Definition of Scale. Meaning of Scale. Synonyms of Scale

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Scale. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Scale and, of course, Scale synonyms and on the right images related to the word Scale.

Definition of Scale

Scale
Micrometer Mi*crom"e*ter, n. [Micro- + -meter: cf. F. microm[`e]tre.] An instrument, used with a telescope or microscope, for measuring minute distances, or the apparent diameters of objects which subtend minute angles. The measurement given directly is that of the image of the object formed at the focus of the object glass. Circular, or Ring, micrometer, a metallic ring fixed in the focus of the object glass of a telescope, and used to determine differences of right ascension and declination between stars by observations of the times at which the stars cross the inner or outer periphery of the ring. Double image micrometer, a micrometer in which two images of an object are formed in the field, usually by the two halves of a bisected lens which are movable along their line of section by a screw, and distances are determined by the number of screw revolutions necessary to bring the points to be measured into optical coincidence. When the two images are formed by a bisected object glass, it is called a divided-object-glass micrometer, and when the instrument is large and equatorially mounted, it is known as a heliometer. Double refraction micrometer, a species of double image micrometer, in which the two images are formed by the double refraction of rock crystal. Filar, or Bifilar, micrometer. See under Bifilar. Micrometer caliper or gauge (Mech.), a caliper or gauge with a micrometer screw, for measuring dimensions with great accuracy. Micrometer head, the head of a micrometer screw. Micrometer microscope, a compound microscope combined with a filar micrometer, used chiefly for reading and subdividing the divisions of large astronomical and geodetical instruments. Micrometer screw, a screw with a graduated head used in some forms of micrometers. Position micrometer. See under Position. Scale, or Linear, micrometer, a minute and very delicately graduated scale of equal parts used in the field of a telescope or microscope, for measuring distances by direct comparison.
Scale
Scale Scale, v. t. 1. To strip or clear of scale or scales; as, to scale a fish; to scale the inside of a boiler. 2. To take off in thin layers or scales, as tartar from the teeth; to pare off, as a surface. ``If all the mountains were scaled, and the earth made even.' --T. Burnet. 3. To scatter; to spread. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.] 4. (Gun.) To clean, as the inside of a cannon, by the explosion of a small quantity of powder. --Totten.
Scale
Scale Scale (sk[=a]l), n. [AS. sc[=a]le; perhaps influenced by the kindred Icel. sk[=a]l balance, dish, akin also to D. schaal a scale, bowl, shell, G. schale, OHG. sc[=a]la, Dan. skaal drinking cup, bowl, dish, and perh. to E. scale of a fish. Cf. Scale of a fish, Skull the brain case.] 1. The dish of a balance; hence, the balance itself; an instrument or machine for weighing; as, to turn the scale; -- chiefly used in the plural when applied to the whole instrument or apparatus for weighing. Also used figuratively. Long time in even scale The battle hung. --Milton. The scales are turned; her kindness weighs no more Now than my vows. --Waller. 2. pl. (Astron.) The sign or constellation Libra. Platform scale. See under Platform.
Scale
Scale Scale, v. i. 1. To separate and come off in thin layers or lamin[ae]; as, some sandstone scales by exposure. Those that cast their shell are the lobster and crab; the old skins are found, but the old shells never; so it is likely that they scale off. --Bacon. 2. To separate; to scatter. [Scot. & Prov. Eng.]
Scale
Scale Scale, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Scaled; p. pr. & vb. n. Scaling.] To weigh or measure according to a scale; to measure; also, to grade or vary according to a scale or system. Scaling his present bearing with his past. --Shak. To scale, or scale down, a debt, wages, etc., to reduce a debt, etc., according to a fixed ratio or scale. [U.S.]
Scale
Scale Scale, v. t. [Cf. It. scalare, fr. L. scalae, scala. See Scale a ladder.] To climb by a ladder, or as if by a ladder; to ascend by steps or by climbing; to clamber up; as, to scale the wall of a fort. Oft have I scaled the craggy oak. --Spenser.
Scale
Scale Scale, v. i. To lead up by steps; to ascend. [Obs.] Satan from hence, now on the lower stair, That scaled by steps of gold to heaven-gate, Looks down with wonder. --Milton.

Meaning of Scale from wikipedia

- Scale or scales may refer to: Scale (anatomy), a rigid plate which grows out of the skin of various animals Scale (dermatology), a secondary skin lesion...
- Scalability is the capability of a system, network, or process to handle a growing amount of work, or its potential to be enlarged to accommodate that...
- A weighing scale (or weighing balance) is devices to measure weight or m****. They are also known as m**** scales, weight scales, m**** balance, weight balance...
- The Scoville scale is a measurement of the pungency (****iness/heat) of chili peppers and other ****y foods, as recorded in Scoville Heat Units (SHU)...
- The in scale (also known as the Sakura pentatonic scale due to its use in the well-known folk song Sakura Sakura) is, according to a traditional theory...
- Scaling may refer to: In mathematics and physics: Scaling (geometry), a linear transformation that enlarges or diminishes objects Scaling law, a law that...
- The Kardashev scale is a method of measuring a civilization's level of technological advancement based on the amount of energy a civilization is able...
- The Beaufort scale /ˈboʊfərt/ is an empirical measure that relates wind speed to observed conditions at sea or on land. Its full name is the Beaufort...
- The Southern California Linux Expo (SCALE) is an annual Linux, open source and free software conference held in Los Angeles, California, since 2002. Despite...
- scale is any set of musical notes ordered by fundamental frequency or pitch. A scale ordered by increasing pitch is an ascending scale, and a scale ordered...
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