Definition of Thistle. Meaning of Thistle. Synonyms of Thistle

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Definition of Thistle

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Blessed thistle
Blessed thistle Bless"ed this"tle See under Thistle.
Carline thistle
Carline thistle Car"line this`tle [F. carline, It., Sp., & Pg., carlina. Said to be so called from the Emperor Charlemagne, whose army is reputed to have used it as a remedy for pestilence.] (Bot.) A prickly plant of the genus Carlina (C. vulgaris), found in Europe and Asia.
Globe thistle
Globe Globe, n. [L. globus, perh. akin to L. glomus a ball of yarn, and E. clump, golf: cf. F. globe.] 1. A round or spherical body, solid or hollow; a body whose surface is in every part equidistant from the center; a ball; a sphere. 2. Anything which is nearly spherical or globular in shape; as, the globe of the eye; the globe of a lamp. 3. The earth; the terraqueous ball; -- usually preceded by the definite article. --Locke. 4. A round model of the world; a spherical representation of the earth or heavens; as, a terrestrial or celestial globe; -- called also artificial globe. 5. A body of troops, or of men or animals, drawn up in a circle; -- a military formation used by the Romans, answering to the modern infantry square. Him round A globe of fiery seraphim inclosed. --Milton. Globe amaranth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Gomphrena (G. globosa), bearing round heads of variously colored flowers, which long retain color when gathered. Globe animalcule, a small, globular, locomotive organism (Volvox globator), once throught to be an animal, afterward supposed to be a colony of microscopic alg[ae]. Globe of compression (Mil.), a kind of mine producing a wide crater; -- called also overcharged mine. Globe daisy (Bot.), a plant or flower of the genus Globularing, common in Europe. The flowers are minute and form globular heads. Globe sight, a form of front sight placed on target rifles. Globe slater (Zo["o]l.), an isopod crustacean of the genus Spheroma. Globe thistle (Bot.), a thistlelike plant with the flowers in large globular heads (Cynara Scolymus); also, certain species of the related genus Echinops. Globe valve. (a) A ball valve. (b) A valve inclosed in a globular chamber. --Knight.
Hedgehog thistle
Hedgehog Hedge"hog`, n. 1. (Zo["o]l.) A small European insectivore (Erinaceus Europ[ae]us), and other allied species of Asia and Africa, having the hair on the upper part of its body mixed with prickles or spines. It is able to roll itself into a ball so as to present the spines outwardly in every direction. It is nocturnal in its habits, feeding chiefly upon insects. 2. (Zo["o]l.) The Canadian porcupine.[U.S] 3. (Bot.) A species of Medicago (M. intertexta), the pods of which are armed with short spines; -- popularly so called. --Loudon. 4. A form of dredging machine. --Knight. Hedgehog caterpillar (Zo["o]l.), the hairy larv[ae] of several species of bombycid moths, as of the Isabella moth. It curls up like a hedgehog when disturbed. See Woolly bear, and Isabella moth. Hedgehog fish (Zo["o]l.), any spinose plectognath fish, esp. of the genus Diodon; the porcupine fish. Hedgehog grass (Bot.), a grass with spiny involucres, growing on sandy shores; burgrass (Cenchrus tribuloides). Hedgehog rat (Zo["o]l.), one of several West Indian rodents, allied to the porcupines, but with ratlike tails, and few quills, or only stiff bristles. The hedgehog rats belong to Capromys, Plagiodon, and allied genera. Hedgehog shell (Zo["o]l.), any spinose, marine, univalve shell of the genus Murex. Hedgehog thistle (Bot.), a plant of the Cactus family, globular in form, and covered with spines (Echinocactus). Sea hedgehog. See Diodon.
Milk thistle
Milk Milk, n. [AS. meoluc, meoloc, meolc, milc; akin to OFries. meloc, D. melk, G. milch, OHG. miluh, Icel. mj?ok, Sw. mj["o]lk, Dan. melk, Goth. miluks, G. melken to milk, OHG. melchan, Lith. milszti, L. mulgere, Gr. ?. ????. Cf. Milch, Emulsion, Milt soft roe of fishes.] 1. (Physiol.) A white fluid secreted by the mammary glands of female mammals for the nourishment of their young, consisting of minute globules of fat suspended in a solution of casein, albumin, milk sugar, and inorganic salts. ``White as morne milk.' --Chaucer. 2. (Bot.) A kind of juice or sap, usually white in color, found in certain plants; latex. See Latex. 3. An emulsion made by bruising seeds; as, the milk of almonds, produced by pounding almonds with sugar and water. 4. (Zo["o]l.) The ripe, undischarged spat of an oyster. Condensed milk. See under Condense, v. t. Milk crust (Med.), vesicular eczema occurring on the face and scalp of nursing infants. See Eczema. Milk fever. (a) (Med.) A fever which accompanies or precedes the first lactation. It is usually transitory. (b) (Vet. Surg.) A form puerperal peritonitis in cattle; also, a variety of meningitis occurring in cows after calving. Milk glass, glass having a milky appearance. Milk knot (Med.), a hard lump forming in the breast of a nursing woman, due to obstruction to the flow of milk and congestion of the mammary glands. Milk leg (Med.), a swollen condition of the leg, usually in puerperal women, caused by an inflammation of veins, and characterized by a white appearance occasioned by an accumulation of serum and sometimes of pus in the cellular tissue. Milk meats, food made from milk, as butter and cheese. [Obs.] --Bailey. Milk mirror. Same as Escutcheon, 2. Milk molar (Anat.), one of the deciduous molar teeth which are shed and replaced by the premolars. Milk of lime (Chem.), a watery emulsion of calcium hydrate, produced by macerating quicklime in water. Milk parsley (Bot.), an umbelliferous plant (Peucedanum palustre) of Europe and Asia, having a milky juice. Milk pea (Bot.), a genus (Galactia) of leguminous and, usually, twining plants. Milk sickness (Med.), a peculiar malignant disease, occurring in some parts of the Western United States, and affecting certain kinds of farm stock (esp. cows), and persons who make use of the meat or dairy products of infected cattle. Its chief symptoms in man are uncontrollable vomiting, obstinate constipation, pain, and muscular tremors. Its origin in cattle has been variously ascribed to the presence of certain plants in their food, and to polluted drinking water. Milk snake (Zo["o]l.), a harmless American snake (Ophibolus triangulus, or O. eximius). It is variously marked with white, gray, and red. Called also milk adder, chicken snake, house snake, etc. Milk sugar. (Physiol. Chem.) See Lactose, and Sugar of milk (below). Milk thistle (Bot.), an esculent European thistle (Silybum marianum), having the veins of its leaves of a milky whiteness. Milk thrush. (Med.) See Thrush. Milk tooth (Anat.), one of the temporary first set of teeth in young mammals; in man there are twenty. Milk tree (Bot.), a tree yielding a milky juice, as the cow tree of South America (Brosimum Galactodendron), and the Euphorbia balsamifera of the Canaries, the milk of both of which is wholesome food. Milk vessel (Bot.), a special cell in the inner bark of a plant, or a series of cells, in which the milky juice is contained. See Latex. Rock milk. See Agaric mineral, under Agaric. Sugar of milk. The sugar characteristic of milk; a hard white crystalline slightly sweet substance obtained by evaporation of the whey of milk. It is used in pellets and powder as a vehicle for homeopathic medicines, and as an article of diet. See Lactose.
Piney thistle
Piney Pin"ey, a. [Of East Indian origin.] A term used in designating an East Indian tree (the Vateria Indica or piney tree, of the order Dipterocarpe[ae], which grows in Malabar, etc.) or its products. Piney dammar, Piney resin, Piney varnish, a pellucid, fragrant, acrid, bitter resin, which exudes from the piney tree (Vateria Indica) when wounded. It is used as a varnish, in making candles, and as a substitute for incense and for amber. Called also liquid copal, and white dammar. Piney tallow, a solid fatty substance, resembling tallow, obtained from the roasted seeds of the Vateria Indica; called also dupada oil. Piney thistle (Bot.), a plant (Atractylis gummifera), from the bark of which, when wounded, a gummy substance exudes.
Scotch thistle
Scotch Scotch, a. [Cf. Scottish.] Of or pertaining to Scotland, its language, or its inhabitants; Scottish. Scotch broom (Bot.), the Cytisus scoparius. See Broom. Scotch dipper, or Scotch duck (Zo["o]l.), the bufflehead; -- called also Scotch teal, and Scotchman. Scotch fiddle, the itch. [Low] --Sir W. Scott. Scotch mist, a coarse, dense mist, like fine rain. Scotch nightingale (Zo["o]l.), the sedge warbler. [Prov. Eng.] Scotch pebble. See under pebble. Scotch pine (Bot.) See Riga fir. Scotch thistle (Bot.), a species of thistle (Onopordon acanthium); -- so called from its being the national emblem of the Scotch.
Sow thistle
Sow Sow, n. [OE. sowe, suwe, AS. sugu, akin to s[=u], D. zog, zeug, OHG. s[=u], G. sau, Icel. s[=y]r, Dan. so, Sw. sugga, so, L. sus. Gr. "y^s, sy^s, Zend. hu boar; probably from the root seen in Skr. s[=u] to beget, to bear; the animal being named in allusion to its fecundity. [root]294. Cf. Hyena, Soil to stain, Son, Swine.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) The female of swine, or of the hog kind. 2. (Zo["o]l.) A sow bug. 3. (Metal.) (a) A channel or runner which receives the rows of molds in the pig bed. (b) The bar of metal which remains in such a runner. (c) A mass of solidified metal in a furnace hearth; a salamander. 4. (Mil.) A kind of covered shed, formerly used by besiegers in filling up and passing the ditch of a besieged place, sapping and mining the wall, or the like. --Craig. Sow bread. (Bot.) See Cyclamen. Sow bug, or Sowbug (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of terrestrial Isopoda belonging to Oniscus, Porcellio, and allied genera of the family Oniscid[ae]. They feed chiefly on decaying vegetable substances. Sow thistle [AS. sugepistel] (Bot.), a composite plant (Sonchus oleraceus) said to be eaten by swine and some other animals.
Spear thistle
Spear Spear, n. [OE. spere, AS. spere; akin to D. & G. speer, OS. & OHS. sper, Icel. spj["o]r, pl., Dan. sp[ae]r, L. sparus.] 1. A long, pointed weapon, used in war and hunting, by thrusting or throwing; a weapon with a long shaft and a sharp head or blade; a lance. Note: [See Illust. of Spearhead.] ``A sharp ground spear.' --Chaucer. They shall beat their swords into plowshares, and their spears into pruning hooks. --Micah iv. 3. 2. Fig.: A spearman. --Sir W. Scott. 3. A sharp-pointed instrument with barbs, used for stabbing fish and other animals. 4. A shoot, as of grass; a spire. 5. The feather of a horse. See Feather, n., 4. 6. The rod to which the bucket, or plunger, of a pump is attached; a pump rod. Spear foot, the off hind foot of a horse. Spear grass. (Bot.) (a) The common reed. See Reed, n., 1. (b) meadow grass. See under Meadow. Spear hand, the hand in which a horseman holds a spear; the right hand. --Crabb. Spear side, the male line of a family. --Lowell. Spear thistle (Bot.), the common thistle (Cnicus lanceolatus).
Star thistle
Blazing star, Double star, Multiple star, Shooting star, etc. See under Blazing, Double, etc. Nebulous star (Astron.), a small well-defined circular nebula, having a bright nucleus at its center like a star. Star anise (Bot.), any plant of the genus Illicium; -- so called from its star-shaped capsules. Star apple (Bot.), a tropical American tree (Chrysophyllum Cainito), having a milky juice and oblong leaves with a silky-golden pubescence beneath. It bears an applelike fruit, the carpels of which present a starlike figure when cut across. The name is extended to the whole genus of about sixty species, and the natural order (Sapotace[ae]) to which it belongs is called the Star-apple family. Star conner, one who cons, or studies, the stars; an astronomer or an astrologer. --Gascoigne. Star coral (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of stony corals belonging to Astr[ae]a, Orbicella, and allied genera, in which the calicles are round or polygonal and contain conspicuous radiating septa. Star cucumber. (Bot.) See under Cucumber. Star flower. (Bot.) (a) A plant of the genus Ornithogalum; star-of-Bethlehem. (b) See Starwort (b) . (c) An American plant of the genus Trientalis (Trientalis Americana). --Gray. Star fort (Fort.), a fort surrounded on the exterior with projecting angles; -- whence the name. Star gauge (Ordnance), a long rod, with adjustable points projecting radially at its end, for measuring the size of different parts of the bore of a gun. Star grass. (Bot.) (a) A small grasslike plant (Hypoxis erecta) having star-shaped yellow flowers. (b) The colicroot. See Colicroot. Star hyacinth (Bot.), a bulbous plant of the genus Scilla (S. autumnalis); -- called also star-headed hyacinth. Star jelly (Bot.), any one of several gelatinous plants (Nostoc commune, N. edule, etc.). See Nostoc. Star lizard. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Stellion. Star-of-Bethlehem (Bot.), a bulbous liliaceous plant (Ornithogalum umbellatum) having a small white starlike flower. Star-of-the-earth (Bot.), a plant of the genus Plantago (P. coronopus), growing upon the seashore. Star polygon (Geom.), a polygon whose sides cut each other so as to form a star-shaped figure. Stars and Stripes, a popular name for the flag of the United States, which consists of thirteen horizontal stripes, alternately red and white, and a union having, in a blue field, white stars to represent the several States, one for each. With the old flag, the true American flag, the Eagle, and the Stars and Stripes, waving over the chamber in which we sit. --D. Webster. Star showers. See Shooting star, under Shooting. Star thistle (Bot.), an annual composite plant (Centaurea solstitialis) having the involucre armed with radiating spines. Star wheel (Mach.), a star-shaped disk, used as a kind of ratchet wheel, in repeating watches and the feed motions of some machines. Star worm (Zo["o]l.), a gephyrean. Temporary star (Astron.), a star which appears suddenly, shines for a period, and then nearly or quite disappears. These stars are supposed by some astronometers to be variable stars of long and undetermined periods. Variable star (Astron.), a star whose brilliancy varies periodically, generally with regularity, but sometimes irregularly; -- called periodical star when its changes occur at fixed periods. Water star grass (Bot.), an aquatic plant (Schollera graminea) with small yellow starlike blossoms.
Torch thistle
Torch thistle. (Bot.) See under Thistle.

Meaning of Thistle from wikipedia

- thistle Centaurea – star thistle Cicerbita – sow thistle Cirsiumcommon thistle, field thistle and others Cnicusblessed thistle Cynara – artichoke, cardoon...
- thistle, blessed milkthistle, Marian thistle, Mary thistle, Saint Mary's thistle, Mediterranean milk thistle, variegated thistle and Scotch thistle (though...
- Partick Thistle Football Club (nicknamed the Jags) are a professional football club from Glasgow, Scotland. Despite their name, the club are based at...
- Sow thistle most often refers to yellow flowered, thistle-like plants in the genus Sonchus Sow thistle may also refer to Cicerbita, a genus of plants related...
- The Most Ancient and Most Noble Order of the Thistle is an order of chivalry ****ociated with Scotland. The current version of the Order was founded in...
- unsifted thistles Theophilus Thistle, the Thistle Sifter sifted. If Theophilus Thistle, the Thistle Sifter Sifted a sieve of unsifted thistles, Where is...
- A thistle tube is a piece of laboratory gl****ware consisting of a shaft of tube, with a reservoir and funnel-like section at the top. Thistle tubes are...
- thistle, lettuce from **** thistle, California thistle, corn thistle, cursed thistle, field thistle, green thistle, hard thistle, perennial thistle,...
- Russian thistle is a common name that can refer to: Echinops exaltatus, Russian globe thistle Salsola, some species, including: Salsola kali, also known...
- Thistle Hotels, run by glh., is a UK-based hotel company with a portfolio of 8 Central London hotels and Thistle Poole in Dorset, operating in the three...
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