (Fine Arts) The art or practice of so combining the different parts of a work of art as to produce a harmonious whole; also, a work of art considered as such. See 4, below. (c) The act of writing for practice in a language, as English, Latin, German, etc. (d) (Print.) The setting up of type and arranging it for printing. 2. The state of being put together or composed; conjunction; combination; adjustment. View them in composition with other things. --I. Watts. The elementary composition of bodies. --Whewell. 3. A mass or body formed by combining two or more substances; as, a chemical composition. A composition that looks . . . like marble. --Addison. 4. A literary, musical, or artistic production, especially one showing study and care in arrangement; -- often used of an elementary essay or translation done as an educational exercise. 5. Consistency; accord; congruity. [Obs.] There is no composition in these news That gives them credit. --Shak. 6. Mutual agreement to terms or conditions for the settlement of a difference or controversy; also, the terms or conditions of settlement; agreement. Thus we are agreed: I crave our composition may be written. --Shak. 7. (Law) The adjustment of a debt, or avoidance of an obligation, by some form of compensation agreed on between the parties; also, the sum or amount of compensation agreed upon in the adjustment. Compositions for not taking the order of knighthood. --Hallam. Cleared by composition with their creditors. --Blackstone. 8. Synthesis as opposed to analysis. The investigation of difficult things by the method of analysis ought ever to precede the method of composition. --Sir I. Newton. Composition cloth, a kind of cloth covered with a preparation making it waterproof. Composition deed, an agreement for composition between a debtor and several creditors. Composition plane (Crystallog.), the plane by which the two individuals of a twin crystal are united in their reserved positions. Composition of forces (Mech.), the finding of a single force (called the resultant) which shall be equal in effect to two or more given forces (called the components) when acting in given directions. --Herbert. Composition metal, an alloy resembling brass, which is sometimes used instead of copper for sheathing vessels; -- also called Muntz metal and yellow metal. Composition of proportion (Math.), an arrangement of four proportionals so that the sum of the first and second is to the second as the sum of the third and fourth to the fourth.
Corpus Christi cloth
Corpus Cor"pus (-p[u^]s), n.; pl. Corpora (-p[-o]*r[.a]). [L.] A body, living or dead; the corporeal substance of a thing. Corpus callosum (k[a^]l*l[=o]"s[u^]m); pl. Corpora callosa (-s?) [NL., callous body] (Anat.), the great band of commissural fibers uniting the cerebral hemispheres. See Brain. Corpus Christi (kr[i^]s"t[imac]) [L., body of Christ] (R. C. Ch.), a festival in honor of the eucharist, observed on the Thursday after Trinity Sunday. Corpus Christi cloth. Same as Pyx cloth, under Pyx. Corpus delicti (d[-e]*l[i^]k"t[imac]) [L., the body of the crime] (Law), the substantial and fundamental fact of the comission of a crime; the proofs essential to establish a crime. Corpus luteum (l[=u]"t[-e]*[u^]m); pl. Corpora lutea (-[.a]). [NL., luteous body] (Anat.), the reddish yellow mass which fills a ruptured Graafian follicle in the mammalian ovary. Corpus striatum (str[-i]*[=a]"t[u^]m); pl. Corpora striata (-t[.a]). [NL., striate body] (Anat.), a ridge in the wall of each lateral ventricle of the brain.
Crumbcloth
Crumbcloth Crumb"cloth` (-kl?th`; 115), n. A cloth to be laid under a dining table to receive falling fragments, and keep the carpet or floor clean. [Written also crumcloth.]
crumcloth
Crumbcloth Crumb"cloth` (-kl?th`; 115), n. A cloth to be laid under a dining table to receive falling fragments, and keep the carpet or floor clean. [Written also crumcloth.]
Dishcloth
Dishcloth Dish"cloth` (?; 115), n. A cloth used for washing dishes.
drabcloth
Drab Drab, n. [F. drap cloth: LL. drappus, trapus, perh. orig., a firm, solid stuff, cf. F. draper to drape, also to full cloth; prob. of German origin; cf. Icel. drepa to beat, strike, AS. drepan, G. treffen; perh. akin to E. drub. Cf. Drape, Trappings.] 1. A kind of thick woolen cloth of a dun, or dull brownish yellow, or dull gray, color; -- called also drabcloth. 2. A dull brownish yellow or dull gray color.

Meaning of Cloth from wikipedia

- crocheting, knotting, felting, or braiding. The related words "fabric" and "cloth" are often used in textile ****embly trades (such as tailoring and dressmaking)...
- The Cloth is a 2013 American horror/thriller film that was written and directed by Justin Price, who based it upon his book of the same title. The film...
- Chino cloth (/ˈtʃiːnoʊ/ CHEE-noh) is a twill fabric, originally made of 100% cotton. The most common items made from it, trousers, are widely called chinos...
- A Touch of Cloth is a British television comedy police procedural series created and written by Charlie Brooker and Daniel Maier. It is a parody of British...
- Melton cloth is traditionally made of wool and is woven in a twill form. It is thick, due to having been well fulled, which gives it a felt-like smooth...
- stitched together. The word corduroy is from cord and duroy, a co**** woollen cloth made in England in the 18th century. The interpretation of the word as corde...
- made almost exclusively out of linen. The inner layer of fine composite cloth garments (as for example jackets) was traditionally made of linen, hence...
- Non-split microfiber is little more than a very soft cloth. The main exception is for cloths used for facial cleansing and for the removal of skin oils...
- Emery cloth is a type of coated abrasive that has emery glued to a cloth backing. It is used for hand metalworking. It may be sold in sheets or in narrow...
- stiff satin. Faconne is jacquard woven satin. Farmer's satin or Venetian cloth is made from mercerised cotton. Gattar is satin made with a silk warp and...
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