Definition of Jacob. Meaning of Jacob. Synonyms of Jacob

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Jacob. Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Jacob and, of course, Jacob synonyms and on the right images related to the word Jacob.

Definition of Jacob

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Jacobaean lily
Jacobaean lily Jac`o*b[ae]"an lil"y [See Jacobean.] (Bot.) A bulbous plant (Amaryllis, or Sprekelia, formosissima) from Mexico. It bears a single, large, deep, red, lilylike flower. [Written also Jacobean.]
Jacobean
Jacobaean lily Jac`o*b[ae]"an lil"y [See Jacobean.] (Bot.) A bulbous plant (Amaryllis, or Sprekelia, formosissima) from Mexico. It bears a single, large, deep, red, lilylike flower. [Written also Jacobean.]
Jacobean
Jacobean Ja*co"be*an (?; 277), Jacobian Ja*co"bi*an, a. [From L. Jacobus James. See 2d Jack.] Of or pertaining to a style of architecture and decoration in the time of James the First, of England. ``A Jacobean table.' --C. L. Eastlake.
Jacobian
Jacobean Ja*co"be*an (?; 277), Jacobian Ja*co"bi*an, a. [From L. Jacobus James. See 2d Jack.] Of or pertaining to a style of architecture and decoration in the time of James the First, of England. ``A Jacobean table.' --C. L. Eastlake.
Jacobin
Jacobin Jac"o*bin, a. Same as Jacobinic.
Jacobin
Jacobin Jac"o*bin, n. [F. See 2d Jack, Jacobite.] 1. (Eccl. Hist.) A Dominican friar; -- so named because, before the French Revolution, that order had a convent in the Rue St. Jacques, Paris. 2. One of a society of violent agitators in France, during the revolution of 1789, who held secret meetings in the Jacobin convent in the Rue St. Jacques, Paris, and concerted measures to control the proceedings of the National Assembly. Hence: A plotter against an existing government; a turbulent demagogue. 3. (Zo["o]l.) A fancy pigeon, in which the feathers of the neck form a hood, -- whence the name. The wings and tail are long, and the beak moderately short.
Jacobin
Black friar Black" fri`ar (Eccl.) A friar of the Dominican order; -- called also predicant and preaching friar; in France, Jacobin. Also, sometimes, a Benedictine.
Jacobine
Jacobine Jac"o*bine, n. A Jacobin.
Jacobinic
Jacobinic Jac`o*bin"ic, Jacobinical Jac`o*bin"ic*al, a. Of or pertaining to the Jacobins of France; revolutionary; of the nature of, or characterized by, Jacobinism. --Burke. -- Jac`o*bin"ic*al*ly, adv.
Jacobinical
Jacobinic Jac`o*bin"ic, Jacobinical Jac`o*bin"ic*al, a. Of or pertaining to the Jacobins of France; revolutionary; of the nature of, or characterized by, Jacobinism. --Burke. -- Jac`o*bin"ic*al*ly, adv.
Jacobinically
Jacobinic Jac`o*bin"ic, Jacobinical Jac`o*bin"ic*al, a. Of or pertaining to the Jacobins of France; revolutionary; of the nature of, or characterized by, Jacobinism. --Burke. -- Jac`o*bin"ic*al*ly, adv.
Jacobinize
Jacobinize Jac"o*bin*ize`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Jacobinized; p. pr. & vb. n. Jacobinizing.] [Cf. F. Jacobiniser.] To taint with, or convert to, Jacobinism. France was not then jacobinized. --Burke.
Jacobinized
Jacobinize Jac"o*bin*ize`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Jacobinized; p. pr. & vb. n. Jacobinizing.] [Cf. F. Jacobiniser.] To taint with, or convert to, Jacobinism. France was not then jacobinized. --Burke.
Jacobinizing
Jacobinize Jac"o*bin*ize`, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Jacobinized; p. pr. & vb. n. Jacobinizing.] [Cf. F. Jacobiniser.] To taint with, or convert to, Jacobinism. France was not then jacobinized. --Burke.
Jacobins
Dominican Do*min"i*can, n. (Eccl. Hist.) One of an order of mendicant monks founded by Dominic de Guzman, in 1215. A province of the order was established in England in 1221. The first foundation in the United States was made in 1807. The Master of the Sacred Palace at Rome is always a Dominican friar. The Dominicans are called also preaching friars, friars preachers, black friars (from their black cloak), brothers of St. Mary, and in France, Jacobins.
Jacobite
Jacobite Jac"o*bite, n. [L. Jacobus James: cf. F. Jacobite. See 2d Jack.] 1. (Eng. Hist.) A partisan or adherent of James the Second, after his abdication, or of his descendants, an opposer of the revolution in 1688 in favor of William and Mary. --Macaulay. 2. (Eccl.) One of the sect of Syrian Monophysites. The sect is named after Jacob Barad[ae]us, its leader in the sixth century.
Jacobite
Jacobite Jac"o*bite, a. Of or pertaining to the Jacobites.
Jacobitic
Jacobitic Jac`o*bit"ic, Jacobitical Jac`o*bit"ic*al, a. Of or pertaining to the Jacobites; characterized by Jacobitism. -- Jac`o*bit"ic*al*ly, adv.
Jacobitical
Jacobitic Jac`o*bit"ic, Jacobitical Jac`o*bit"ic*al, a. Of or pertaining to the Jacobites; characterized by Jacobitism. -- Jac`o*bit"ic*al*ly, adv.
Jacobitically
Jacobitic Jac`o*bit"ic, Jacobitical Jac`o*bit"ic*al, a. Of or pertaining to the Jacobites; characterized by Jacobitism. -- Jac`o*bit"ic*al*ly, adv.
Jacobitism
Jacobitism Jac"o*bit*ism`, n. The principles of the Jacobites. --Mason.
Jacobus
Jacobus Ja*co"bus, n.; pl. Jacobuses. [See Jacobite.] An English gold coin, of the value of twenty-five shillings sterling, struck in the reign of James I.
Jacobuses
Jacobus Ja*co"bus, n.; pl. Jacobuses. [See Jacobite.] An English gold coin, of the value of twenty-five shillings sterling, struck in the reign of James I.
Senecio Jacobaea
Staggerwort Stag"ger*wort`, n. (Bot.) A kind of ragwort (Senecio Jacob[ae]a).
Vola Jacobaeus
Scallop Scal"lop (?; 277), n. [OF. escalope a shell, probably of German or Dutch origin, and akin to E. scale of a fish; cf. D. schelp shell. See Scale of a fish, and cf. Escalop.] [Written also scollop.] 1. (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of marine bivalve mollusks of the genus Pecten and allied genera of the family Pectinid[ae]. The shell is usually radially ribbed, and the edge is therefore often undulated in a characteristic manner. The large adductor muscle of some the species is much used as food. One species (Vola Jacob[ae]us) occurs on the coast of Palestine, and its shell was formerly worn by pilgrims as a mark that they had been to the Holy Land. Called also fan shell. See Pecten, 2. Note: The common edible scallop of the Eastern United States is Pecten irradians; the large sea scallop, also used as food, is P. Clintonius, or tenuicostatus. 2. One of series of segments of circles joined at their extremities, forming a border like the edge or surface of a scallop shell. 3. One of the shells of a scallop; also, a dish resembling a scallop shell.

Meaning of Jacob from wikipedia

- Jacob (/ˈdʒeɪkəb/; Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב, Modern: Ya‘aqōv (help·info), Tiberian: Yaʿăqōḇ; Arabic: يَعْقُوب‎ yaʿqūb, Gr****: Ἰακώβ, Iakṓb), later given the name...
- The Jacob is a British breed of domestic sheep. It combines two characteristics unusual in sheep: it is piebald—dark-coloured with areas of white wool—and...
- Jacob William Rees-Mogg (born 24 May 1969) is a British politician serving as Leader of the House of Commons and Lord President of the Council since 2019...
- Isḥāq ibn Ibrāhīm يَعْقُوب إِبْنُ إِسْحَٰق إِبْنُ إِبرَٰهِم (literal: "Jacob, son of Isaac, son of Abraham" Arabic: يَعْقُوب‎, romanized: Yaʿqūb; also...
- Jacob Tremblay (/ˈtrɒmbleɪ/; French: [tʁɑ̃blɛ]; born October 5, 2006) is a Canadian actor. His breakout performance was his starring role as Jack Newsome...
- Jacobus Albertus Michael Jacobs, known as Jacob Jacobs (19 May 1812, Antwerp – 9 December 1879, Antwerp) was a Belgian landscape and seascape painter...
- Jacob & Co., sometimes referred to as "Jacob And Co" or "Jacob And Company," is a privately held jewelry and wris****ch retailer, founded in 1986 by diamond...
- Jacob Elordi (born 26 June 1997) is an Australian actor. He pla**** the role of Noah Flynn in The Kissing Booth. In 2019, Elordi began playing Nate Jacobs...
- Jacob Jacobs may refer to: Jacob Jacobs (artist) (1812–1879), Belgian landscape and orientalist painter Jacob Jacobs (theater) (1890–1977), Hungarian-born...
- Jacob Arabo (born 1964) is a Bukharian-American jeweler and founder of Jacob & Company. Jacob Arabo (born Yakov Arabov) was born to a Bukharian Jewish...
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