Definition of S. Meaning of S. Synonyms of S

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A aepypterus
Note: The common or sea lamprey of America and Europe (Petromyzon marinus), which in spring ascends rivers to spawn, is considered excellent food by many, and is sold as a market fish in some localities. The smaller river lampreys mostly belong to the genus Ammoc[oe]les, or Lampetra, as A. fluviatilis, of Europe, and A. [ae]pypterus of America. All lampreys attach themselves to other fishes, as parasites, by means of the suckerlike mouth.
A affinis
2. (Zo["o]l.) A scaup duck. See below. Scaup duck (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of northern ducks of the genus Aythya, or Fuligula. The adult males are, in large part, black. The three North American species are: the greater scaup duck (Aythya marila, var. nearctica), called also broadbill, bluebill, blackhead, flock duck, flocking fowl, and raft duck; the lesser scaup duck (A. affinis), called also little bluebill, river broadbill, and shuffler; the tufted, or ring-necked, scaup duck (A. collaris), called also black jack, ringneck, ringbill, ringbill shuffler, etc. See Illust.. of Ring-necked duck, under Ring-necked. The common European scaup, or mussel, duck (A. marila), closely resembles the American variety.
A agrestis
Vole Vole, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of micelike rodents belonging to Arvicola and allied genera of the subfamily Arvicolin[ae]. They have a thick head, short ears, and a short hairy tail. Note: The water vole, or water rat, of Europe (Arvicola amphibius) is a common large aquatic species. The short-tailed field vole (A. agrestis) of Northern and Central Europe, and Asia, the Southern field vole (A. arvalis), and the Siberian root vole (A. [oe]conomus), are important European species. The common species of the Eastern United States (A. riparius) (called also meadow mouse) and the prairie mouse (A. austerus) are abundant, and often injurious to vegetation. Other species are found in Canada.
A Americanus
Lant Lant, n. [Cf. Lance.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small, slender, marine fishes of the genus Ammedytes. The common European species (A. tobianus) and the American species (A. Americanus) live on sandy shores, buried in the sand, and are caught in large quantities for bait. Called also launce, and sand eel.
A Americanus
Moose Moose, n. [A native name; Knisteneaux mouswah; Algonquin monse. Mackenzie.] (Zo["o]l.) A large cervine mammal (Alces machlis, or A. Americanus), native of the Northern United States and Canada. The adult male is about as large as a horse, and has very large, palmate antlers. It closely resembles the European elk, and by many zo["o]logists is considered the same species. See Elk. Moose bird (Zo["o]l.), the Canada jayor whisky jack. See Whisky jack. Moose deer. Same as Moose. Moose yard (Zo["o]l.), a locality where moose, in winter, herd together in a forest to feed and for mutual protection.
A artemisiaefolia
Bitterweed Bit"ter*weed`, n. (Bot.) A species of Ambrosia (A. artemisi[ae]folia); Roman worm wood. --Gray.
A arvalis
Vole Vole, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of micelike rodents belonging to Arvicola and allied genera of the subfamily Arvicolin[ae]. They have a thick head, short ears, and a short hairy tail. Note: The water vole, or water rat, of Europe (Arvicola amphibius) is a common large aquatic species. The short-tailed field vole (A. agrestis) of Northern and Central Europe, and Asia, the Southern field vole (A. arvalis), and the Siberian root vole (A. [oe]conomus), are important European species. The common species of the Eastern United States (A. riparius) (called also meadow mouse) and the prairie mouse (A. austerus) are abundant, and often injurious to vegetation. Other species are found in Canada.
A arvensis
Pimpernel Pim"per*nel, n. [F. pimprenelle; cf. Sp. pimpinela, It. pimpinella; perh. from LL. bipinnella, for bipinnula two-winged, equiv. to L. bipennis; bis twice + penna feather, wing. Cf. Pen a feather.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus Anagallis, of which one species (A. arvensis) has small flowers, usually scarlet, but sometimes purple, blue, or white, which speedily close at the approach of bad weather. Water pimpernel. (Bot.) See Brookweed.
A Ascalonium
Rocambole Roc"am*bole, n. [F.] [Written also rokambole.] (Bot.) A name of Allium Scorodoprasum and A. Ascalonium, two kinds of garlic, the latter of which is also called shallot.
A atricapillus
Goshawk Gos"hawk`, n. [AS. g?shafuc, lit., goosehawk; or Icel. g[=a]shaukr. See Goose, and Hawk the bird.] (Zo["o]l.) Any large hawk of the genus Astur, of which many species and varieties are known. The European (Astur palumbarius) and the American (A. atricapillus) are the best known species. They are noted for their powerful flight, activity, and courage. The Australian goshawk (A. Nov[ae]-Hollandi[ae]) is pure white.
A austerus
Vole Vole, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of micelike rodents belonging to Arvicola and allied genera of the subfamily Arvicolin[ae]. They have a thick head, short ears, and a short hairy tail. Note: The water vole, or water rat, of Europe (Arvicola amphibius) is a common large aquatic species. The short-tailed field vole (A. agrestis) of Northern and Central Europe, and Asia, the Southern field vole (A. arvalis), and the Siberian root vole (A. [oe]conomus), are important European species. The common species of the Eastern United States (A. riparius) (called also meadow mouse) and the prairie mouse (A. austerus) are abundant, and often injurious to vegetation. Other species are found in Canada.
A australis
Kivikivi Ki`vi*ki"vi, Kiwikiwi Ki`wi*ki"wi, n.; pl. Kivikivies (?), Kiwikiwies. (Zo["o]l.) Any species of Apteryx, esp. A. australis; -- so called in imitation of its notes. Called also kiwi. See Apteryx.
A balsamifera
Poison Poi"son, n. [F. poison, in Old French also, a potion, fr. L. potio a drink, draught, potion, a poisonous draught, fr. potare to drink. See Potable, and cf. Potion.] 1. Any agent which, when introduced into the animal organism, is capable of producing a morbid, noxious, or deadly effect upon it; as, morphine is a deadly poison; the poison of pestilential diseases. 2. That which taints or destroys moral purity or health; as, the poison of evil example; the poison of sin. Poison ash. (Bot.) (a) A tree of the genus Amyris (A. balsamifera) found in the West Indies, from the trunk of which a black liquor distills, supposed to have poisonous qualities. (b) The poison sumac (Rhus venenata). [U. S.] Poison dogwood (Bot.), poison sumac. Poison fang (Zo["o]l.), one of the superior maxillary teeth of some species of serpents, which, besides having the cavity for the pulp, is either perforated or grooved by a longitudinal canal, at the lower end of which the duct of the poison gland terminates. See Illust. under Fang. Poison gland (Biol.), a gland, in animals or plants, which secretes an acrid or venomous matter, that is conveyed along an organ capable of inflicting a wound. Poison hemlock (Bot.), a poisonous umbelliferous plant (Conium maculatum). See Hemlock. Poison ivy (Bot.), a poisonous climbing plant (Rhus Toxicodendron) of North America. It is common on stone walls and on the trunks of trees, and has trifoliate, rhombic-ovate, variously notched leaves. Many people are poisoned by it, if they touch the leaves. See Poison sumac. Called also poison oak, and mercury. Poison nut. (Bot.) (a) Nux vomica. (b) The tree which yields this seed (Strychnos Nuxvomica). It is found on the Malabar and Coromandel coasts. Poison oak (Bot.), the poison ivy; also, the more shrubby Rhus diversiloba of California and Oregon. Poison sac. (Zo["o]l.) Same as Poison gland, above. See Illust. under Fang. Poison sumac (Bot.), a poisonous shrub of the genus Rhus (R. venenata); -- also called poison ash, poison dogwood, and poison elder. It has pinnate leaves on graceful and slender common petioles, and usually grows in swampy places. Both this plant and the poison ivy (Rhus Toxicodendron) have clusters of smooth greenish white berries, while the red-fruited species of this genus are harmless. The tree (Rhus vernicifera) which yields the celebrated Japan lacquer is almost identical with the poison sumac, and is also very poisonous. The juice of the poison sumac also forms a lacquer similar to that of Japan. Syn: Venom; virus; bane; pest; malignity. Usage: Poison, Venom. Poison usually denotes something received into the system by the mouth, breath, etc. Venom is something discharged from animals and received by means of a wound, as by the bite or sting of serpents, scorpions, etc. Hence, venom specifically implies some malignity of nature or purpose.
A bispinosa
Natal plum Na*tal" plum` (Bot.) The drupaceous fruit of two South African shrubs of the genus Arduina (A. bispinosa and A. grandiflora).
A Canadensis
Shad Shad (sh[a^]d), n. sing. & pl. [AS. sceadda a kind of fish, akin to Prov. G. schade; cf. Ir. & Gael. sgadan a herring, W. ysgadan herrings; all perhaps akin to E. skate a fish.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of food fishes of the Herring family. The American species (Clupea sapidissima), which is abundant on the Atlantic coast and ascends the larger rivers in spring to spawn, is an important market fish. The European allice shad, or alose (C. alosa), and the twaite shad. (C. finta), are less important species. [Written also chad.] Note: The name is loosely applied, also, to several other fishes, as the gizzard shad (see under Gizzard), called also mud shad, white-eyed shad, and winter shad. Hardboaded, or Yellow-tailed, shad, the menhaden. Hickory, or Tailor, shad, the mattowacca. Long-boned shad, one of several species of important food fishes of the Bermudas and the West Indies, of the genus Gerres. Shad bush (Bot.), a name given to the North American shrubs or small trees of the rosaceous genus Amelanchier (A. Canadensis, and A. alnifolia) Their white racemose blossoms open in April or May, when the shad appear, and the edible berries (pomes) ripen in June or July, whence they are called Juneberries. The plant is also called service tree, and Juneberry. Shad frog, an American spotted frog (Rana halecina); -- so called because it usually appears at the time when the shad begin to run in the rivers. Trout shad, the squeteague. White shad, the common shad.
A Canadensis
Columbine Col"um*bine, n. [LL. columbina, L. columbinus dovelike, fr. columba dove: cf. F. colombine. Perh. so called from the beaklike spurs of its flowers.] 1. (Bot.) A plant of several species of the genus Aquilegia; as, A. vulgaris, or the common garden columbine; A. Canadensis, the wild red columbine of North America. 2. The mistress or sweetheart of Harlequin in pantomimes. --Brewer.
A candidissima
Egret E"gret, n. [See Aigret, Heron.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) The name of several species of herons which bear plumes on the back. They are generally white. Among the best known species are the American egret (Ardea, or Herodias, egretta); the great egret (A. alba); the little egret (A. garzetta), of Europe; and the American snowy egret (A. candidissima). A bunch of egrets killed for their plumage. --G. W. Cable. 2. A plume or tuft of feathers worn as a part of a headdress, or anything imitating such an ornament; an aigrette. 3. (Bot.) The flying feathery or hairy crown of seeds or achenes, as the down of the thistle. 4. (Zo["o]l.) A kind of ape.
A Carolinensis
Teal Teal, n. [OE. tele; akin to D. teling a generation, production, teal, telen to breed, produce, and E. till to cultivate. The English word probably once meant, a brood or flock. See Till to cultivate.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small fresh-water ducks of the genus Anas and the subgenera Querquedula and Nettion. The male is handsomely colored, and has a bright green or blue speculum on the wings. Note: The common European teal (Anas crecca) and the European blue-winged teal, or garganey (A. querquedula or A. circia), are well-known species. In America the blue-winged teal (A. discors), the green-winged teal (A. Carolinensis), and the cinnamon teal (A. cynaoptera) are common species, valued as game birds. See Garganey. Goose teal, a goslet. See Goslet. Teal duck, the common European teal.
A closed sea
Close Close, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Closed; p. pr. & vb. n. Closing.] [From OF. & F. clos, p. p. of clore to close, fr. L. claudere; akin to G. schliessen to shut, and to E. clot, cloister, clavicle, conclude, sluice. Cf. Clause, n.] 1. To stop, or fill up, as an opening; to shut; as, to close the eyes; to close a door. 2. To bring together the parts of; to consolidate; as, to close the ranks of an army; -- often used with up. 3. To bring to an end or period; to conclude; to complete; to finish; to end; to consummate; as, to close a bargain; to close a course of instruction. One frugal supper did our studies close. --Dryden. 4. To come or gather around; to inclose; to encompass; to confine. The depth closed me round about. --Jonah ii. 5. But now thou dost thyself immure and close In some one corner of a feeble heart. --Herbert. A closed sea, a sea within the jurisdiction of some particular nation, which controls its navigation.
A collaris
2. (Zo["o]l.) A scaup duck. See below. Scaup duck (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of northern ducks of the genus Aythya, or Fuligula. The adult males are, in large part, black. The three North American species are: the greater scaup duck (Aythya marila, var. nearctica), called also broadbill, bluebill, blackhead, flock duck, flocking fowl, and raft duck; the lesser scaup duck (A. affinis), called also little bluebill, river broadbill, and shuffler; the tufted, or ring-necked, scaup duck (A. collaris), called also black jack, ringneck, ringbill, ringbill shuffler, etc. See Illust.. of Ring-necked duck, under Ring-necked. The common European scaup, or mussel, duck (A. marila), closely resembles the American variety.
a debt wages etc
Scale Scale, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scaled; p. pr. & vb. n. Scaling.] To weigh or measure according to a scale; to measure; also, to grade or vary according to a scale or system. Scaling his present bearing with his past. --Shak. To scale, or scale down, a debt, wages, etc., to reduce a debt, etc., according to a fixed ratio or scale. [U.S.]
A discors
Teal Teal, n. [OE. tele; akin to D. teling a generation, production, teal, telen to breed, produce, and E. till to cultivate. The English word probably once meant, a brood or flock. See Till to cultivate.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of small fresh-water ducks of the genus Anas and the subgenera Querquedula and Nettion. The male is handsomely colored, and has a bright green or blue speculum on the wings. Note: The common European teal (Anas crecca) and the European blue-winged teal, or garganey (A. querquedula or A. circia), are well-known species. In America the blue-winged teal (A. discors), the green-winged teal (A. Carolinensis), and the cinnamon teal (A. cynaoptera) are common species, valued as game birds. See Garganey. Goose teal, a goslet. See Goslet. Teal duck, the common European teal.
A dracunculus
Tarragon Tar"ra*gon, n. [Sp. taragona, Ar. tarkh?n; perhaps fr. Gr. ? a dragon, or L. draco; cf. L. dracunculus tarragon. Cf. Dragon.] (Bot.) A plant of the genus Artemisa (A. dracunculus), much used in France for flavoring vinegar.
A fasciata
Honeybee Hon"ey*bee`, n. (Zo["o]l.) Any bee of the genus Apis, which lives in communities and collects honey, esp. the common domesticated hive bee (Apis mellifica), the Italian bee (A. ligustica), and the Arabiab bee (A. fasciata). The two latter are by many entomologists considered only varieties of the common hive bee. Each swarm of bees consists of a large number of workers (barren females), with, ordinarily, one queen or fertile female, but in the swarming season several young queens, and a number of males or drones, are produced.
A Filixmas
Male Male, a. [F. m[^a]le, OF. masle, mascle, fr. L. masculus male, masculine, dim. of mas a male; possibly akin to E. man. Cf. Masculine, Marry, v. t.] 1. Of or pertaining to the sex that begets or procreates young, or (in a wider sense) to the sex that produces spermatozoa, by which the ova are fertilized; not female; as, male organs. 2. (Bot.) Capable of producing fertilization, but not of bearing fruit; -- said of stamens and antheridia, and of the plants, or parts of plants, which bear them. 3. Suitable to the male sex; characteristic or suggestive of a male; masculine; as, male courage. 4. Consisting of males; as, a male choir. 5. (Mech.) Adapted for entering another corresponding piece (the female piece) which is hollow and which it fits; as, a male gauge, for gauging the size or shape of a hole; a male screw, etc. Male berry (Bot.), a kind of coffee. See Pea berry. Male fern (Bot.), a fern of the genus Aspidium (A. Filixmas), used in medicine as an anthelmintic, esp. against the tapeworm. Aspidium marginale in America, and A. athamanticum in South Africa, are used as good substitutes for the male fern in medical practice. See Female fern, under Female. Male rhyme, a rhyme in which only the last syllables agree, as laid, afraid, dismayed. See Female rhyme, under Female. Male screw (Mech.), a screw having threads upon its exterior which enter the grooves upon the inside of a corresponding nut or female screw. Male thread, the thread of a male screw.
A fluviatilis
Note: The common or sea lamprey of America and Europe (Petromyzon marinus), which in spring ascends rivers to spawn, is considered excellent food by many, and is sold as a market fish in some localities. The smaller river lampreys mostly belong to the genus Ammoc[oe]les, or Lampetra, as A. fluviatilis, of Europe, and A. [ae]pypterus of America. All lampreys attach themselves to other fishes, as parasites, by means of the suckerlike mouth.
A giganteus
Limpkin Limp"kin (l[i^]mp"k[i^]n), n. (Zo["o]l.) Either one of two species of wading birds of the genus Aramus, intermediate between the cranes and rails. The limpkins are remarkable for the great length of the toes. One species (A. giganteus) inhabits Florida and the West Indies; the other (A. scolopaceus) is found in South America. Called also courlan, and crying bird.
a going business
Going Go"ing, p. pr. of Go. Specif.: (a) That goes; in existence; available for present use or enjoyment; current; obtainable; also, moving; working; in operation; departing; as, he is of the brightest men going; going prices or rate. (b) Carrying on its ordinary business; conducting business, or carried on, with an indefinite prospect of continuance; -- chiefly used in the phrases a going business, concern, etc. (c) Of or pert. to a going business or concern; as, the going value of a company.
A great gross
Gross Gross, n. [F. gros (in sense 1), grosse (in sense 2). See Gross, a.] 1. The main body; the chief part, bulk, or mass. ``The gross of the enemy.' --Addison. For the gross of the people, they are considered as a mere herd of cattle. --Burke. 2. sing. & pl. The number of twelve dozen; twelve times twelve; as, a gross of bottles; ten gross of pens. Advowson in gross (Law), an advowson belonging to a person, and not to a manor. A great gross, twelve gross; one hundred and forty-four dozen. By the gross, by the quantity; at wholesale. Common in gross. (Law) See under Common, n. In the gross, In gross, in the bulk, or the undivided whole; all parts taken together.
A guttatus
Stargaser Star"gas`er, n. 1. One who gazes at the stars; an astrologer; sometimes, in derision or contempt, an astronomer. 2. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of spiny-rayed marine fishes belonging to Uranoscopus, Astroscopus, and allied genera, of the family Uranoscopid[ae]. The common species of the Eastern United States are Astroscopus anoplus, and A. guttatus. So called from the position of the eyes, which look directly upward.

Meaning of S from wikipedia

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