Definition of Hydrostatic paradox. Meaning of Hydrostatic paradox. Synonyms of Hydrostatic paradox

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Definition of Hydrostatic paradox

Hydrostatic paradox
Paradox Par`a*dox, n.; pl. Paradoxes. [F. paradoxe, L. paradoxum, fr. Gr. ?; ? beside, beyond, contrary to + ? to think, suppose, imagine. See Para-, and Dogma.] A tenet or proposition contrary to received opinion; an assertion or sentiment seemingly contradictory, or opposed to common sense; that which in appearance or terms is absurd, but yet may be true in fact. A gloss there is to color that paradox, and make it appear in show not to be altogether unreasonable. --Hooker. This was sometime a paradox, but now the time gives it proof. --Shak. Hydrostatic paradox. See under Hydrostatic.
Hydrostatic paradox
Hydrostatic Hy`dro*stat"ic, Hydrostatical Hy`dro*stat"ic*al, a. [Hydro-, 1 + Gr. ? causing to stand: cf. F. hydrostatique. See Static.] Of or relating to hydrostatics; pertaining to, or in accordance with, the principles of the equilibrium of fluids. The first discovery made in hydrostatics since the time of Archimedes is due to Stevinus. --Hallam. Hydrostatic balance, a balance for weighing substances in water, for the purpose of ascertaining their specific gravities. Hydrostatic bed, a water bed. Hydrostatic bellows, an apparatus consisting of a water-tight bellowslike case with a long, upright tube, into which water may be poured to illustrate the hydrostatic paradox. Hydrostatic paradox, the proposition in hydrostatics that any quantity of water, however small, may be made to counterbalance any weight, however great; or the law of the equality of pressure of fluids in all directions. Hydrostatic press, a machine in which great force, with slow motion, is communicated to a large plunger by means of water forced into the cylinder in which it moves, by a forcing pump of small diameter, to which the power is applied, the principle involved being the same as in the hydrostatic bellows. Also called hydraulic press, and Bramah press. In the illustration, a is a pump with a small plunger b, which forces the water into the cylinder c, thus driving upward the large plunder d, which performs the reduced work, such as compressing cotton bales, etc.

Meaning of Hydrostatic paradox from wikipedia

- as the hydrostatic paradox." Hydraulic machinery employs this phenomenon to multiply force or torque. Demonstrations of the hydrostatic paradox are used...
- when submerged in a tank and made to suck in the surrounding fluid? Hydrostatic paradox: A m****ive battleship can float in a few litres of water. Norton's...
- physics textbooks. Pascal's contributions to the physical sciences Hydrostatic paradox – Variation in pressure as a function of elevationPages displaying...
- ISBN 978-1-56670-681-0. Fontana, Fabrizio; DiCapua Roberto (August 2005). "Role of hydrostatic paradoxes towards the formation of the scientific thought of students at academic...
- Waterwichts ("Principles on the weight of water") on hydrostatics. He first details the hydrostatic paradox. 1596 – Galileo Galilei produces the first (Galileo)...
- Dark 1665 – New Experiments and Observations upon Cold 1666 – Hydrostatical Paradoxes 1666 – Origin of Forms and Qualities according to the Corpuscular...
- liquid column. The m**** of the fluid does not matter - see also hydrostatic paradox - i. e. not the total weight of the liquid in the container, but...
- Robert Boyle devised the "perpetual vase" ("perpetual goblet" or "hydrostatic paradox") which was discussed by Denis Papin in the Philosophical Transactions...
- consequence of the law of their composition. Stevin discovered the hydrostatic paradox, which states that the pressure in a liquid is independent of the...
- example in describing the measuring principle of a dasymeter and of hydrostatic weighing.) Example: If you drop wood into water, buoyancy will keep it...