Definition of Per . Meaning of Per . Synonyms of Per

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Definition of Per

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A per se
A A (named [=a] in the English, and most commonly ["a] in other languages). The first letter of the English and of many other alphabets. The capital A of the alphabets of Middle and Western Europe, as also the small letter (a), besides the forms in Italic, black letter, etc., are all descended from the old Latin A, which was borrowed from the Greek Alpha, of the same form; and this was made from the first letter (?) of the Ph[oe]nician alphabet, the equivalent of the Hebrew Aleph, and itself from the Egyptian origin. The Aleph was a consonant letter, with a guttural breath sound that was not an element of Greek articulation; and the Greeks took it to represent their vowel Alpha with the ["a] sound, the Ph[oe]nician alphabet having no vowel symbols. This letter, in English, is used for several different vowel sounds. See Guide to pronunciation, [sect][sect] 43-74. The regular long a, as in fate, etc., is a comparatively modern sound, and has taken the place of what, till about the early part of the 17th century, was a sound of the quality of ["a] (as in far). 2. (Mus.) The name of the sixth tone in the model major scale (that in C), or the first tone of the minor scale, which is named after it the scale in A minor. The second string of the violin is tuned to the A in the treble staff. -- A sharp (A[sharp]) is the name of a musical tone intermediate between A and B. -- A flat (A[flat]) is the name of a tone intermediate between A and G. A per se (L. per se by itself), one pre["e]minent; a nonesuch. [Obs.] O fair Creseide, the flower and A per se Of Troy and Greece. --Chaucer.
Caliper compasses
Compasses Com"pass*es, n., pl. An instrument for describing circles, measuring figures, etc., consisting of two, or (rarely) more, pointed branches, or legs, usually joined at the top by a rivet on which they move. Note: The compasses for drawing circles have adjustable pen points, pencil points, etc.; those used for measuring without adjustable points are generally called dividers. See Dividers. Bow compasses. See Bow-compass. Caliber compasses, Caliper compasses. See Calipers. Proportional, Triangular, etc., compasses. See under Proportional, etc.
caliper or gauge
Micrometer Mi*crom"e*ter, n. [Micro- + -meter: cf. F. microm[`e]tre.] An instrument, used with a telescope or microscope, for measuring minute distances, or the apparent diameters of objects which subtend minute angles. The measurement given directly is that of the image of the object formed at the focus of the object glass. Circular, or Ring, micrometer, a metallic ring fixed in the focus of the object glass of a telescope, and used to determine differences of right ascension and declination between stars by observations of the times at which the stars cross the inner or outer periphery of the ring. Double image micrometer, a micrometer in which two images of an object are formed in the field, usually by the two halves of a bisected lens which are movable along their line of section by a screw, and distances are determined by the number of screw revolutions necessary to bring the points to be measured into optical coincidence. When the two images are formed by a bisected object glass, it is called a divided-object-glass micrometer, and when the instrument is large and equatorially mounted, it is known as a heliometer. Double refraction micrometer, a species of double image micrometer, in which the two images are formed by the double refraction of rock crystal. Filar, or Bifilar, micrometer. See under Bifilar. Micrometer caliper or gauge (Mech.), a caliper or gauge with a micrometer screw, for measuring dimensions with great accuracy. Micrometer head, the head of a micrometer screw. Micrometer microscope, a compound microscope combined with a filar micrometer, used chiefly for reading and subdividing the divisions of large astronomical and geodetical instruments. Micrometer screw, a screw with a graduated head used in some forms of micrometers. Position micrometer. See under Position. Scale, or Linear, micrometer, a minute and very delicately graduated scale of equal parts used in the field of a telescope or microscope, for measuring distances by direct comparison.
caper bush
Caper Ca"per, n. [F. c[^a]pre, fr. L. capparis, Gr. ?; cf. Ar. & Per. al-kabar.] 1. The pungent grayish green flower bud of the European and Oriental caper (Capparis spinosa), much used for pickles. 2. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Capparis; -- called also caper bush, caper tree. Note: The Capparis spinosa is a low prickly shrub of the Mediterranean coasts, with trailing branches and brilliant flowers; -- cultivated in the south of Europe for its buds. The C. sodada is an almost leafless spiny shrub of central Africa (Soudan), Arabia, and southern India, with edible berries. Bean caper. See Bran caper, in the Vocabulary. Caper sauce, a kind of sauce or catchup made of capers.
Caper bush
Caper bush Ca"per bush`, Caper tree Ca"per tree` See Capper, a plant, 2.
Caper sauce
Caper Ca"per, n. [F. c[^a]pre, fr. L. capparis, Gr. ?; cf. Ar. & Per. al-kabar.] 1. The pungent grayish green flower bud of the European and Oriental caper (Capparis spinosa), much used for pickles. 2. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Capparis; -- called also caper bush, caper tree. Note: The Capparis spinosa is a low prickly shrub of the Mediterranean coasts, with trailing branches and brilliant flowers; -- cultivated in the south of Europe for its buds. The C. sodada is an almost leafless spiny shrub of central Africa (Soudan), Arabia, and southern India, with edible berries. Bean caper. See Bran caper, in the Vocabulary. Caper sauce, a kind of sauce or catchup made of capers.
caper tree
Caper Ca"per, n. [F. c[^a]pre, fr. L. capparis, Gr. ?; cf. Ar. & Per. al-kabar.] 1. The pungent grayish green flower bud of the European and Oriental caper (Capparis spinosa), much used for pickles. 2. (Bot.) A plant of the genus Capparis; -- called also caper bush, caper tree. Note: The Capparis spinosa is a low prickly shrub of the Mediterranean coasts, with trailing branches and brilliant flowers; -- cultivated in the south of Europe for its buds. The C. sodada is an almost leafless spiny shrub of central Africa (Soudan), Arabia, and southern India, with edible berries. Bean caper. See Bran caper, in the Vocabulary. Caper sauce, a kind of sauce or catchup made of capers.
Caper tree
Caper bush Ca"per bush`, Caper tree Ca"per tree` See Capper, a plant, 2.
Clapper rail
Clapper Clap"per, n. 1. A person who claps. 2. That which strikes or claps, as the tongue of a bell, or the piece of wood that strikes a mill hopper, etc. See Illust. of Bell. Clapper rail (Zo["o]l.), an Americam species of rail (Rallus scepitans).
Cooper beech
Beech Beech, n.; pl. Beeches. [OE. beche, AS. b?ce; akin to D. beuk, OHG. buocha, G. buche, Icel. beyki, Dan. b["o]g, Sw. bok, Russ. buk, L. fagus, Gr. ? oak, ? to eat, Skr. bhaksh; the tree being named originally from the esculent fruit. See Book, and cf. 7th Buck, Buckwheat.] (Bot.) A tree of the genus Fagus. Note: It grows to a large size, having a smooth bark and thick foliage, and bears an edible triangular nut, of which swine are fond. The Fagus sylvatica is the European species, and the F. ferruginea that of America. Beech drops (Bot.), a parasitic plant which grows on the roots of beeches (Epiphegus Americana). Beech marten (Zo["o]l.), the stone marten of Europe (Mustela foina). Beech mast, the nuts of the beech, esp. as they lie under the trees, in autumn. Beech oil, oil expressed from the mast or nuts of the beech tree. Cooper beech, a variety of the European beech with copper-colored, shining leaves.
Copper barilla
Barilla Ba*ril"la (b[.a]*r[i^]l"l[.a]), n. [Sp. barrilla.] 1. (Bot.) A name given to several species of Salsola from which soda is made, by burning the barilla in heaps and lixiviating the ashes. 2. (Com.) (a) The alkali produced from the plant, being an impure carbonate of soda, used for making soap, glass, etc., and for bleaching purposes. (b) Impure soda obtained from the ashes of any seashore plant, or kelp. --Ure. Copper barilla (Min.), native copper in granular form mixed with sand, an ore brought from Bolivia; -- called also Barilla de cobre.
Copper finch
Finch Finch, n.; pl. Fishes. [AS. finc; akin to D. vink, OHG. fincho, G. fink; cf. W. pinc a finch; also E. spink.] (Zo["o]l.) A small singing bird of many genera and species, belonging to the family Fringillid[ae]. Note: The word is often used in composition, as in chaffinch, goldfinch, grassfinch, pinefinch, etc. Bramble finch. See Brambling. Canary finch, the canary bird. Copper finch. See Chaffinch. Diamond finch. See under Diamond. Finch falcon (Zo["o]l.), one of several very small East Indian falcons of the genus Hierax. To pull a finch, to swindle an ignorant or unsuspecting person. [Obs.] ``Privily a finch eke could he pull.' --Chaucer.
copper finch
Chaffinch Chaf"finch, n. [Cf. Chiff-chaff.] (Zo["o]l.) A bird of Europe (Fringilla c[oe]lebs), having a variety of very sweet songs, and highly valued as a cage bird; -- called also copper finch.
copper glance
Chalcocite Chal"co*cite, n. [Gr. chalko`s brass.] (Min.) Native copper sulphide, called also copper glance, and vitreous copper; a mineral of a black color and metallic luster. [Formerly written chalcosine.]
copper uranite
Torbernite Tor"bern*ite, n. [So named after Torber Bergmann, a Swedish chemist.] (Min.) A mineral occurring in emerald-green tabular crystals having a micaceous structure. It is a hydrous phosphate of uranium and copper. Called also copper uranite, and chalcolite.
Copper works
Copper works Cop"per works` A place where copper is wrought or manufactured. --Woodward.
Ethiops per se
Ethiops E"thi*ops . [NL. See Ethiop.] (Old Chem.) A black substance; -- formerly applied to various preparations of a black or very dark color. [Written also [AE]thiops.] [Obs.] Ethiops martial (Old Chem.), black oxide of iron. Ethiops mineral (Old Chem.), black sulphide of mercury, obtained by triturating mercury with sulphur. Ethiops per se (Old Chem.), mercury in finely divided state, having the appearance of a dark powder, obtained by shaking it up or by exposure to the air.
Flapper skate
Flapper Flap"per, n. 1. One who, or that which, flaps. 2. See Flipper. ``The flapper of a porpoise.' --Buckley. Flapper skate (Zo["o]l.), a European skate (Raia intermedia).
Galloper gun
Galloper Gal"lop*er, n. 1. One who, or that which, gallops. 2. (Mil.) A carriage on which very small guns were formerly mounted, the gun resting on the shafts, without a limber. --Farrow. Galloper gun, a light gun, supported on a galloper, -- formerly attached to British infantry regiments.
gaper clam
Gaper Gap"er, n. 1. One who gapes. 2. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A European fish. See 4th Comber. (b) A large edible clam (Schizoth[ae]rus Nuttalli), of the Pacific coast; -- called also gaper clam. (c) An East Indian bird of the genus Cymbirhynchus, related to the broadbills.
Grasshopper engine
Note: The meadow or green grasshoppers belong to the Locustid[ae]. They have long antenn[ae], large ovipositors, and stridulating organs at the base of the wings in the male. The European great green grasshopper (Locusta viridissima) belongs to this family. The common American green species mostly belong to Xiphidium, Orchelimum, and Conocephalus. 2. In ordinary square or upright pianos of London make, the escapement lever or jack, so made that it can be taken out and replaced with the key; -- called also the hopper. --Grove. Grasshopper engine, a steam engine having a working beam with its fulcrum at one end, the steam cylinder at the other end, and the connecting rod at an intermediate point. Grasshopper lobster (Zo["o]l.) a young lobster. [Local, U. S.] Grasshopper warbler (Zo["o]l.), cricket bird.
Grasshopper lobster
Note: The meadow or green grasshoppers belong to the Locustid[ae]. They have long antenn[ae], large ovipositors, and stridulating organs at the base of the wings in the male. The European great green grasshopper (Locusta viridissima) belongs to this family. The common American green species mostly belong to Xiphidium, Orchelimum, and Conocephalus. 2. In ordinary square or upright pianos of London make, the escapement lever or jack, so made that it can be taken out and replaced with the key; -- called also the hopper. --Grove. Grasshopper engine, a steam engine having a working beam with its fulcrum at one end, the steam cylinder at the other end, and the connecting rod at an intermediate point. Grasshopper lobster (Zo["o]l.) a young lobster. [Local, U. S.] Grasshopper warbler (Zo["o]l.), cricket bird.
Grasshopper warbler
Note: The meadow or green grasshoppers belong to the Locustid[ae]. They have long antenn[ae], large ovipositors, and stridulating organs at the base of the wings in the male. The European great green grasshopper (Locusta viridissima) belongs to this family. The common American green species mostly belong to Xiphidium, Orchelimum, and Conocephalus. 2. In ordinary square or upright pianos of London make, the escapement lever or jack, so made that it can be taken out and replaced with the key; -- called also the hopper. --Grove. Grasshopper engine, a steam engine having a working beam with its fulcrum at one end, the steam cylinder at the other end, and the connecting rod at an intermediate point. Grasshopper lobster (Zo["o]l.) a young lobster. [Local, U. S.] Grasshopper warbler (Zo["o]l.), cricket bird.
grasshopper warbler
Cricket Crick"et (kr?k"?t), n. [OE. criket, OF. crequet, criquet; prob. of German origin, and akin to E. creak; cf. D. kriek a cricket. See Creak.] (Zo["o]l.) An orthopterous insect of the genus Gryllus, and allied genera. The males make chirping, musical notes by rubbing together the basal parts of the veins of the front wings. Note: The common European cricket is Gryllus domesticus; the common large black crickets of America are G. niger, G. neglectus, and others. Balm cricket. See under Balm. Cricket bird, a small European bird (Silvia locustella); -- called also grasshopper warbler. Cricket frog, a small American tree frog (Acris gryllus); -- so called from its chirping.
gray copper ore
Tetrahedrite Tet`ra*he"drite, n. [So called because the crystals of the species are commonly tetrahedrons.] (Min.) A sulphide of antimony and copper, with small quantities of other metals. It is a very common ore of copper, and some varieties yield a considerable presentage of silver. Called also gray copper ore, fahlore, and panabase.
Hanaper office
Hanaper Han"a*per, n. [LL. hanaperium a large vase, fr. hanaus vase, bowl, cup (whence F. hanap); of German origin; cf. ONG. hnapf, G. napf, akin to AS. hn[ae]p cup, bowl. Cf. Hamper, Nappy, n.] A kind of basket, usually of wickerwork, and adapted for the packing and carrying of articles; a hamper. Hanaper office, an office of the English court of chancery in which writs relating to the business of the public, and the returns to them, were anciently kept in a hanaper or hamper. --Blackstone.
hooper swan
Hooper Hoop"er, n. (Zo["o]l.) [So called from its note.] The European whistling, or wild, swan (Olor cygnus); -- called also hooper swan, whooping swan, and elk.
Hopper boy
Hopper Hop"per, n. [See 1st Hop.] 1. One who, or that which, hops. 2. A chute, box, or receptacle, usually funnel-shaped with an opening at the lower part, for delivering or feeding any material, as to a machine; as, the wooden box with its trough through which grain passes into a mill by joining or shaking, or a funnel through which fuel passes into a furnace, or coal, etc., into a car. 3. (Mus.) See Grasshopper, 2. 4. pl. A game. See Hopscotch. --Johnson. 5. (Zo["o]l.) (a) See Grasshopper, and Frog hopper, Grape hopper, Leaf hopper, Tree hopper, under Frog, Grape, Leaf, and Tree. (b) The larva of a cheese fly. 6. (Naut.) A vessel for carrying waste, garbage, etc., out to sea, so constructed as to discharge its load by a mechanical contrivance; -- called also dumping scow. Bell and hopper (Metal.), the apparatus at the top of a blast furnace, through which the charge is introduced, while the gases are retained. Hopper boy, a rake in a mill, moving in a circle to spread meal for drying, and to draw it over an opening in the floor, through which it falls. Hopper closet, a water-closet, without a movable pan, in which the receptacle is a funnel standing on a draintrap. Hopper cock, a faucet or valve for flushing the hopper of a water-closet.
Hopper closet
Hopper Hop"per, n. [See 1st Hop.] 1. One who, or that which, hops. 2. A chute, box, or receptacle, usually funnel-shaped with an opening at the lower part, for delivering or feeding any material, as to a machine; as, the wooden box with its trough through which grain passes into a mill by joining or shaking, or a funnel through which fuel passes into a furnace, or coal, etc., into a car. 3. (Mus.) See Grasshopper, 2. 4. pl. A game. See Hopscotch. --Johnson. 5. (Zo["o]l.) (a) See Grasshopper, and Frog hopper, Grape hopper, Leaf hopper, Tree hopper, under Frog, Grape, Leaf, and Tree. (b) The larva of a cheese fly. 6. (Naut.) A vessel for carrying waste, garbage, etc., out to sea, so constructed as to discharge its load by a mechanical contrivance; -- called also dumping scow. Bell and hopper (Metal.), the apparatus at the top of a blast furnace, through which the charge is introduced, while the gases are retained. Hopper boy, a rake in a mill, moving in a circle to spread meal for drying, and to draw it over an opening in the floor, through which it falls. Hopper closet, a water-closet, without a movable pan, in which the receptacle is a funnel standing on a draintrap. Hopper cock, a faucet or valve for flushing the hopper of a water-closet.
Hopper cock
Hopper Hop"per, n. [See 1st Hop.] 1. One who, or that which, hops. 2. A chute, box, or receptacle, usually funnel-shaped with an opening at the lower part, for delivering or feeding any material, as to a machine; as, the wooden box with its trough through which grain passes into a mill by joining or shaking, or a funnel through which fuel passes into a furnace, or coal, etc., into a car. 3. (Mus.) See Grasshopper, 2. 4. pl. A game. See Hopscotch. --Johnson. 5. (Zo["o]l.) (a) See Grasshopper, and Frog hopper, Grape hopper, Leaf hopper, Tree hopper, under Frog, Grape, Leaf, and Tree. (b) The larva of a cheese fly. 6. (Naut.) A vessel for carrying waste, garbage, etc., out to sea, so constructed as to discharge its load by a mechanical contrivance; -- called also dumping scow. Bell and hopper (Metal.), the apparatus at the top of a blast furnace, through which the charge is introduced, while the gases are retained. Hopper boy, a rake in a mill, moving in a circle to spread meal for drying, and to draw it over an opening in the floor, through which it falls. Hopper closet, a water-closet, without a movable pan, in which the receptacle is a funnel standing on a draintrap. Hopper cock, a faucet or valve for flushing the hopper of a water-closet.

Meaning of Per from wikipedia

- Per is a Latin preposition which means "through" or "for each", as in per capita. Per or PER may also refer to: Places IOC country code for Peru IATA code...
- per capita does not, however, reflect differences in the cost of living and the inflation rates of the countries; therefore using a basis of GDP per capita...
- Per capita is a Latin prepositional phrase: per (preposition, taking the accusative case, meaning "by means of") and capita (accusative plural of the...
- A per mille (from Latin per mīlle, "in each thousand"), also spelled per mil, per mill, permil, permill, or permille is a sign indicating parts per thousand...
- to their per capita GDP. These include: List of countries by GDP (nominal) per capita – GDP at market or government official exchange rates per inhabitant...
- alphabetical list of countries by past and ****ure gross domestic product per capita, based on official exchange rates, not on the purchasing power parity...
- data blocks per unit time p****ing through a communication link in a data-transmission system. Common data rate units are multiples of bits per second (bit/s)...
- Per stirpes (/pɜːr ˈstɜːrpiːz/; "by branch") is a legal term from Latin. An estate of a decedent is distributed per stirpes if each branch of the family...
- agriculture: standing stock and standing crop) is a measurement of po****tion per unit area or unit volume; it is a quantity of type number density. It is...
- In science and engineering, the parts-per notation is a set of pseudo-units to describe small values of miscellaneous dimensionless quantities, e.g. mole...
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