Definition of Cause. Meaning of Cause. Synonyms of Cause

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Cause. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Cause and, of course, Cause synonyms and on the right images related to the word Cause.

Definition of Cause

Cause
Cause Cause (k[add]z), n. [F. cause, fr. L. causa. Cf. Cause, v., Kickshaw.] 1. That which produces or effects a result; that from which anything proceeds, and without which it would not exist. Cause is substance exerting its power into act, to make one thing begin to be. --Locke. 2. That which is the occasion of an action or state; ground; reason; motive; as, cause for rejoicing. 3. Sake; interest; advantage. [Obs.] I did it not for his cause. --2 Cor. vii. 12. 4. (Law) A suit or action in court; any legal process by which a party endeavors to obtain his claim, or what he regards as his right; case; ground of action. 5. Any subject of discussion or debate; matter; question; affair in general. What counsel give you in this weighty cause! --Shak. 6. The side of a question, which is espoused, advocated, and upheld by a person or party; a principle which is advocated; that which a person or party seeks to attain. God befriend us, as our cause is just. --Shak. The part they take against me is from zeal to the cause. --Burke. Efficient cause, the agent or force that produces a change or result. Final cause, the end, design, or object, for which anything is done. Formal cause, the elements of a conception which make the conception or the thing conceived to be what it is; or the idea viewed as a formative principle and co["o]perating with the matter. Material cause, that of which anything is made. Proximate cause. See under Proximate. To make common cause with, to join with in purposes and aims. --Macaulay. Syn: Origin; source; mainspring; motive; reason; incitement; inducement; purpose; object; suit; action.
Cause
Cause Cause, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Caused; p. pr. & v. n. Causing.] [F. causer, fr. cause, fr. L. causa. See Cause, n., and cf. Acouse.] To effect as an agent; to produce; to be the occasion of; to bring about; to bring into existence; to make; -- usually followed by an infinitive, sometimes by that with a finite verb. I will cause it to rain upon the earth forty days. --Gen. vii. 4. Cause that it be read also in the church of the Laodiceans. --Col. iv. 16. Syn: To create; produce; beget; effect; occasion; originate; induce; bring about.
Cause
Cause Cause, v. i. To assign or show cause; to give a reason; to make excuse. [Obs.] --Spenser.
Cause
Cause Cause, conj. Abbreviation of Because. --B. Jonson.

Meaning of Cause from wikipedia

- (also referred to as causation, or cause and effect) is influence by which one event, process, state, or object (a cause) contributes to the production of...
- The questionable cause—also known as causal fallacy, false cause, or non causa pro causa ("non-cause for cause" in Latin)—is a category of informal fallacies...
- A cause célèbre (/ˈkɔːz səˈlɛbrə/, /ˈkɔːz səˈlɛb/, French: [koz selɛbʁ]; pl. causes célèbres, pronounced like singular) is an issue or incident arousing...
- The Cause may refer to: The American Revolution A euphemism for Irish republicanism A euphemism for Confederate secession during the American Civil War...
- Just Cause may refer to: Just cause (employment law), a common standard in United States labor arbitration, and a reason for termination of employment...
- statistics, cause of death is an official determination of conditions resulting in a human's death, which may be recorded on a death certificate. A cause of death...
- Root cause may refer to: "Root Cause" (Person of Interest), a TV show episode Root cause analysis, a problem solving technique This disambiguation page...
- The four causes or four explanations are, in Aristotelian thought, four fundamental types of answer to the question "why?", in analysis of change or movement...
- injury. There are two types of causation in the law: cause-in-fact, and proximate (or legal) cause. Cause-in-fact is determined by the "but for" test: But...
- an article on "'cause", but our sister project Wiktionary does: Read the Wiktionary entry on "'cause" You can also: Search for 'Cause in Wikipedia to...