Definition of Holy. Meaning of Holy. Synonyms of Holy

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Definition of Holy

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Holy Ghost
Ghost Ghost, n. [OE. gast, gost, soul, spirit, AS. g[=a]st breath, spirit, soul; akin to OS. g?st spirit, soul, D. geest, G. geist, and prob. to E. gaze, ghastly.] 1. The spirit; the soul of man. [Obs.] Then gives her grieved ghost thus to lament. --Spenser. 2. The disembodied soul; the soul or spirit of a deceased person; a spirit appearing after death; an apparition; a specter. The mighty ghosts of our great Harrys rose. --Shak. I thought that I had died in sleep, And was a blessed ghost. --Coleridge. 3. Any faint shadowy semblance; an unsubstantial image; a phantom; a glimmering; as, not a ghost of a chance; the ghost of an idea. Each separate dying ember wrought its ghost upon the floor. --Poe. 4. A false image formed in a telescope by reflection from the surfaces of one or more lenses. Ghost moth (Zo["o]l.), a large European moth (Hepialus humuli); so called from the white color of the male, and the peculiar hovering flight; -- called also great swift. Holy Ghost, the Holy Spirit; the Paraclete; the Comforter; (Theol.) the third person in the Trinity. To give up or yield up the ghost, to die; to expire. And he gave up the ghost full softly. --Chaucer. Jacob . . . yielded up the ghost, and was gathered unto his people. --Gen. xlix. 33.
Holy Spirit
Spirit Spir"it, n. [OF. espirit, esperit, F. esprit, L. spiritus, from spirare to breathe, to blow. Cf. Conspire, Expire, Esprit, Sprite.] 1. Air set in motion by breathing; breath; hence, sometimes, life itself. [Obs.] ``All of spirit would deprive.' --Spenser. The mild air, with season moderate, Gently attempered, and disposed eo well, That still it breathed foorth sweet spirit. --Spenser. 2. A rough breathing; an aspirate, as the letter h; also, a mark to denote aspiration; a breathing. [Obs.] Be it a letter or spirit, we have great use for it. --B. Jonson. 3. Life, or living substance, considered independently of corporeal existence; an intelligence conceived of apart from any physical organization or embodiment; vital essence, force, or energy, as distinct from matter. 4. The intelligent, immaterial and immortal part of man; the soul, in distinction from the body in which it resides; the agent or subject of vital and spiritual functions, whether spiritual or material. There is a spirit in man; and the inspiration of the Almighty giveth them understanding. --Job xxxii. 8. As the body without the spirit is dead, so faith without works is dead also. --James ii. 26. Spirit is a substance wherein thinking, knowing, doubting, and a power of moving, do subsist. --Locke. 5. Specifically, a disembodied soul; the human soul after it has left the body. Then shall the dust return to the earth as it was, and the spirit shall return unto God who gave it. --Eccl. xii. 7. Ye gentle spirits far away, With whom we shared the cup of grace. --Keble. 6. Any supernatural being, good or bad; an apparition; a specter; a ghost; also, sometimes, a sprite,; a fairy; an elf. Whilst young, preserve his tender mind from all impressions of spirits and goblins in the dark. --Locke. 7. Energy, vivacity, ardor, enthusiasm, courage, etc. ``Write it then, quickly,' replied Bede; and summoning all his spirits together, like the last blaze of a candle going out, he indited it, and expired. --Fuller. 8. One who is vivacious or lively; one who evinces great activity or peculiar characteristics of mind or temper; as, a ruling spirit; a schismatic spirit. Such spirits as he desired to please, such would I choose for my judges. --Dryden. 9. Temper or disposition of mind; mental condition or disposition; intellectual or moral state; -- often in the plural; as, to be cheerful, or in good spirits; to be downhearted, or in bad spirits. God has . . . made a spirit of building succeed a spirit of pulling down. --South. A perfect judge will read each work of wit With the same spirit that its author writ. --Pope. 10. Intent; real meaning; -- opposed to the letter, or to formal statement; also, characteristic quality, especially such as is derived from the individual genius or the personal character; as, the spirit of an enterprise, of a document, or the like. 11. Tenuous, volatile, airy, or vapory substance, possessed of active qualities. All bodies have spirits . . . within them. --Bacon. 12. Any liquid produced by distillation; especially, alcohol, the spirits, or spirit, of wine (it having been first distilled from wine): -- often in the plural. 13. pl. Rum, whisky, brandy, gin, and other distilled liquors having much alcohol, in distinction from wine and malt liquors. 14. (Med.) A solution in alcohol of a volatile principle. Cf. Tincture. --U. S. Disp. 15. (Alchemy) Any one of the four substances, sulphur, sal ammoniac, quicksilver, or arsenic (or, according to some, orpiment). The four spirits and the bodies seven. --Chaucer. 16. (Dyeing) Stannic chloride. See under Stannic. Note: Spirit is sometimes joined with other words, forming compounds, generally of obvious signification; as, spirit-moving, spirit-searching, spirit-stirring, etc. Astral spirits, Familiar spirits, etc. See under Astral, Familiar, etc. Animal spirits. (a) (Physiol.) The fluid which at one time was supposed to circulate through the nerves and was regarded as the agent of sensation and motion; -- called also the nervous fluid, or nervous principle. (b) Physical health and energy; frolicsomeness; sportiveness. Ardent spirits, strong alcoholic liquors, as brandy, rum, whisky, etc., obtained by distillation. Holy Spirit, or The Spirit (Theol.), the Spirit of God, or the third person of the Trinity; the Holy Ghost. The spirit also signifies the human spirit as influenced or animated by the Divine Spirit. Proof spirit. (Chem.) See under Proof. Rectified spirit (Chem.), spirit rendered purer or more concentrated by redistillation, so as to increase the percentage of absolute alcohol. Spirit butterfly (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of delicate butterflies of tropical America belonging to the genus Ithomia. The wings are gauzy and nearly destitute of scales. Spirit duck. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The buffle-headed duck. (b) The golden-eye. Spirit lamp (Art), a lamp in which alcohol or methylated spirit is burned. Spirit level. See under Level. Spirit of hartshorn. (Old Chem.) See under Hartshorn. Spirit of Mindererus (Med.), an aqueous solution of acetate of ammonium; -- named after R. Minderer, physician of Augsburg. Spirit of nitrous ether (Med. Chem.), a pale yellow liquid, of a sweetish taste and a pleasant ethereal odor. It is obtained by the distillation of alcohol with nitric and sulphuric acids, and consists essentially of ethyl nitrite with a little acetic aldehyde. It is used as a diaphoretic, diuretic, antispasmodic, etc. Called also sweet spirit of niter. Spirit of salt (Chem.), hydrochloric acid; -- so called because obtained from salt and sulphuric acid. [Obs.] Spirit of sense, the utmost refinement of sensation. [Obs.] --Shak. Spirits, or Spirit, of turpentine (Chem.), rectified oil of turpentine, a transparent, colorless, volatile, and very inflammable liquid, distilled from the turpentine of the various species of pine; camphine. See Camphine. Spirit of vitriol (Chem.), sulphuric acid; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of green vitriol. [Obs.] Spirit of vitriolic ether (Chem.) ether; -- often but incorrectly called sulphuric ether. See Ether. [Obs.] Spirits, or Spirit, of wine (Chem.), alcohol; -- so called because formerly obtained by the distillation of wine. Spirit rapper, one who practices spirit rapping; a ``medium' so called. Spirit rapping, an alleged form of communication with the spirits of the dead by raps. See Spiritualism, 3. Sweet spirit of niter. See Spirit of nitrous ether, above.
Holy Spirit plant
Dove plant Dove" plant` (Bot.) A Central American orchid (Peristeria elata), having a flower stem five or six feet high, with numerous globose white fragrant flowers. The column in the center of the flower resembles a dove; -- called also Holy Spirit plant.
Holy Thursday
Thursday Thurs"day, n. [OE. [thorn]ursdei, [thorn]orsday, from the Scand. name Thor + E. day. Icel. [thorn][=o]rr Thor, the god of thunder, is akin to AS. [thorn]unor thunder; D. Donderdag Thursday, G. Donnerstag, Icel. [thorn][=o]rsdagr, Sw. & Dan. Torsdag. [root]52. See Thor, Thunder, and Day.] The fifth day of the week, following Wednesday and preceding Friday. Holy Thursday. See under Holy.
Holy war
War War, n. [OE. & AS. werre; akin to OHG. werra scandal, quarrel, sedition, werran to confound, mix, D. warren, G. wirren, verwirren, to embroil, confound, disturb, and perhaps to E. worse; cf. OF. werre war, F. querre, of Teutonic origin. Cf. Guerrilla, Warrior.] 1. A contest between nations or states, carried on by force, whether for defence, for revenging insults and redressing wrongs, for the extension of commerce, for the acquisition of territory, for obtaining and establishing the superiority and dominion of one over the other, or for any other purpose; armed conflict of sovereign powers; declared and open hostilities. Men will ever distinguish war from mere bloodshed. --F. W. Robertson. Note: As war is the contest of nations or states, it always implies that such contest is authorized by the monarch or the sovereign power of the nation. A war begun by attacking another nation, is called an offensive war, and such attack is aggressive. War undertaken to repel invasion, or the attacks of an enemy, is called defensive. 2. (Law) A condition of belligerency to be maintained by physical force. In this sense, levying war against the sovereign authority is treason. 3. Instruments of war. [Poetic] His complement of stores, and total war. --Prior. 4. Forces; army. [Poetic] On their embattled ranks the waves return, And overwhelm their war. --Milton. 5. The profession of arms; the art of war. Thou art but a youth, and he is a man of war from his youth. --1 Sam. xvii. 33. 6. a state of opposition or contest; an act of opposition; an inimical contest, act, or action; enmity; hostility. ``Raised impious war in heaven.' --Milton. The words of his mouth were smoother than butter, but war was in his heart. --Ps. lv. 21. Civil war, a war between different sections or parties of the same country or nation. Holy war. See under Holy. Man of war. (Naut.) See in the Vocabulary. Public war, a war between independent sovereign states. War cry, a cry or signal used in war; as, the Indian war cry. War dance, a dance among savages preliminary to going to war. Among the North American Indians, it is begun by some distinguished chief, and whoever joins in it thereby enlists as one of the party engaged in a warlike excursion. --Schoolcraft. War field, a field of war or battle. War horse, a horse used in war; the horse of a cavalry soldier; especially, a strong, powerful, spirited horse for military service; a charger. War paint, paint put on the face and other parts of the body by savages, as a token of going to war. ``Wash the war paint from your faces.' --Longfellow. War song, a song of or pertaining to war; especially, among the American Indians, a song at the war dance, full of incitements to military ardor. War whoop, a war cry, especially that uttered by the American Indians.
Holy water
Holy water (Gr. & R. C. Churches), water which has been blessed by the priest for sacred purposes. Holy-water stoup, the stone stoup or font placed near the entrance of a church, as a receptacle for holy water. Holy Week (Eccl.), the week before Easter, in which the passion of our Savior is commemorated. Holy writ, the sacred Scriptures. `` Word of holy writ.' --Wordsworth.
Holy Week
Holy water (Gr. & R. C. Churches), water which has been blessed by the priest for sacred purposes. Holy-water stoup, the stone stoup or font placed near the entrance of a church, as a receptacle for holy water. Holy Week (Eccl.), the week before Easter, in which the passion of our Savior is commemorated. Holy writ, the sacred Scriptures. `` Word of holy writ.' --Wordsworth.
Holy writ
Holy water (Gr. & R. C. Churches), water which has been blessed by the priest for sacred purposes. Holy-water stoup, the stone stoup or font placed near the entrance of a church, as a receptacle for holy water. Holy Week (Eccl.), the week before Easter, in which the passion of our Savior is commemorated. Holy writ, the sacred Scriptures. `` Word of holy writ.' --Wordsworth.
Holyday
Holyday Ho"ly*day`, n. 1. A religious festival. 2. A secular festival; a holiday. Note: Holiday is the preferable and prevailing spelling in the second sense. The spelling holy day or holyday in often used in the first sense.
Holystone
Holystone Ho"ly*stone`, n. (Naut.) A stone used by seamen for scrubbing the decks of ships. --Totten.
Holystone
Holystone Ho"ly*stone`, v. t. (Naut.) To scrub with a holystone, as the deck of a vessel.
holy-water stoup
Stoup Stoup, n. [See Stoop a vessel.] 1. A flagon; a vessel or measure for liquids. [Scot.] 2. (Eccl.) A basin at the entrance of Roman Catholic churches for containing the holy water with which those who enter, dipping their fingers in it, cross themselves; -- called also holy-water stoup.
Holy-water stoup
Holy water (Gr. & R. C. Churches), water which has been blessed by the priest for sacred purposes. Holy-water stoup, the stone stoup or font placed near the entrance of a church, as a receptacle for holy water. Holy Week (Eccl.), the week before Easter, in which the passion of our Savior is commemorated. Holy writ, the sacred Scriptures. `` Word of holy writ.' --Wordsworth.
Melancholy
Melancholy Mel"an*chol*y, a. 1. Depressed in spirits; dejected; gloomy dismal. --Shak. 2. Producing great evil and grief; causing dejection; calamitous; afflictive; as, a melancholy event. 3. Somewhat deranged in mind; having the jugment impaired. [Obs.] --Bp. Reynolds. 4. Favorable to meditation; somber. A pretty, melancholy seat, well wooded and watered. --Evelin. Syn: Gloomy; sad; dispirited; low-spirited; downhearted; unhappy; hypochondriac; disconsolate; heavy, doleful; dismal; calamitous; afflictive.
Pompholyx
Pompholyx Pom"pho*lyx, n. [L., fr. Gr. ? a bubble, the slag on the surface of smelted ore, from ? a blister.] 1. (Old Chem.) Impure zinc oxide. 2. (Med.) A skin disease in which there is an eruption of bull[ae], without inflammation or fever.
Scholy
Scholy Scho"ly, v. i. & t. To write scholia; to annotate. [Obs.]
Scholy
Scholy Scho"ly, n. A scholium. [Obs.] --Hooker.
The Holy Father
Father Fa"ther, n. [OE. fader, AS. f[ae]der; akin to OS. fadar, D. vader, OHG. fatar, G. vater, Icel. Fa?ir Sw. & Dan. fader, OIr. athir, L. pater, Gr. ?????, Skr. pitr, perh. fr. Skr. p[=a] protect. ???,???. Cf. Papa, Paternal, Patriot, Potential, Pablum.] 1. One who has begotten a child, whether son or daughter; a generator; a male parent. A wise son maketh a glad father. --Prov. x. 1. 2. A male ancestor more remote than a parent; a progenitor; especially, a first ancestor; a founder of a race or family; -- in the plural, fathers, ancestors. David slept with his fathers. --1 Kings ii. 10. Abraham, who is the father of us all. --Rom. iv. 16. 3. One who performs the offices of a parent by maintenance, affetionate care, counsel, or protection. I was a father to the poor. --Job xxix. 16. He hath made me a father to Pharaoh, and lord of all his house. --Gen. xiv. 8. 4. A respectful mode of address to an old man. And Joash the king og Israel came down unto him [Elisha], . . . and said, O my father, my father! --2 Kings xiii. 14. 5. A senator of ancient Rome. 6. A dignitary of the church, a superior of a convent, a confessor (called also father confessor), or a priest; also, the eldest member of a profession, or of a legislative assembly, etc. Bless you, good father friar ! --Shak. 7. One of the chief esslesiastical authorities of the first centuries after Christ; -- often spoken of collectively as the Fathers; as, the Latin, Greek, or apostolic Fathers. 8. One who, or that which, gives origin; an originator; a producer, author, or contriver; the first to practice any art, profession, or occupation; a distinguished example or teacher. The father of all such as handle the harp and organ. --Gen. iv. 21. Might be the father, Harry, to that thought. --Shak. The father of good news. --Shak. 9. The Supreme Being and Creator; God; in theology, the first person in the Trinity. Our Father, which art in heaven. --Matt. vi. 9. Now had the almighty Father from above . . . Bent down his eye. --Milton. Adoptive father, one who adopts the child of another, treating it as his own. Apostolic father, Conscript fathers, etc. See under Apostolic, Conscript, etc. Father in God, a title given to bishops. Father of lies, the Devil. Father of the bar, the oldest practitioner at the bar. Fathers of the city, the aldermen. Father of the Faithful. (a) Abraham. --Rom. iv. --Gal. iii. 6-9. (b) Mohammed, or one of the sultans, his successors. Father of the house, the member of a legislative body who has had the longest continuous service. Most Reverend Father in God, a title given to archbishops and metropolitans, as to the archbishops of Canterbury and York. Natural father, the father of an illegitimate child. Putative father, one who is presumed to be the father of an illegitimate child; the supposed father. Spiritual father. (a) A religious teacher or guide, esp. one instrumental in leading a soul to God. (b) (R. C. Ch.) A priest who hears confession in the sacrament of penance. The Holy Father (R. C. Ch.), the pope.
Unholy
Unholy Un*ho"ly, a. Not holy; unhallowed; not consecrated; hence, profane; wicked; impious. -- Un*ho"li*ly, adv. -- Un*ho"li*ness, n.

Meaning of Holy from wikipedia

- believe in Holy Sacraments that the clergy perform, such as Holy Communion and Holy Baptism, as well as strong belief in the Holy Catholic Church, Holy Scripture...
- line (Holy, Holy, Holy! Lord God Almighty!) references Isaiah 6:3, Revelation 4:8 and mirrors the opening line of the Sanctus (Holy, Holy, Holy, Lord...
- The Holy of Holies (Tiberian Hebrew: קֹדֶשׁ הַקֳּדָשִׁים Qṓḏeš HaQŏḏāšîm) is a term in the Hebrew Bible which refers to the inner sanctuary of the Tabernacle...
- The Holy See (Latin: Sancta Sedes; Latin pronunciation: [ˈsaŋkta ˈsedes]; Italian: Santa Sede), also called the See of Rome, refers to the jurisdiction...
- "Holy...!" (for example "Holy cow!", "Holy mackerel!" or "Holy smoke!") is an exclamation of surprise used mostly in English-speaking countries. Robin...
- Western Europe. Latin biblia sacra "holy books" translates Gr**** τὰ βιβλία τὰ ἅγια tà biblía tà ágia, "the holy books". The word βιβλίον itself had the...
- Holy Living and Holy Dying is the collective title of two books of Christian devotion by Jeremy Taylor. They were originally published as The Rules and...
- The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail (published as Holy Blood, Holy Grail in the United States) is a book by Michael Baigent, Richard Leigh and Henry Lincoln...
- "Holy Holy" is a song by David Bowie, originally released as a single in January 1971. It was recorded in November 1970, after the completion of The Man...
- The Holy Roman Empire (Latin: Sacrum Imperium Romanum; German: Heiliges Römisches Reich) was a multi-ethnic complex of territories in Western and Central...
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