Definition of Use. Meaning of Use. Synonyms of Use

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Definition of Use

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Abstruse
Abstruse Ab*struse", a. [L. abstrusus, p. p. of abstrudere to thrust away, conceal; ab, abs + trudere to thrust; cf. F. abstrus. See Threat.] 1. Concealed or hidden out of the way. [Obs.] The eternal eye whose sight discerns Abstrusest thoughts. --Milton. 2. Remote from apprehension; difficult to be comprehended or understood; recondite; as, abstruse learning. Profound and abstruse topics. --Milman.
Abstrusely
Abstrusely Ab*struse"ly, adv. In an abstruse manner.
Abstruseness
Abstruseness Ab*struse"ness, n. The quality of being abstruse; difficulty of apprehension. --Boyle.
Abuse
Abuse A*buse", n. [F. abus, L. abusus, fr. abuti. See Abuse, v. t.] 1. Improper treatment or use; application to a wrong or bad purpose; misuse; as, an abuse of our natural powers; an abuse of civil rights, or of privileges or advantages; an abuse of language. Liberty may be endangered by the abuses of liberty, as well as by the abuses of power. --Madison. 2. Physical ill treatment; injury. ``Rejoice . . . at the abuse of Falstaff.' --Shak. 3. A corrupt practice or custom; offense; crime; fault; as, the abuses in the civil service. Abuse after disappeared without a struggle.. --Macaulay. 4. Vituperative words; coarse, insulting speech; abusive language; virulent condemnation; reviling. The two parties, after exchanging a good deal of abuse, came to blows. --Macaulay. 5. Violation; rape; as, abuse of a female child. [Obs.] Or is it some abuse, and no such thing? --Shak. Abuse of distress (Law), a wrongful using of an animal or chattel distrained, by the distrainer. Syn: Invective; contumely; reproach; scurrility; insult; opprobrium. Usage: Abuse, Invective. Abuse is generally prompted by anger, and vented in harsh and unseemly words. It is more personal and coarse than invective. Abuse generally takes place in private quarrels; invective in writing or public discussions. Invective may be conveyed in refined language and dictated by indignation against what is blameworthy. --C. J. Smith.
Abuse of distress
Abuse A*buse", n. [F. abus, L. abusus, fr. abuti. See Abuse, v. t.] 1. Improper treatment or use; application to a wrong or bad purpose; misuse; as, an abuse of our natural powers; an abuse of civil rights, or of privileges or advantages; an abuse of language. Liberty may be endangered by the abuses of liberty, as well as by the abuses of power. --Madison. 2. Physical ill treatment; injury. ``Rejoice . . . at the abuse of Falstaff.' --Shak. 3. A corrupt practice or custom; offense; crime; fault; as, the abuses in the civil service. Abuse after disappeared without a struggle.. --Macaulay. 4. Vituperative words; coarse, insulting speech; abusive language; virulent condemnation; reviling. The two parties, after exchanging a good deal of abuse, came to blows. --Macaulay. 5. Violation; rape; as, abuse of a female child. [Obs.] Or is it some abuse, and no such thing? --Shak. Abuse of distress (Law), a wrongful using of an animal or chattel distrained, by the distrainer. Syn: Invective; contumely; reproach; scurrility; insult; opprobrium. Usage: Abuse, Invective. Abuse is generally prompted by anger, and vented in harsh and unseemly words. It is more personal and coarse than invective. Abuse generally takes place in private quarrels; invective in writing or public discussions. Invective may be conveyed in refined language and dictated by indignation against what is blameworthy. --C. J. Smith.
Abuseful
Abuseful A*buse"ful, a. Full of abuse; abusive. [R.] ``Abuseful names.' --Bp. Barlow.
Abuser
Abuser A*bus"er, n. One who abuses [in the various senses of the verb].
Accoucheuse
Accoucheuse Ac*cou*cheuse", n. [F.., fem. of accoucher.] A midwife. [Recent] --Dunglison.
Accuse
Accuse Ac*cuse", n. Accusation. [Obs.] --Shak.
Accuse
Accuse Ac*cuse", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Accused; p. pr. & vb. n. Accusing.] [OF. acuser, F. accuser, L. accusare, to call to account, accuse; ad + causa cause, lawsuit. Cf. Cause.] 1. To charge with, or declare to have committed, a crime or offense; (Law) to charge with an offense, judicially or by a public process; -- with of; as, to accuse one of a high crime or misdemeanor. Neither can they prove the things whereof they now accuse me. --Acts xxiv. 13. We are accused of having persuaded Austria and Sardinia to lay down their arms. --Macaulay. 2. To charge with a fault; to blame; to censure. Their thoughts the meanwhile accusing or else excusing one another. --Rom. ii. 15. 3. To betray; to show. [L.] --Sir P. Sidney. Syn: To charge; blame; censure; reproach; criminate; indict; impeach; arraign. Usage: To Accuse, Charge, Impeach, Arraign. These words agree in bringing home to a person the imputation of wrongdoing. To accuse is a somewhat formal act, and is applied usually (though not exclusively) to crimes; as, to accuse of treason. Charge is the most generic. It may refer to a crime, a dereliction of duty, a fault, etc.; more commonly it refers to moral delinquencies; as, to charge with dishonesty or falsehood. To arraign is to bring (a person) before a tribunal for trial; as, to arraign one before a court or at the bar public opinion. To impeach is officially to charge with misbehavior in office; as, to impeach a minister of high crimes. Both impeach and arraign convey the idea of peculiar dignity or impressiveness.
Accused
Accused Ac*cused", a. Charged with offense; as, an accused person. Note: Commonly used substantively; as, the accused, one charged with an offense; the defendant in a criminal case.
Accused
Accuse Ac*cuse", v. t. [imp. & p. p. Accused; p. pr. & vb. n. Accusing.] [OF. acuser, F. accuser, L. accusare, to call to account, accuse; ad + causa cause, lawsuit. Cf. Cause.] 1. To charge with, or declare to have committed, a crime or offense; (Law) to charge with an offense, judicially or by a public process; -- with of; as, to accuse one of a high crime or misdemeanor. Neither can they prove the things whereof they now accuse me. --Acts xxiv. 13. We are accused of having persuaded Austria and Sardinia to lay down their arms. --Macaulay. 2. To charge with a fault; to blame; to censure. Their thoughts the meanwhile accusing or else excusing one another. --Rom. ii. 15. 3. To betray; to show. [L.] --Sir P. Sidney. Syn: To charge; blame; censure; reproach; criminate; indict; impeach; arraign. Usage: To Accuse, Charge, Impeach, Arraign. These words agree in bringing home to a person the imputation of wrongdoing. To accuse is a somewhat formal act, and is applied usually (though not exclusively) to crimes; as, to accuse of treason. Charge is the most generic. It may refer to a crime, a dereliction of duty, a fault, etc.; more commonly it refers to moral delinquencies; as, to charge with dishonesty or falsehood. To arraign is to bring (a person) before a tribunal for trial; as, to arraign one before a court or at the bar public opinion. To impeach is officially to charge with misbehavior in office; as, to impeach a minister of high crimes. Both impeach and arraign convey the idea of peculiar dignity or impressiveness.
Accusement
Accusement Ac*cuse"ment (-k[=u]z"ment), n. [OF. acusement. See Accuse.] Accusation. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Accuser
Accuser Ac*cus"er, n. [OE. acuser, accusour; cf. OF. acuseor, fr. L. accusator, fr. accusare.] One who accuses; one who brings a charge of crime or fault.
Affuse
Affuse Af*fuse" ([a^]f*f[=u]z"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Affused (-f[=u]zd"); p. pr. & vb. n. Affusing.] [L. affusus, p. p. of affundere to pour to; ad + fundere. See Fuse.] To pour out or upon. [R.] I first affused water upon the compressed beans. --Boyle.
Affused
Affuse Af*fuse" ([a^]f*f[=u]z"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Affused (-f[=u]zd"); p. pr. & vb. n. Affusing.] [L. affusus, p. p. of affundere to pour to; ad + fundere. See Fuse.] To pour out or upon. [R.] I first affused water upon the compressed beans. --Boyle.
Agnuses
Agnus Ag"nus, n.; pl. E. Agnuses; L. Agni. [L., a lamb.] Agnus Dei.
Alehouse
Alehouse Ale"house`, n. A house where ale is retailed; hence, a tippling house. --Macaulay.
Almshouse
Almshouse Alms"house`, n. A house appropriated for the use of the poor; a poorhouse.
Amenuse
Amenuse Am"e*nuse, v. t. [OF. amenuisier. See Minute.] To lessen. [Obs.] --Chaucer.
Amuse
Amuse A*muse" ([.a]*m[=u]z"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Amused ([.a]*m[=u]zd"); p. pr. & vb. n. Amusing.] [F. amuser to make stay, to detain, to amuse, [`a] (L. ad) + OF. muser. See Muse, v.] 1. To occupy or engage the attention of; to lose in deep thought; to absorb; also, to distract; to bewilder. [Obs.] Camillus set upon the Gauls when they were amused in receiving their gold. --Holland. Being amused with grief, fear, and fright, he could not find the house. --Fuller. 2. To entertain or occupy in a pleasant manner; to stir with pleasing or mirthful emotions; to divert. A group of children amusing themselves with pushing stones from the top [of the cliff], and watching as they plunged into the lake. --Gilpin. 3. To keep in expectation; to beguile; to delude. He amused his followers with idle promises. --Johnson. Syn: To entertain; gratify; please; divert; beguile; deceive; occupy. Usage: To Amuse, Divert, Entertain. We are amused by that which occupies us lightly and pleasantly. We are entertained by that which brings our minds into agreeable contact with others, as conversation, or a book. We are diverted by that which turns off our thoughts to something of livelier interest, especially of a sportive nature, as a humorous story, or a laughable incident. Whatever amuses serves to kill time, to lull the faculties, and to banish reflection. Whatever entertains usually awakens the understanding or gratifies the fancy. Whatever diverts is lively in its nature, and sometimes tumultuous in its effects. --Crabb.
Amuse
Amuse A*muse", v. i. To muse; to mediate. [Obs.]
Amused
Amuse A*muse" ([.a]*m[=u]z"), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Amused ([.a]*m[=u]zd"); p. pr. & vb. n. Amusing.] [F. amuser to make stay, to detain, to amuse, [`a] (L. ad) + OF. muser. See Muse, v.] 1. To occupy or engage the attention of; to lose in deep thought; to absorb; also, to distract; to bewilder. [Obs.] Camillus set upon the Gauls when they were amused in receiving their gold. --Holland. Being amused with grief, fear, and fright, he could not find the house. --Fuller. 2. To entertain or occupy in a pleasant manner; to stir with pleasing or mirthful emotions; to divert. A group of children amusing themselves with pushing stones from the top [of the cliff], and watching as they plunged into the lake. --Gilpin. 3. To keep in expectation; to beguile; to delude. He amused his followers with idle promises. --Johnson. Syn: To entertain; gratify; please; divert; beguile; deceive; occupy. Usage: To Amuse, Divert, Entertain. We are amused by that which occupies us lightly and pleasantly. We are entertained by that which brings our minds into agreeable contact with others, as conversation, or a book. We are diverted by that which turns off our thoughts to something of livelier interest, especially of a sportive nature, as a humorous story, or a laughable incident. Whatever amuses serves to kill time, to lull the faculties, and to banish reflection. Whatever entertains usually awakens the understanding or gratifies the fancy. Whatever diverts is lively in its nature, and sometimes tumultuous in its effects. --Crabb.
Amused
Amused A*mused", a. 1. Diverted. 2. Expressing amusement; as, an amused look.
Amusement
Amusement A*muse"ment, n. [Cf. F. amusement.] 1. Deep thought; muse. [Obs.] Here I . . . fell into a strong and deep amusement, revolving in my mind, with great perplexity, the amazing change of our affairs. --Fleetwood. 2. The state of being amused; pleasurable excitement; that which amuses; diversion. His favorite amusements were architecture and gardening. --Macaulay. Syn: Diversion; entertainment; recreation; relaxation; pastime; sport.
Amuser
Amuser A*mus"er (-[~e]r), n. One who amuses.
Amusette
Amusette Am`u*sette", n. [F.] A light field cannon, or stocked gun mounted on a swivel.
Apartment house
Apartment house A*part"ment house A building comprising a number of suites designed for separate housekeeping tenements, but having conveniences, such as heat, light, elevator service, etc., furnished in common; -- often distinguished in the United States from a flat house.
Apparatuses
Apparatus Ap"pa*ratus, n.; pl. Apparatus, also rarely Apparatuses. [L., from apparare, apparatum, to prepare; ad + prepare to make ready.] 1. Things provided as means to some end. 2. Hence: A full collection or set of implements, or utensils, for a given duty, experimental or operative; any complex instrument or appliance, mechanical or chemical, for a specific action or operation; machinery; mechanism. 3. (Physiol.) A collection of organs all of which unite in a common function; as, the respiratory apparatus.
Applause
Applause Ap*plause", n. [L. applaudere, applausum. See Applaud.] The act of applauding; approbation and praise publicly expressed by clapping the hands, stamping or tapping with the feet, acclamation, huzzas, or other means; marked commendation. The brave man seeks not popular applause. --Dryden. Syn: Acclaim; acclamation; plaudit; commendation; approval.

Meaning of Use from wikipedia

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- USE or U.S.E. may refer to: United States of Europe, hypothetical scenario of a single sovereign country in Europe United State of Electronica, an American...
- Fair use is a doctrine in the law of the United States that permits limited use of copyrighted material without having to first acquire permission from...
- Usability can be described as the capacity of a system to provide a condition for its users to perform the tasks safely, effectively, and efficiently...
- Used may refer to: Used good, goods of any type that have been used before or pre-owned Used to, English auxiliary verb Used, Huesca, a village in Huesca...
- The Used is an American rock band from Orem, Utah that formed in 2001. The group consists of vocalist Bert McCracken, b****ist Jeph Howard, drummer Dan...
- Prior to European colonization of the Americas, indigenous peoples used controlled burns to modify the landscape. These controlled fires were part of the...
- Nonconforming use is a type of zoning variance where a parcel of land may be given an exception from current zoning ordinances due to improvements made...
- Land use involves the management and modification of natural environment or wilderness into built environment such as settlements and semi-natural habitats...
- Profane use is a term used in the Roman Catholic Church to refer to closed parish churches that will no longer be used as churches. This is often done...
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