Definition of Ect . Meaning of Ect . Synonyms of Ect

Here you will find one or more explanations in English for the word Ect . Also in the bottom left of the page several parts of wikipedia pages related to the word Ect and, of course, Ect synonyms and on the right images related to the word Ect .

Definition of Ect

No result for Ect . Showing similar results...

A direct induced current
Direct current Direct current (Elec.) (a) A current flowing in one direction only; -- distinguished from alternating current. When steady and not pulsating a direct current is often called a continuous current. (b) A direct induced current, or momentary current of the same direction as the inducing current, produced by stopping or removing the latter; also, a similar current produced by removal of a magnet.
Aspect of a plane
Aspect As"pect, n. [L. aspectus, fr. aspicere, aspectum, to look at; ad + spicere, specere, to look, akin to E. spy.] 1. The act of looking; vision; gaze; glance. [R.] ``The basilisk killeth by aspect.' --Bacon. His aspect was bent on the ground. --Sir W. Scott. 2. Look, or particular appearance of the face; countenance; mien; air. ``Serious in aspect.' --Dryden. [Craggs] with aspect open shall erect his head. --Pope. 3. Appearance to the eye or the mind; look; view. ``The aspect of affairs.' --Macaulay. The true aspect of a world lying in its rubbish. --T. Burnet. 4. Position or situation with regard to seeing; that position which enables one to look in a particular direction; position in relation to the points of the compass; as, a house has a southern aspect, that is, a position which faces the south. 5. Prospect; outlook. [Obs.] This town affords a good aspect toward the hill from whence we descended. --Evelyn. 6. (Astrol.) The situation of planets or stars with respect to one another, or the angle formed by the rays of light proceeding from them and meeting at the eye; the joint look of planets or stars upon each other or upon the earth. --Milton. Note: The aspects which two planets can assume are five; sextile, ?, when the planets are 60[deg] apart; quartile, or quadrate, ?, when their distance is 90[deg] or the quarter of a circle; trine, ?, when the distance is 120[deg]; opposition, ?, when the distance is 180[deg], or half a circle; and conjunction, ?, when they are in the same degree. Astrology taught that the aspects of the planets exerted an influence on human affairs, in some situations for good and in others for evil. 7. (Astrol.) The influence of the stars for good or evil; as, an ill aspect. --Shak. The astrologers call the evil influences of the stars evil aspects. --Bacon. Aspect of a plane (Geom.), the direction of the plane.
Aspect ratio
Aspect ratio Aspect ratio (A["e]ronautics) The ratio of the long to the short side of an a["e]roplane, a["e]rocurve, or wing.
Direct action
Direct action Direct action (Trade unions) See Syndicalism, below.
Direct action
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See Dress, and cf. Dirge.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. 2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. Be even and direct with me. --Shak. 3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. 4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. 5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. Direct action. (Mach.) See Direct-acting. Direct discourse (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;' -- correlative to indirect discourse, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, oratio directa, and oratio obliqua. Direct evidence (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to circumstantial, or indirect, evidence. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton. Direct examination (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott. Direct fire (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at. Direct process (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight. Direct tax, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise.
Direct current
Direct current Direct current (Elec.) (a) A current flowing in one direction only; -- distinguished from alternating current. When steady and not pulsating a direct current is often called a continuous current. (b) A direct induced current, or momentary current of the same direction as the inducing current, produced by stopping or removing the latter; also, a similar current produced by removal of a magnet.
Direct discourse
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See Dress, and cf. Dirge.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. 2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. Be even and direct with me. --Shak. 3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. 4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. 5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. Direct action. (Mach.) See Direct-acting. Direct discourse (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;' -- correlative to indirect discourse, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, oratio directa, and oratio obliqua. Direct evidence (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to circumstantial, or indirect, evidence. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton. Direct examination (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott. Direct fire (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at. Direct process (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight. Direct tax, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise.
Direct evidence
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See Dress, and cf. Dirge.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. 2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. Be even and direct with me. --Shak. 3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. 4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. 5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. Direct action. (Mach.) See Direct-acting. Direct discourse (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;' -- correlative to indirect discourse, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, oratio directa, and oratio obliqua. Direct evidence (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to circumstantial, or indirect, evidence. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton. Direct examination (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott. Direct fire (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at. Direct process (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight. Direct tax, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise.
Direct examination
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See Dress, and cf. Dirge.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. 2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. Be even and direct with me. --Shak. 3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. 4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. 5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. Direct action. (Mach.) See Direct-acting. Direct discourse (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;' -- correlative to indirect discourse, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, oratio directa, and oratio obliqua. Direct evidence (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to circumstantial, or indirect, evidence. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton. Direct examination (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott. Direct fire (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at. Direct process (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight. Direct tax, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise.
Direct examination
Examination Ex*am`i*na"tion, n. [L. examinatio: cf. F. examination.] 1. The act of examining, or state of being examined; a careful search, investigation, or inquiry; scrutiny by study or experiment. 2. A process prescribed or assigned for testing qualification; as, the examination of a student, or of a candidate for admission to the bar or the ministry. He neglected the studies, . . . stood low at the examinations. --Macaulay. Examination in chief, or Direct examination (Law), that examination which is made of a witness by a party calling him. Cross-examination, that made by the opposite party. Re["e]xamination, or Re-direct examination, that made by a party calling a witness, after, and upon matters arising out of, the cross-examination. Syn: Search; inquiry; investigation; research; scrutiny; inquisition; inspection; exploration.
Direct fire
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See Dress, and cf. Dirge.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. 2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. Be even and direct with me. --Shak. 3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. 4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. 5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. Direct action. (Mach.) See Direct-acting. Direct discourse (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;' -- correlative to indirect discourse, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, oratio directa, and oratio obliqua. Direct evidence (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to circumstantial, or indirect, evidence. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton. Direct examination (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott. Direct fire (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at. Direct process (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight. Direct tax, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise.
Direct nomination
Direct nomination Direct nomination (Political Science) The nomination or designation of candidates for public office by direct popular vote rather than through the action of a convention or body of elected nominating representatives or delegates. The term is applied both to the nomination of candidates without any nominating convention, and, loosely, to the nomination effected, as in the case of candidates for president or senator of the United States, by the election of nominating representatives pledged or instructed to vote for certain candidates dssignated by popular vote.
Direct primary
Direct primary Direct primary (Political Science) A primary by which direct nominations of candidates for office are made.
Direct process
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See Dress, and cf. Dirge.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. 2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. Be even and direct with me. --Shak. 3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. 4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. 5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. Direct action. (Mach.) See Direct-acting. Direct discourse (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;' -- correlative to indirect discourse, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, oratio directa, and oratio obliqua. Direct evidence (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to circumstantial, or indirect, evidence. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton. Direct examination (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott. Direct fire (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at. Direct process (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight. Direct tax, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise.
Direct tax
Direct Di*rect", a. [L. directus, p. p. of dirigere to direct: cf. F. direct. See Dress, and cf. Dirge.] 1. Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means. What is direct to, what slides by, the question. --Locke. 2. Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken. Be even and direct with me. --Shak. 3. Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous. He nowhere, that I know, says it in direct words. --Locke. A direct and avowed interference with elections. --Hallam. 4. In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line. 5. (Astron.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; -- said of the motion of a celestial body. Direct action. (Mach.) See Direct-acting. Direct discourse (Gram.), the language of any one quoted without change in its form; as, he said ``I can not come;' -- correlative to indirect discourse, in which there is change of form; as, he said that he could not come. They are often called respectively by their Latin names, oratio directa, and oratio obliqua. Direct evidence (Law), evidence which is positive or not inferential; -- opposed to circumstantial, or indirect, evidence. -- This distinction, however, is merely formal, since there is no direct evidence that is not circumstantial, or dependent on circumstances for its credibility. --Wharton. Direct examination (Law), the first examination of a witness in the orderly course, upon the merits. --Abbott. Direct fire (Mil.), fire, the direction of which is perpendicular to the line of troops or to the parapet aimed at. Direct process (Metal.), one which yields metal in working condition by a single process from the ore. --Knight. Direct tax, a tax assessed directly on lands, etc., and polls, distinguished from taxes on merchandise, or customs, and from excise.
Direct vision
Vision Vi"sion, n. [OE. visioun, F. vision, fr. L. visio, from videre, visum, to see: akin to Gr. ? to see, ? I know, and E. wit. See Wit, v., and cf. Advice, Clairvoyant, Envy, Evident, Provide, Revise, Survey, View, Visage, Visit.] 1. The act of seeing external objects; actual sight. Faith here is turned into vision there. --Hammond. 2. (Physiol.) The faculty of seeing; sight; one of the five senses, by which colors and the physical qualities of external objects are appreciated as a result of the stimulating action of light on the sensitive retina, an expansion of the optic nerve. 3. That which is seen; an object of sight. --Shak. 4. Especially, that which is seen otherwise than by the ordinary sight, or the rational eye; a supernatural, prophetic, or imaginary sight; an apparition; a phantom; a specter; as, the visions of Isaiah. The baseless fabric of this vision. --Shak. No dreams, but visions strange. --Sir P. Sidney. 5. Hence, something unreal or imaginary; a creation of fancy. --Locke. Arc of vision (Astron.), the arc which measures the least distance from the sun at which, when the sun is below the horizon, a star or planet emerging from his rays becomes visible. Beatific vision (Theol.), the immediate sight of God in heaven. Direct vision (Opt.), vision when the image of the object falls directly on the yellow spot (see under Yellow); also, vision by means of rays which are not deviated from their original direction. Field of vision, field of view. See under Field. Indirect vision (Opt.), vision when the rays of light from an object fall upon the peripheral parts of the retina. Reflected vision, or Refracted vision, vision by rays reflected from mirrors, or refracted by lenses or prisms, respectively. Vision purple. (Physiol.) See Visual purple, under Visual.
Indirect claims
Indirect In`di*rect", a. [Pref. in- not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. 2. Not tending to an aim, purpose, or result by the plainest course, or by obvious means, but obliquely or consequentially; by remote means; as, an indirect accusation, attack, answer, or proposal. By what bypaths and indirect, crooked ways I met this crown. --Shak. 3. Not straightforward or upright; unfair; dishonest; tending to mislead or deceive. Indirect dealing will be discovered one time or other. --Tillotson. 4. Not resulting directly from an act or cause, but more or less remotely connected with or growing out of it; as, indirect results, damages, or claims. 5. (Logic & Math.) Not reaching the end aimed at by the most plain and direct method; as, an indirect proof, demonstration, etc. Indirect claims, claims for remote or consequential damage. Such claims were presented to and thrown out by the commissioners who arbitrated the damage inflicted on the United States by the Confederate States cruisers built and supplied by Great Britain. Indirect demonstration, a mode of demonstration in which proof is given by showing that any other supposition involves an absurdity (reductio ad absurdum), or an impossibility; thus, one quantity may be proved equal to another by showing that it can be neither greater nor less. Indirect discourse. (Gram.) See Direct discourse, under Direct. Indirect evidence, evidence or testimony which is circumstantial or inferential, but without witness; -- opposed to direct evidence. Indirect tax, a tax, such as customs, excises,
Indirect demonstration
Indirect In`di*rect", a. [Pref. in- not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. 2. Not tending to an aim, purpose, or result by the plainest course, or by obvious means, but obliquely or consequentially; by remote means; as, an indirect accusation, attack, answer, or proposal. By what bypaths and indirect, crooked ways I met this crown. --Shak. 3. Not straightforward or upright; unfair; dishonest; tending to mislead or deceive. Indirect dealing will be discovered one time or other. --Tillotson. 4. Not resulting directly from an act or cause, but more or less remotely connected with or growing out of it; as, indirect results, damages, or claims. 5. (Logic & Math.) Not reaching the end aimed at by the most plain and direct method; as, an indirect proof, demonstration, etc. Indirect claims, claims for remote or consequential damage. Such claims were presented to and thrown out by the commissioners who arbitrated the damage inflicted on the United States by the Confederate States cruisers built and supplied by Great Britain. Indirect demonstration, a mode of demonstration in which proof is given by showing that any other supposition involves an absurdity (reductio ad absurdum), or an impossibility; thus, one quantity may be proved equal to another by showing that it can be neither greater nor less. Indirect discourse. (Gram.) See Direct discourse, under Direct. Indirect evidence, evidence or testimony which is circumstantial or inferential, but without witness; -- opposed to direct evidence. Indirect tax, a tax, such as customs, excises,
Indirect discourse
Indirect In`di*rect", a. [Pref. in- not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. 2. Not tending to an aim, purpose, or result by the plainest course, or by obvious means, but obliquely or consequentially; by remote means; as, an indirect accusation, attack, answer, or proposal. By what bypaths and indirect, crooked ways I met this crown. --Shak. 3. Not straightforward or upright; unfair; dishonest; tending to mislead or deceive. Indirect dealing will be discovered one time or other. --Tillotson. 4. Not resulting directly from an act or cause, but more or less remotely connected with or growing out of it; as, indirect results, damages, or claims. 5. (Logic & Math.) Not reaching the end aimed at by the most plain and direct method; as, an indirect proof, demonstration, etc. Indirect claims, claims for remote or consequential damage. Such claims were presented to and thrown out by the commissioners who arbitrated the damage inflicted on the United States by the Confederate States cruisers built and supplied by Great Britain. Indirect demonstration, a mode of demonstration in which proof is given by showing that any other supposition involves an absurdity (reductio ad absurdum), or an impossibility; thus, one quantity may be proved equal to another by showing that it can be neither greater nor less. Indirect discourse. (Gram.) See Direct discourse, under Direct. Indirect evidence, evidence or testimony which is circumstantial or inferential, but without witness; -- opposed to direct evidence. Indirect tax, a tax, such as customs, excises,
Indirect evidence
Indirect In`di*rect", a. [Pref. in- not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. 2. Not tending to an aim, purpose, or result by the plainest course, or by obvious means, but obliquely or consequentially; by remote means; as, an indirect accusation, attack, answer, or proposal. By what bypaths and indirect, crooked ways I met this crown. --Shak. 3. Not straightforward or upright; unfair; dishonest; tending to mislead or deceive. Indirect dealing will be discovered one time or other. --Tillotson. 4. Not resulting directly from an act or cause, but more or less remotely connected with or growing out of it; as, indirect results, damages, or claims. 5. (Logic & Math.) Not reaching the end aimed at by the most plain and direct method; as, an indirect proof, demonstration, etc. Indirect claims, claims for remote or consequential damage. Such claims were presented to and thrown out by the commissioners who arbitrated the damage inflicted on the United States by the Confederate States cruisers built and supplied by Great Britain. Indirect demonstration, a mode of demonstration in which proof is given by showing that any other supposition involves an absurdity (reductio ad absurdum), or an impossibility; thus, one quantity may be proved equal to another by showing that it can be neither greater nor less. Indirect discourse. (Gram.) See Direct discourse, under Direct. Indirect evidence, evidence or testimony which is circumstantial or inferential, but without witness; -- opposed to direct evidence. Indirect tax, a tax, such as customs, excises,
Indirect tax
Indirect In`di*rect", a. [Pref. in- not + direct: cf. F. indirect.] 1. Not direct; not straight or rectilinear; deviating from a direct line or course; circuitous; as, an indirect road. 2. Not tending to an aim, purpose, or result by the plainest course, or by obvious means, but obliquely or consequentially; by remote means; as, an indirect accusation, attack, answer, or proposal. By what bypaths and indirect, crooked ways I met this crown. --Shak. 3. Not straightforward or upright; unfair; dishonest; tending to mislead or deceive. Indirect dealing will be discovered one time or other. --Tillotson. 4. Not resulting directly from an act or cause, but more or less remotely connected with or growing out of it; as, indirect results, damages, or claims. 5. (Logic & Math.) Not reaching the end aimed at by the most plain and direct method; as, an indirect proof, demonstration, etc. Indirect claims, claims for remote or consequential damage. Such claims were presented to and thrown out by the commissioners who arbitrated the damage inflicted on the United States by the Confederate States cruisers built and supplied by Great Britain. Indirect demonstration, a mode of demonstration in which proof is given by showing that any other supposition involves an absurdity (reductio ad absurdum), or an impossibility; thus, one quantity may be proved equal to another by showing that it can be neither greater nor less. Indirect discourse. (Gram.) See Direct discourse, under Direct. Indirect evidence, evidence or testimony which is circumstantial or inferential, but without witness; -- opposed to direct evidence. Indirect tax, a tax, such as customs, excises,
Indirect vision
Vision Vi"sion, n. [OE. visioun, F. vision, fr. L. visio, from videre, visum, to see: akin to Gr. ? to see, ? I know, and E. wit. See Wit, v., and cf. Advice, Clairvoyant, Envy, Evident, Provide, Revise, Survey, View, Visage, Visit.] 1. The act of seeing external objects; actual sight. Faith here is turned into vision there. --Hammond. 2. (Physiol.) The faculty of seeing; sight; one of the five senses, by which colors and the physical qualities of external objects are appreciated as a result of the stimulating action of light on the sensitive retina, an expansion of the optic nerve. 3. That which is seen; an object of sight. --Shak. 4. Especially, that which is seen otherwise than by the ordinary sight, or the rational eye; a supernatural, prophetic, or imaginary sight; an apparition; a phantom; a specter; as, the visions of Isaiah. The baseless fabric of this vision. --Shak. No dreams, but visions strange. --Sir P. Sidney. 5. Hence, something unreal or imaginary; a creation of fancy. --Locke. Arc of vision (Astron.), the arc which measures the least distance from the sun at which, when the sun is below the horizon, a star or planet emerging from his rays becomes visible. Beatific vision (Theol.), the immediate sight of God in heaven. Direct vision (Opt.), vision when the image of the object falls directly on the yellow spot (see under Yellow); also, vision by means of rays which are not deviated from their original direction. Field of vision, field of view. See under Field. Indirect vision (Opt.), vision when the rays of light from an object fall upon the peripheral parts of the retina. Reflected vision, or Refracted vision, vision by rays reflected from mirrors, or refracted by lenses or prisms, respectively. Vision purple. (Physiol.) See Visual purple, under Visual.
Insect powder
Insect powder,a powder used for the extermination of insects; esp., the powdered flowers of certain species of Pyrethrum, a genus now merged in Chrysanthemum. Called also Persian powder.
Object glass
Object, beside its proper signification, came to be abusively applied to denote motive, end, final cause . . . . This innovation was probably borrowed from the French. --Sir. W. Hamilton. Let our object be, our country, our whole country, and nothing but our country. --D. Webster. 4. Sight; show; appearance; aspect. [Obs.] --Shak. He, advancing close Up to the lake, past all the rest, arose In glorious object. --Chapman. 5. (Gram.) A word, phrase, or clause toward which an action is directed, or is considered to be directed; as, the object of a transitive verb. Object glass, the lens, or system of lenses, placed at the end of a telescope, microscope, etc., which is toward the object. Its office is to form an image of the object, which is then viewed by the eyepiece. Called also objective. See Illust. of Microscope. Object lesson, a lesson in which object teaching is made use of. Object staff. (Leveling) Same as Leveling staff. Object teaching, a method of instruction, in which illustrative objects are employed, each new word or idea being accompanied by a representation of that which it signifies; -- used especially in the kindergarten, for young children.
Object lesson
Object, beside its proper signification, came to be abusively applied to denote motive, end, final cause . . . . This innovation was probably borrowed from the French. --Sir. W. Hamilton. Let our object be, our country, our whole country, and nothing but our country. --D. Webster. 4. Sight; show; appearance; aspect. [Obs.] --Shak. He, advancing close Up to the lake, past all the rest, arose In glorious object. --Chapman. 5. (Gram.) A word, phrase, or clause toward which an action is directed, or is considered to be directed; as, the object of a transitive verb. Object glass, the lens, or system of lenses, placed at the end of a telescope, microscope, etc., which is toward the object. Its office is to form an image of the object, which is then viewed by the eyepiece. Called also objective. See Illust. of Microscope. Object lesson, a lesson in which object teaching is made use of. Object staff. (Leveling) Same as Leveling staff. Object teaching, a method of instruction, in which illustrative objects are employed, each new word or idea being accompanied by a representation of that which it signifies; -- used especially in the kindergarten, for young children.
Object staff
Object, beside its proper signification, came to be abusively applied to denote motive, end, final cause . . . . This innovation was probably borrowed from the French. --Sir. W. Hamilton. Let our object be, our country, our whole country, and nothing but our country. --D. Webster. 4. Sight; show; appearance; aspect. [Obs.] --Shak. He, advancing close Up to the lake, past all the rest, arose In glorious object. --Chapman. 5. (Gram.) A word, phrase, or clause toward which an action is directed, or is considered to be directed; as, the object of a transitive verb. Object glass, the lens, or system of lenses, placed at the end of a telescope, microscope, etc., which is toward the object. Its office is to form an image of the object, which is then viewed by the eyepiece. Called also objective. See Illust. of Microscope. Object lesson, a lesson in which object teaching is made use of. Object staff. (Leveling) Same as Leveling staff. Object teaching, a method of instruction, in which illustrative objects are employed, each new word or idea being accompanied by a representation of that which it signifies; -- used especially in the kindergarten, for young children.
Object teaching
Object, beside its proper signification, came to be abusively applied to denote motive, end, final cause . . . . This innovation was probably borrowed from the French. --Sir. W. Hamilton. Let our object be, our country, our whole country, and nothing but our country. --D. Webster. 4. Sight; show; appearance; aspect. [Obs.] --Shak. He, advancing close Up to the lake, past all the rest, arose In glorious object. --Chapman. 5. (Gram.) A word, phrase, or clause toward which an action is directed, or is considered to be directed; as, the object of a transitive verb. Object glass, the lens, or system of lenses, placed at the end of a telescope, microscope, etc., which is toward the object. Its office is to form an image of the object, which is then viewed by the eyepiece. Called also objective. See Illust. of Microscope. Object lesson, a lesson in which object teaching is made use of. Object staff. (Leveling) Same as Leveling staff. Object teaching, a method of instruction, in which illustrative objects are employed, each new word or idea being accompanied by a representation of that which it signifies; -- used especially in the kindergarten, for young children.
Perfect cadence
Perfect Per"fect, a. [OE. parfit, OF. parfit, parfet, parfait, F. parfait, L. perfectus, p. p. of perficere to carry to the end, to perform, finish, perfect; per (see Per-) + facere to make, do. See Fact.] 1. Brought to consummation or completeness; completed; not defective nor redundant; having all the properties or qualities requisite to its nature and kind; without flaw, fault, or blemish; without error; mature; whole; pure; sound; right; correct. My strength is made perfect in weakness. --2 Cor. xii. 9. Three glorious suns, each one a perfect sun. --Shak. I fear I am not in my perfect mind. --Shak. O most entire perfect sacrifice! --Keble. God made thee perfect, not immutable. --Milton. 2. Well informed; certain; sure. I am perfect that the Pannonains are now in arms. --Shak. 3. (Bot.) Hermaphrodite; having both stamens and pistils; -- said of flower. Perfect cadence (Mus.), a complete and satisfactory close in harmony, as upon the tonic preceded by the dominant. Perfect chord (Mus.), a concord or union of sounds which is perfectly coalescent and agreeable to the ear, as the unison, octave, fifth, and fourth; a perfect consonance; a common chord in its original position of keynote, third, fifth, and octave. Perfect number (Arith.), a number equal to the sum of all its divisors; as, 28, whose aliquot parts, or divisors, are 14, 7, 4, 2, 1. See Abundant number, under Abundant. --Brande & C. Perfect tense (Gram.), a tense which expresses an act or state completed.
Perfect chord
Perfect Per"fect, a. [OE. parfit, OF. parfit, parfet, parfait, F. parfait, L. perfectus, p. p. of perficere to carry to the end, to perform, finish, perfect; per (see Per-) + facere to make, do. See Fact.] 1. Brought to consummation or completeness; completed; not defective nor redundant; having all the properties or qualities requisite to its nature and kind; without flaw, fault, or blemish; without error; mature; whole; pure; sound; right; correct. My strength is made perfect in weakness. --2 Cor. xii. 9. Three glorious suns, each one a perfect sun. --Shak. I fear I am not in my perfect mind. --Shak. O most entire perfect sacrifice! --Keble. God made thee perfect, not immutable. --Milton. 2. Well informed; certain; sure. I am perfect that the Pannonains are now in arms. --Shak. 3. (Bot.) Hermaphrodite; having both stamens and pistils; -- said of flower. Perfect cadence (Mus.), a complete and satisfactory close in harmony, as upon the tonic preceded by the dominant. Perfect chord (Mus.), a concord or union of sounds which is perfectly coalescent and agreeable to the ear, as the unison, octave, fifth, and fourth; a perfect consonance; a common chord in its original position of keynote, third, fifth, and octave. Perfect number (Arith.), a number equal to the sum of all its divisors; as, 28, whose aliquot parts, or divisors, are 14, 7, 4, 2, 1. See Abundant number, under Abundant. --Brande & C. Perfect tense (Gram.), a tense which expresses an act or state completed.
Perfect number
Perfect Per"fect, a. [OE. parfit, OF. parfit, parfet, parfait, F. parfait, L. perfectus, p. p. of perficere to carry to the end, to perform, finish, perfect; per (see Per-) + facere to make, do. See Fact.] 1. Brought to consummation or completeness; completed; not defective nor redundant; having all the properties or qualities requisite to its nature and kind; without flaw, fault, or blemish; without error; mature; whole; pure; sound; right; correct. My strength is made perfect in weakness. --2 Cor. xii. 9. Three glorious suns, each one a perfect sun. --Shak. I fear I am not in my perfect mind. --Shak. O most entire perfect sacrifice! --Keble. God made thee perfect, not immutable. --Milton. 2. Well informed; certain; sure. I am perfect that the Pannonains are now in arms. --Shak. 3. (Bot.) Hermaphrodite; having both stamens and pistils; -- said of flower. Perfect cadence (Mus.), a complete and satisfactory close in harmony, as upon the tonic preceded by the dominant. Perfect chord (Mus.), a concord or union of sounds which is perfectly coalescent and agreeable to the ear, as the unison, octave, fifth, and fourth; a perfect consonance; a common chord in its original position of keynote, third, fifth, and octave. Perfect number (Arith.), a number equal to the sum of all its divisors; as, 28, whose aliquot parts, or divisors, are 14, 7, 4, 2, 1. See Abundant number, under Abundant. --Brande & C. Perfect tense (Gram.), a tense which expresses an act or state completed.

Meaning of Ect from wikipedia

- superiority of ECT in all comparisons: ECT versus simulated ECT, ECT versus placebo, ECT versus antidepressants in general, ECT versus tricyclics and ECT versus...
- ECT may refer to: École Canadienne de Tunis, a school in Tunis, Tunisia Emirates College of Technology, in Abu Dhabi ECN-capable transport, a transport...
- Eddy-current testing (also commonly seen as eddy current testing and ECT) is one of many electromagnetic testing methods used in nondestructive testing...
- Ector can refer to: A variation of the name Hector Ector, a city in Fannin County, Texas Ector County, Texas Sir Ector, King Arthur's foster father in...
- Sir Ector /ˈɛktɔːr, -ər/, sometimes Hector, Antor, or Ectorius, is the father of Sir Kay and the adoptive father of King Arthur in the Matter of Britain...
- ECTS may refer to: Elementary cognitive tasks, from psychometrics Engine coolant temperature sensor European Calcified Tissue Society European Computer...
- Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT, in the past sometimes called electric convulsion therapy, convulsion treatment or electroplexy) is a controversial psychiatric...
- European Credit Transfer and Ac****ulation System (ECTS) is a standard means for comparing academic credits, i.e., the "volume of learning based on the...
- outcomes and can be potentially fatal. Treatment with benzodiazepines or ECT can lead to remission of catatonia. There is growing evidence of the effectiveness...
- The European Court of Human Rights (ECHR or ECtHR), also known as the Strasbourg Court, is an international court of the Council of Europe which interprets...
Loading...