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At the last gasp
Gasp Gasp, n. The act of opening the mouth convulsively to catch the breath; a labored respiration; a painful catching of the breath. At the last gasp, at the point of death. --Addison.
Bee larkspur
Bee larkspur Bee" lark`spur (Bot.) See Larkspur.
Bone lace
Lace Lace (l[=a]s), n. [OE. las, OF. laz, F. lacs, dim. lacet, fr. L. laqueus noose, snare; prob. akin to lacere to entice. Cf. Delight, Elicit, Lasso, Latchet.] 1. That which binds or holds, especially by being interwoven; a string, cord, or band, usually one passing through eyelet or other holes, and used in drawing and holding together parts of a garment, of a shoe, of a machine belt, etc. His hat hung at his back down by a lace. --Chaucer. For striving more, the more in laces strong Himself he tied. --Spenser. 2. A snare or gin, especially one made of interwoven cords; a net. [Obs.] --Fairfax. Vulcanus had caught thee [Venus] in his lace. --Chaucer. 3. A fabric of fine threads of linen, silk, cotton, etc., often ornamented with figures; a delicate tissue of thread, much worn as an ornament of dress. Our English dames are much given to the wearing of costlylaces. --Bacon. 4. Spirits added to coffee or some other beverage. [Old Slang] --Addison. Alencon lace, a kind of point lace, entirely of needlework, first made at Alencon in France, in the 17th century. It is very durable and of great beauty and cost. Bone lace, Brussels lace, etc. See under Bone, Brussels, etc. Gold lace, or Silver lace, lace having warp threads of silk, or silk and cotton, and a weft of silk threads covered with gold (or silver), or with gilt. Lace leather, thin, oil-tanned leather suitable for cutting into lacings for machine belts. Lace lizard (Zo["o]l.), a large, aquatic, Australian lizard (Hydrosaurus giganteus), allied to the monitors. Lace paper, paper with an openwork design in imitation of lace. Lace piece (Shipbuilding), the main piece of timber which supports the beak or head projecting beyond the stem of a ship. Lace pillow, & Pillow lace. See under Pillow.
Book of the Law of Moses
Pentateuch Pen"ta*teuch, n. [L. pentateuchus, Gr. ?; ? (see Penta-) + ? a tool, implement, a book, akin to ? to prepare, make ready, and perh. to E. text. See Five, and Text.] The first five books of the Old Testament, collectively; -- called also the Law of Moses, Book of the Law of Moses, etc.
Cayenne lapwing
Terutero Ter`u*ter"o, n. [Probably so named from its city.] (Zo["o]l.) The South American lapwing (Vanellus Cayennensis). Its wings are furnished with short spurs. Called also Cayenne lapwing.
Daphne Laureola
Wood Wood, n. [OE. wode, wude, AS. wudu, wiodu; akin to OHG. witu, Icel. vi?r, Dan. & Sw. ved wood, and probably to Ir. & Gael. fiodh, W. gwydd trees, shrubs.] 1. A large and thick collection of trees; a forest or grove; -- frequently used in the plural. Light thickens, and the crow Makes wing to the rooky wood. --Shak. 2. The substance of trees and the like; the hard fibrous substance which composes the body of a tree and its branches, and which is covered by the bark; timber. ``To worship their own work in wood and stone for gods.' --Milton. 3. (Bot.) The fibrous material which makes up the greater part of the stems and branches of trees and shrubby plants, and is found to a less extent in herbaceous stems. It consists of elongated tubular or needle-shaped cells of various kinds, usually interwoven with the shinning bands called silver grain. Note: Wood consists chiefly of the carbohydrates cellulose and lignin, which are isomeric with starch. 4. Trees cut or sawed for the fire or other uses. Wood acid, Wood vinegar (Chem.), a complex acid liquid obtained in the dry distillation of wood, and containing large quantities of acetic acid; hence, specifically, acetic acid. Formerly called pyroligneous acid. Wood anemone (Bot.), a delicate flower (Anemone nemorosa) of early spring; -- also called windflower. See Illust. of Anemone. Wood ant (Zo["o]l.), a large ant (Formica rufa) which lives in woods and forests, and constructs large nests. Wood apple (Bot.). See Elephant apple, under Elephant. Wood baboon (Zo["o]l.), the drill. Wood betony. (Bot.) (a) Same as Betony. (b) The common American lousewort (Pedicularis Canadensis), a low perennial herb with yellowish or purplish flowers. Wood borer. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The larva of any one of numerous species of boring beetles, esp. elaters, longicorn beetles, buprestidans, and certain weevils. See Apple borer, under Apple, and Pine weevil, under Pine. (b) The larva of any one of various species of lepidopterous insects, especially of the clearwing moths, as the peach-tree borer (see under Peach), and of the goat moths. (c) The larva of various species of hymenopterous of the tribe Urocerata. See Tremex. (d) Any one of several bivalve shells which bore in wood, as the teredos, and species of Xylophaga. (e) Any one of several species of small Crustacea, as the Limnoria, and the boring amphipod (Chelura terebrans). Wood carpet, a kind of floor covering made of thin pieces of wood secured to a flexible backing, as of cloth. --Knight. Wood cell (Bot.), a slender cylindrical or prismatic cell usually tapering to a point at both ends. It is the principal constituent of woody fiber. Wood choir, the choir, or chorus, of birds in the woods. [Poetic] --Coleridge. Wood coal, charcoal; also, lignite, or brown coal. Wood cricket (Zo["o]l.), a small European cricket (Nemobius sylvestris). Wood culver (Zo["o]l.), the wood pigeon. Wood cut, an engraving on wood; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood dove (Zo["o]l.), the stockdove. Wood drink, a decoction or infusion of medicinal woods. Wood duck (Zo["o]l.) (a) A very beautiful American duck (Aix sponsa). The male has a large crest, and its plumage is varied with green, purple, black, white, and red. It builds its nest in trees, whence the name. Called also bridal duck, summer duck, and wood widgeon. (b) The hooded merganser. (c) The Australian maned goose (Chlamydochen jubata). Wood echo, an echo from the wood. Wood engraver. (a) An engraver on wood. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any of several species of small beetles whose larv[ae] bore beneath the bark of trees, and excavate furrows in the wood often more or less resembling coarse engravings; especially, Xyleborus xylographus. Wood engraving. (a) The act or art engraving on wood; xylography. (b) An engraving on wood; a wood cut; also, a print from such an engraving. Wood fern. (Bot.) See Shield fern, under Shield. Wood fiber. (a) (Bot.) Fibrovascular tissue. (b) Wood comminuted, and reduced to a powdery or dusty mass. Wood fretter (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of beetles whose larv[ae] bore in the wood, or beneath the bark, of trees. Wood frog (Zo["o]l.), a common North American frog (Rana sylvatica) which lives chiefly in the woods, except during the breeding season. It is drab or yellowish brown, with a black stripe on each side of the head. Wood germander. (Bot.) See under Germander. Wood god, a fabled sylvan deity. Wood grass. (Bot.) See under Grass. Wood grouse. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The capercailzie. (b) The spruce partridge. See under Spruce. Wood guest (Zo["o]l.), the ringdove. [Prov. Eng.] Wood hen. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of several species of Old World short-winged rails of the genus Ocydromus, including the weka and allied species. (b) The American woodcock. Wood hoopoe (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of Old World arboreal birds belonging to Irrisor and allied genera. They are closely allied to the common hoopoe, but have a curved beak, and a longer tail. Wood ibis (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of large, long-legged, wading birds belonging to the genus Tantalus. The head and neck are naked or scantily covered with feathers. The American wood ibis (Tantalus loculator) is common in Florida. Wood lark (Zo["o]l.), a small European lark (Alauda arborea), which, like, the skylark, utters its notes while on the wing. So called from its habit of perching on trees. Wood laurel (Bot.), a European evergreen shrub (Daphne Laureola). Wood leopard (Zo["o]l.), a European spotted moth (Zeuzera [ae]sculi) allied to the goat moth. Its large fleshy larva bores in the wood of the apple, pear, and other fruit trees. Wood lily (Bot.), the lily of the valley. Wood lock (Naut.), a piece of wood close fitted and sheathed with copper, in the throating or score of the pintle, to keep the rudder from rising. Wood louse (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of terrestrial isopod Crustacea belonging to Oniscus, Armadillo, and related genera. See Sow bug, under Sow, and Pill bug, under Pill. (b) Any one of several species of small, wingless, pseudoneuropterous insects of the family Psocid[ae], which live in the crevices of walls and among old books and papers. Some of the species are called also book lice, and deathticks, or deathwatches. Wood mite (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous small mites of the family Oribatid[ae]. They are found chiefly in woods, on tree trunks and stones. Wood mote. (Eng. Law) (a) Formerly, the forest court. (b) The court of attachment. Wood nettle. (Bot.) See under Nettle. Wood nightshade (Bot.), woody nightshade. Wood nut (Bot.), the filbert. Wood nymph. (a) A nymph inhabiting the woods; a fabled goddess of the woods; a dryad. ``The wood nymphs, decked with daisies trim.' --Milton. (b) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored moths belonging to the genus Eudryas. The larv[ae] are bright-colored, and some of the species, as Eudryas grata, and E. unio, feed on the leaves of the grapevine. (c) (Zo["o]l.) Any one of several species of handsomely colored South American humming birds belonging to the genus Thalurania. The males are bright blue, or green and blue. Wood offering, wood burnt on the altar. We cast the lots . . . for the wood offering. --Neh. x. 34. Wood oil (Bot.), a resinous oil obtained from several East Indian trees of the genus Dipterocarpus, having properties similar to those of copaiba, and sometimes substituted for it. It is also used for mixing paint. See Gurjun. Wood opal (Min.), a striped variety of coarse opal, having some resemblance to wood. Wood paper, paper made of wood pulp. See Wood pulp, below. Wood pewee (Zo["o]l.), a North American tyrant flycatcher (Contopus virens). It closely resembles the pewee, but is smaller. Wood pie (Zo["o]l.), any black and white woodpecker, especially the European great spotted woodpecker. Wood pigeon. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of Old World pigeons belonging to Palumbus and allied genera of the family Columbid[ae]. (b) The ringdove. Wood puceron (Zo["o]l.), a plant louse. Wood pulp (Technol.), vegetable fiber obtained from the poplar and other white woods, and so softened by digestion with a hot solution of alkali that it can be formed into sheet paper, etc. It is now produced on an immense scale. Wood quail (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of East Indian crested quails belonging to Rollulus and allied genera, as the red-crested wood quail (R. roulroul), the male of which is bright green, with a long crest of red hairlike feathers. Wood rabbit (Zo["o]l.), the cottontail. Wood rat (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of American wild rats of the genus Neotoma found in the Southern United States; -- called also bush rat. The Florida wood rat (Neotoma Floridana) is the best-known species. Wood reed grass (Bot.), a tall grass (Cinna arundinacea) growing in moist woods. Wood reeve, the steward or overseer of a wood. [Eng.] Wood rush (Bot.), any plant of the genus Luzula, differing from the true rushes of the genus Juncus chiefly in having very few seeds in each capsule. Wood sage (Bot.), a name given to several labiate plants of the genus Teucrium. See Germander. Wood screw, a metal screw formed with a sharp thread, and usually with a slotted head, for insertion in wood. Wood sheldrake (Zo["o]l.), the hooded merganser. Wood shock (Zo["o]l.), the fisher. See Fisher, 2. Wood shrike (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World singing birds belonging to Grallina, Collyricincla, Prionops, and allied genera, common in India and Australia. They are allied to the true shrikes, but feed upon both insects and berries. Wood snipe. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The American woodcock. (b) An Asiatic snipe (Gallinago nemoricola). Wood soot, soot from burnt wood. Wood sore. (Zo["o]l.) See Cuckoo spit, under Cuckoo. Wood sorrel (Bot.), a plant of the genus Oxalis (Oxalis Acetosella), having an acid taste. See Illust. (a) of Shamrock. Wood spirit. (Chem.) See Methyl alcohol, under Methyl. Wood stamp, a carved or engraved block or stamp of wood, for impressing figures or colors on fabrics. Wood star (Zo["o]l.), any one of several species of small South American humming birds belonging to the genus Calothorax. The male has a brilliant gorget of blue, purple, and other colors. Wood sucker (Zo["o]l.), the yaffle. Wood swallow (Zo["o]l.), any one of numerous species of Old World passerine birds belonging to the genus Artamus and allied genera of the family Artamid[ae]. They are common in the East Indies, Asia, and Australia. In form and habits they resemble swallows, but in structure they resemble shrikes. They are usually black above and white beneath. Wood tapper (Zo["o]l.), any woodpecker. Wood tar. See under Tar. Wood thrush, (Zo["o]l.) (a) An American thrush (Turdus mustelinus) noted for the sweetness of its song. See under Thrush. (b) The missel thrush. Wood tick. See in Vocabulary. Wood tin. (Min.). See Cassiterite. Wood titmouse (Zo["o]l.), the goldcgest. Wood tortoise (Zo["o]l.), the sculptured tortoise. See under Sculptured. Wood vine (Bot.), the white bryony. Wood vinegar. See Wood acid, above. Wood warbler. (Zo["o]l.) (a) Any one of numerous species of American warblers of the genus Dendroica. See Warbler. (b) A European warbler (Phylloscopus sibilatrix); -- called also green wren, wood wren, and yellow wren. Wood worm (Zo["o]l.), a larva that bores in wood; a wood borer. Wood wren. (Zo["o]l.) (a) The wood warbler. (b) The willow warbler.
de Laval turbine
Turbine Tur"bine, n. A form of steam engine analogous in construction and action to the water turbine. There are practically only two distinct kinds, and they are typified in the de Laval and the Parsons and Curtis turbines. The de Laval turbine is an impulse turbine, in which steam impinges upon revolving blades from a flared nozzle. The flare of the nozzle causes expansion of the steam, and hence changes its pressure energy into kinetic energy. An enormous velocity (30,000 revolutions per minute in the 5 H. P. size) is requisite for high efficiency, and the machine has therefore to be geared down to be of practical use. Some recent development of this type include turbines formed of several de Laval elements compounded as in the ordinary expansion engine. The Parsons turbine is an impulse-and-reaction turbine, usually of the axial type. The steam is constrained to pass successively through alternate rows of fixed and moving blades, being expanded down to a condenser pressure of about 1 lb. per square inch absolute. The Curtis turbine is somewhat simpler than the Parsons, and consists of elements each of which has at least two rows of moving blades and one row of stationary. The bucket velocity is lowered by fractional velocity reduction. Both the Parsons and Curtis turbines are suitable for driving dynamos and steamships directly. In efficiency, lightness, and bulk for a given power, they compare favorably with reciprocating engines.
Duchesse lace
Duchesse lace Du`chesse" lace A beautiful variety of Brussels pillow lace made originally in Belgium and resembling Honiton guipure. It is worked with fine thread in large sprays, usually of the primrose pattern, with much raised work.
E lanceolatus
Horseman Horse"man, n.; pl. Horsemen. 1. A rider on horseback; one skilled in the management of horses; a mounted man. 2. (Mil.) A mounted soldier; a cavalryman. 3. (Zo["o]l.) (a) A land crab of the genus Ocypoda, living on the coast of Brazil and the West Indies, noted for running very swiftly. (b) A West Indian fish of the genus Eques, as the light-horseman (E. lanceolatus).
Engine lathe
3. The movable swing frame of a loom, carrying the reed for separating the warp threads and beating up the weft; -- called also lay and batten. Blanchard lathe, a lathe for turning irregular forms after a given pattern, as lasts, gunstocks, and the like. Drill lathe, or Speed lathe, a small lathe which, from its high speed, is adapted for drilling; a hand lathe. Engine lathe, a turning lathe in which the cutting tool has an automatic feed; -- used chiefly for turning and boring metals, cutting screws, etc. Foot lathe, a lathe which is driven by a treadle worked by the foot. Geometric lathe. See under Geometric Hand lathe, a lathe operated by hand; a power turning lathe without an automatic feed for the tool. Slide lathe, an engine lathe. Throw lathe, a small lathe worked by one hand, while the cutting tool is held in the other.
Engine lathe
Engine En"gine, n. [F. engin skill, machine, engine, L. ingenium natural capacity, invention; in in + the root of gignere to produce. See Genius, and cf. Ingenious, Gin a snare.] 1. (Pronounced, in this sense, ????.) Natural capacity; ability; skill. [Obs.] A man hath sapiences three, Memory, engine, and intellect also. --Chaucer. 2. Anything used to effect a purpose; any device or contrivance; an agent. --Shak. You see the ways the fisherman doth take To catch the fish; what engines doth he make? --Bunyan. Their promises, enticements, oaths, tokens, and all these engines of lust. --Shak. 3. Any instrument by which any effect is produced; especially, an instrument or machine of war or torture. ``Terrible engines of death.' --Sir W. Raleigh. 4. (Mach.) A compound machine by which any physical power is applied to produce a given physical effect. Engine driver, one who manages an engine; specifically, the engineer of a locomotive. Engine lathe. (Mach.) See under Lathe. Engine tool, a machine tool. --J. Whitworth. Engine turning (Fine Arts), a method of ornamentation by means of a rose engine. Note: The term engine is more commonly applied to massive machines, or to those giving power, or which produce some difficult result. Engines, as motors, are distinguished according to the source of power, as steam engine, air engine, electro-magnetic engine; or the purpose on account of which the power is applied, as fire engine, pumping engine, locomotive engine; or some peculiarity of construction or operation, as single-acting or double-acting engine, high-pressure or low-pressure engine, condensing engine, etc.
Free lance
Lance Lance, n. [OE. lance, F. lance, fr. L. lancea; cf. Gr. ?. Cf. Launch.] 1. A weapon of war, consisting of a long shaft or handle and a steel blade or head; a spear carried by horsemen, and often decorated with a small flag; also, a spear or harpoon used by whalers and fishermen. A braver soldier never couched lance. --Shak. 2. A soldier armed with a lance; a lancer. 3. (Founding) A small iron rod which suspends the core of the mold in casting a shell. 4. (Mil.) An instrument which conveys the charge of a piece of ordnance and forces it home. 5. (Pyrotech.) One of the small paper cases filled with combustible composition, which mark the outlines of a figure. Free lance, in the Middle Ages, and subsequently, a knight or roving soldier, who was free to engage for any state or commander that purchased his services; hence, a person who assails institutions or opinions on his own responsibility without regard to party lines or deference to authority. Lance bucket (Cavalry), a socket attached to a saddle or stirrup strap, in which to rest the but of a lance. Lance corporal, same as Lancepesade. Lance knight, a lansquenet. --B. Jonson. Lance snake (Zo["o]l.), the fer-de-lance. Stink-fire lance (Mil.), a kind of fuse filled with a composition which burns with a suffocating odor; -- used in the counter operations of miners. To break a lance, to engage in a tilt or contest.
incandescence lamp
, contained in a vacuum, and heated to incandescence by an electric current, as in the Edison lamp; -- called also incandescence lamp, and glowlamp.
Indo-do-Chinese languages
Indo-do-Chinese languages In`do-do-Chinese languages A family of languages, mostly of the isolating type, although some are agglutinative, spoken in the great area extending from northern India in the west to Formosa in the east and from Central Asia in the north to the Malay Peninsula in the south.
Inflective language
Inflective In*flect"ive, a. 1. Capable of, or pertaining to, inflection; deflecting; as, the inflective quality of the air. --Derham. 2. (Gram.) Inflectional; characterized by variation, or change in form, to mark case, tense, etc.; subject to inflection. Inflective language (Philol.), a language like the Greek or Latin, consisting largely of stems with variable terminations or suffixes which were once independent words. English is both agglutinative, as, manlike, headache, and inflective, as, he, his, him. Cf. Agglutinative.
Late Latin
Latin Lat"in, n. 1. A native or inhabitant of Latium; a Roman. 2. The language of the ancient Romans. 3. An exercise in schools, consisting in turning English into Latin. [Obs.] --Ascham. 4. (Eccl.) A member of the Roman Catholic Church. Dog Latin, barbarous Latin; a jargon in imitation of Latin; as, the log Latin of schoolboys. Late Latin, Low Latin, terms used indifferently to designate the latest stages of the Latin language; low Latin (and, perhaps, late Latin also), including the barbarous coinages from the French, German, and other languages into a Latin form made after the Latin had become a dead language for the people. Law Latin, that kind of late, or low, Latin, used in statutes and legal instruments; -- often barbarous.
Limb of the law
Limb Limb (l[i^]m), n. [OE. lim, AS. lim; akin to Icel. limr limb, lim branch of a tree, Sw. & Dan. lem limb; cf. also AS. li[eth], OHG. lid, gilid, G. glied, Goth. li[thorn]us. Cf. Lith, Limber.] 1. A part of a tree which extends from the trunk and separates into branches and twigs; a large branch. 2. An arm or a leg of a human being; a leg, arm, or wing of an animal. A second Hector for his grim aspect, And large proportion of his strong-knit limbs. --Shak. 3. A thing or person regarded as a part or member of, or attachment to, something else. --Shak. That little limb of the devil has cheated the gallows. --Sir W. Scott. 4. An elementary piece of the mechanism of a lock. Limb of the law, a lawyer or an officer of the law. [Colloq.] --Landor.
Lisle lace
Lisle Lisle (l[imac]l), n. A city of France celebrated for certain manufactures. Lisle glove, a fine summer glove, made of Lisle thread. Lisle lace, a fine handmade lace, made at Lisle. Lisle thread, a hard twisted cotton thread, originally produced at Lisle.
Macrame lace
Macrame lace Mac"ra*me lace" A coarse lace made of twine, used especially in decorating furniture.
Magpie lark
Magpie Mag"pie, n. [OE. & Prov. E. magot pie, maggoty pie, fr. Mag, Maggot, equiv. to Margaret, and fr. F. Marquerite, and common name of the magpie. Marguerite is fr. L. margarita pearl, Gr. ?, prob. of Eastern origin. See Pie magpie, and cf. the analogous names Tomtit, and Jackdaw.] (Zo["o]l.) Any one of numerous species of the genus Pica and related genera, allied to the jays, but having a long graduated tail. Note: The common European magpie (Pica pica, or P. caudata) is a black and white noisy and mischievous bird. It can be taught to speak. The American magpie (P. Hudsonica) is very similar. The yellow-belled magpie (P. Nuttalli) inhabits California. The blue magpie (Cyanopolius Cooki) inhabits Spain. Other allied species are found in Asia. The Tasmanian and Australian magpies are crow shrikes, as the white magpie (Gymnorhina organicum), the black magpie (Strepera fuliginosa), and the Australian magpie (Cracticus picatus). Magpie lark (Zo["o]l.), a common Australian bird (Grallina picata), conspicuously marked with black and white; -- called also little magpie. Magpie moth (Zo["o]l.), a black and white European geometrid moth (Abraxas grossulariata); the harlequin moth. Its larva feeds on currant and gooseberry bushes.
Maine law
Maine Maine, n. One of the New England States. Maine law, any law prohibiting the manufacture and sale of intoxicating beverages, esp. one resembling that enacted in the State of Maine.
Marine law
Marine engine (Mech.), a steam engine for propelling a vessel. Marine glue. See under Glue. Marine insurance, insurance against the perils of the sea, including also risks of fire, piracy, and barratry. Marine interest, interest at any rate agreed on for money lent upon respondentia and bottomry bonds. Marine law. See under Law. Marine league, three geographical miles. Marine metal, an alloy of lead, antimony, and mercury, made for sheathing ships. --Mc Elrath. Marine soap, cocoanut oil soap; -- so called because, being quite soluble in salt water, it is much used on shipboard. Marine store, a store where old canvas, ropes, etc., are bought and sold; a junk shop. [Eng.]
Maritime law
Maritime Mar"i*time, a. [L. maritimus, fr. mare the sea: cf. F. maritime. See Mere a pool.] 1. Bordering on, or situated near, the ocean; connected with the sea by site, interest, or power; having shipping and commerce or a navy; as, maritime states. ``A maritime town.' --Addison. 2. Of or pertaining to the ocean; marine; pertaining to navigation and naval affairs, or to shipping and commerce by sea. ``Maritime service.' --Sir H. Wotton. Maritime law. See Law. Maritime loan, a loan secured by bottomry or respodentia bonds. Martime nations, nations having seaports, and using the sea more or less for war or commerce.
Mousseline de laine
Mousseline Mousse`line", n. [F.] Muslin. Mousseline de laine. [F., muslin of wool.] Muslin delaine. See under Muslin. Mousseline glass, a kind of thin blown glassware, such as wineglasses, etc.
Pipe layer
Pipelayer Pipe"lay`er, n., or Pipe layer Pipe" lay`er 1. One who lays conducting pipes in the ground, as for water, gas, etc. 2. (Polit. Cant) A politician who works in secret; -- in this sense, usually written as one word. [U.S.]
Pipe laying
Pipelaying Pipe"lay`ing, n., or Pipe laying Pipe" lay`ing 1. The laying of conducting pipes underground, as for water, gas, etc. 2. (Polit. Cant) The act or method of making combinations for personal advantage secretly or slyly; -- in this sense, usually written as one word. [U.S.]
Rose lake
Rose de Pompadour, Rose du Barry, names succesively given to a delicate rose color used on S[`e]vres porcelain. Rose diamond, a diamond, one side of which is flat, and the other cut into twenty-four triangular facets in two ranges which form a convex face pointed at the top. Cf. Brilliant, n. Rose ear. See under Ear. Rose elder (Bot.), the Guelder-rose. Rose engine, a machine, or an appendage to a turning lathe, by which a surface or wood, metal, etc., is engraved with a variety of curved lines. --Craig. Rose family (Bot.) the Rosece[ae]. See Rosaceous. Rose fever (Med.), rose cold. Rose fly (Zo["o]l.), a rose betle, or rose chafer. Rose gall (Zo["o]l.), any gall found on rosebushes. See Bedeguar. Rose knot, a ribbon, or other pliade band plaited so as to resemble a rose; a rosette. Rose lake, Rose madder, a rich tint prepared from lac and madder precipitated on an earthy basis. --Fairholt. Rose mallow. (Bot.) (a) A name of several malvaceous plants of the genus Hibiscus, with large rose-colored flowers. (b) the hollyhock. Rose nail, a nail with a convex, faceted head. Rose noble, an ancient English gold coin, stamped with the figure of a rose, first struck in the reign of Edward III., and current at 6s. 8d. --Sir W. Scott. Rose of China. (Bot.) See China rose (b), under China. Rose of Jericho (Bot.), a Syrian cruciferous plant (Anastatica Hierochuntica) which rolls up when dry, and expands again when moistened; -- called also resurrection plant. Rose of Sharon (Bot.), an ornamental malvaceous shrub (Hibiscus Syriacus). In the Bible the name is used for some flower not yet identified, perhaps a Narcissus, or possibly the great lotus flower. Rose oil (Chem.), the yellow essential oil extracted from various species of rose blossoms, and forming the chief part of attar of roses. Rose pink, a pigment of a rose color, made by dyeing chalk or whiting with a decoction of Brazil wood and alum; also, the color of the pigment. Rose quartz (Min.), a variety of quartz which is rose-red. Rose rash. (Med.) Same as Roseola. Rose slug (Zo["o]l.), the small green larva of a black sawfly (Selandria ros[ae]). These larv[ae] feed in groups on the parenchyma of the leaves of rosebushes, and are often abundant and very destructive. Rose window (Arch.), a circular window filled with ornamental tracery. Called also Catherine wheel, and marigold window. Cf. wheel window, under Wheel. Summer rose (Med.), a variety of roseola. See Roseola. Under the rose [a translation of L. sub rosa], in secret; privately; in a manner that forbids disclosure; -- the rose being among the ancients the symbol of secrecy, and hung up at entertainments as a token that nothing there said was to be divulged. Wars of the Roses (Eng. Hist.), feuds between the Houses of York and Lancaster, the white rose being the badge of the House of York, and the red rose of the House of Lancaster.
Shore lark
Shore Shore, n. [OE. schore, AS. score, probably fr. scieran, and so meaning properly, that which is shorn off, edge; akin to OD. schoore, schoor. See Shear, v. t.] The coast or land adjacent to a large body of water, as an ocean, lake, or large river. Michael Cassio, Lieutenant to the warlike Moor Othello, Is come shore. --Shak. The fruitful shore of muddy Nile. --Spenser. In shore, near the shore. --Marryat. On shore. See under On. Shore birds (Zo["o]l.), a collective name for the various limicoline birds found on the seashore. Shore crab (Zo["o]l.), any crab found on the beaches, or between tides, especially any one of various species of grapsoid crabs, as Heterograpsus nudus of California. Shore lark (Zo["o]l.), a small American lark (Otocoris alpestris) found in winter, both on the seacoast and on the Western plains. Its upper parts are varied with dark brown and light brown. It has a yellow throat, yellow local streaks, a black crescent on its breast, a black streak below each eye, and two small black erectile ear tufts. Called also horned lark. Shore plover (Zo["o]l.), a large-billed Australian plover (Esacus magnirostris). It lives on the seashore, and feeds on crustaceans, etc. Shore teetan (Zo["o]l.), the rock pipit (Anthus obscurus). [Prov. Eng.]
Simple larceny
Larceny Lar"ce*ny, n.; pl. Larcenies. [F. larcin, OE. larrecin, L. latrocinium, fr. latro robber, mercenary, hired servant; cf. Gr. (?) hired servant. Cf. Latrociny.] (Law) The unlawful taking and carrying away of things personal with intent to deprive the right owner of the same; theft. Cf. Embezzlement. Grand larceny & Petit larceny are distinctions having reference to the nature or value of the property stolen. They are abolished in England. Mixed, or Compound, larceny, that which, under statute, includes in it the aggravation of a taking from a building or the person. Simple larceny, that which is not accompanied with any aggravating circumstances.
Simple larceny
12. (Min.) Homogenous. 13. (Zo["o]l.) Consisting of a single individual or zooid; as, a simple ascidian; -- opposed to compound. Simple contract (Law), any contract, whether verbal or written, which is not of record or under seal. --J. W. Smith. --Chitty. Simple equation (Alg.), an eqyation containing but one unknown quantity, and that quantity only in the first degree. Simple eye (Zo["o]l.), an eye having a single lens; -- opposed to compound eye. Simple interest. See under Interest. Simple larceny. (Law) See under Larceny. Simple obligation (Rom. Law), an obligation which does not depend for its execution upon any event provided for by the parties, or is not to become void on the happening of any such event. --Burrill. Syn: Single; uncompounded; unmingled; unmixed; mere; uncombined; elementary; plain; artless; sincere; harmless; undesigning; frank; open; unaffected; inartificial; unadorned; credulous; silly; foolish; shallow; unwise. Usage: Simple, Silly. One who is simple is sincere, unaffected, and inexperienced in duplicity, -- hence liable to be duped. A silly person is one who is ignorant or weak and also self-confident; hence, one who shows in speech and act a lack of good sense. Simplicity is incompatible with duplicity, artfulness, or vanity, while silliness is consistent with all three. Simplicity denotes lack of knowledge or of guile; silliness denotes want of judgment or right purpose, a defect of character as well as of education. I am a simple woman, much too weak To oppose your cunning. --Shak. He is the companion of the silliest people in their most silly pleasure; he is ready for every impertinent entertainment and diversion. --Law.

Meaning of E la from wikipedia

- Life Is Beautiful (Italian: La vita è bella, Italian pronunciation: [la ˈviːta ˈɛ bˈbɛlla]) is a 1997 Italian comedy drama film directed by and starring...
- "Che La Luna" (Louis Prima, 1972) Problems playing this file? See media help. "Luna mezz'o mare" (Moon amid the sea) is a comic Sicilian song with worldwide...
- "La donna è mobile" (pronounced [la ˈdɔnna ˌɛ mˈmɔːbile]; "Woman is fickle") is the Duke of Mantua's canzone from the beginning of act 3 of Giuseppe Verdi's...
- The Tiger and the Snow (Italian: La tigre e la neve) is a 2005 Italian comedy-drama film starring and directed by Roberto Benigni. Inspired by the fairy...
- Sarlat-la-Canéda (French: [saʁla la kaneda] (listen); Occitan: Sarlat e La Canedat), commonly known as Sarlat, is a commune in the southwestern French...
- Gloria Estela La Riva (born August 13, 1954) is an American perennial political candidate, and communist activist with the Party for Socialism and Liberation...
- Non è la RAI (Italian: It’s Not RAI) was an Italian TV show, on air from 9 September 1991 to 30 June 1995. Initially broadcast by Canale 5, from January...
- Hercules Unchained (Italian: Ercole e la regina di Lidia [ˈɛrkole е la reˈdʒiːna di ˈliːdja], "Hercules and the Queen of Lydia") is a 1959 Italian-French...
- Kirikou and the Sorceress (French: Kirikou et la Sorcière, [kiʁiku e la sɔʁsjɛʁ]) is a 1998 traditional animation feature film written and directed by...
- And the Ship Sails On (Italian: E la nave va) is a 1983 Italian film directed and co-written by Federico Fellini. It depicts the events on board a luxury...